Food for the future: A vision for New England farming and food production

September 17th, 2014

Reposted from BrandeisNOW

By Julian Cardillo

Aug. 29, 2014

Cut down trees to benefit the environment and improve human health?

That may seem counter-intuitive, but Brian Donahue, professor of environmental studies, says in the long term converting some of New England’s forests into farmland and pastures could create a food system that is healthy, sustainable and prevents global warming. It also is a critical step in enabling New England to produce half of its food needs by 2060.

Donahue is the lead author of A New England Food Vision, a perspective on the future of the region’s food needs. Calling access to food a basic human right, he and co-authors, who include researchers from the University of New Hampshire, College of the Atlantic, University of Southern Maine and University of Vermont, propose changes in food production and distribution across the region.

At present, five percent of New England’s land is used to produce food while 80 percent is forested. The researchers call for using 15 percent, or 6 million acres, of the region’s land for food production.

“We are not talking about running out and cutting down a bunch of trees,” Donahue explains. “It would be gradual, happening over a half of century or more. We need adequate conservation. You want to be careful about how you go about this, as forests give us immense benefits.” Read more here!


Jillian Powers on “The Morning Shift” WBEZ Chicago

September 3rd, 2014

On September 3rd, 2014, Jillian Powers was the guest expert on “The Morning Shift,” WBEZ Chicago’s morning program at 10:20 a.m. Powers spoke on the topic of “America, Traditions, and New Immigrants. Click here to listen to the program!


The Many Dimensions of Herbert Marcuse Conference October 1-2, 2014

August 6th, 2014


October 1-2, 2014, Rapaporte Treasure Hall

This two-day conference will explore the critical theory of Herbert Marcuse.

The conference coincides with the 50th anniversary of the publication of Marcuse’s most famous book, “One-Dimensional Man: Studies in the Ideology of Advanced Industrial Society,” and our recent discovery of an early draft of this book that was given to Brandeis by Marcuse himself.

All conference events will be held in the Rapaporte Treasure Hall in Brandeis’ Goldfarb Library.

Registration for the conference is free.

Lunch will be provided both days.

For more information, please see the conference website.


Home Calendar of Events “The Secret White House Cuban Missile Crisis: Getting it Right after Half a Century” – Sheldon Stern

March 3rd, 2014

Stern Talk

On March 12th at 5:00pm, historian Sheldon Stern will give a talk titled, The Secret White House Cuban Missile Crisis: Getting it Right after Half a Century. Stern received a B.A. in history from the City University of New York and an M.A. and Ph.D. in history from Harvard University. He taught at several colleges and universities before becoming Historian at the JFK Library and Museum in Boston (1977-2000). He was the first non-participant in the ExComm meetings and the first professional historian to hear all of the then classified Cuban missile crisis tapes. He is the author of many articles, as well as the books Averting ‘the final failure’: John F. Kennedy and the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis Meetings (2003), The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis (2005), and The Cuban Missile Crisis in American Memory: Myths vs. Reality (2012), in the Stanford University Press Nuclear Age Series.


“Hollywood and Hitler: 1933-1939″ By Thomas Doherty

October 17th, 2013

Doherty Hollywood and Hitler


A Special Event with Thomas Doherty

September 12th, 2013

American Studies professor Thomas Doherty, author of Hollywood and Hitler 1933-1939, introduces the rarely screened I Was a Captive of Nazi Germany (1936), the true story of of Isobel Lillian Steele, imprisoned by the Nazis for espionage in 1934, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, October 9, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by the National Center for Jewish Film.

dohertyevent


Wednesdya, 3/20, 5 p.m. ” The Suppressed Desires of Mabel Dodge Luhan: Sex, Syphilis, and Psychoanalysis in the Making of Modern American Culture”

March 4th, 2013

March 20, 2013, 5:00 p.m., in Mandel G03

The Suppressed Desires of Mabel Dodge Luhan: Sex, Syphilis, and Psychoanalysis in the Making of Modern American Culture

Lois Rudnick

Lois Rudnick is professor emerita of American Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston, where she taught American literature and culture for 36 years, 26 of which she chaired the American Studies Department. She has published numerous books and articles on modern American culture, and the artists and writers colonies of Santa Fe and Taos, New Mexico, including her multiple award winning Utopian Vistas: The Mabel Dodge Luhan House and the American Counterculture (1996).

This talk is sponsored by the American Studies Program and the Women’s and Gender Studies Program


2/8, 2/9, 2/10 performances of “When Rebellion Becomes Revolution”

January 31st, 2013

We invite you to a very special theatrical event sponsored by the American Studies Program: a full-scale performance of a wonderful documentary play written last spring by the students of Professor Joyce Antler’s Theater As History class, entitled When Rebellion Becomes Revolution: A Play of Protest, Murder, Denial and Atonement. It will be performed again this month as part of ‘DEIS/Impact week: Exploring Social Justice on Campus, in Waltham, and Around the World.

Admission is free, but a full house is expected.

Here are the details:

When Rebellion Becomes Revolution: A Play of Protest, Murder, Denial and Atonement

8 pm, Friday, Feb. 8 and Saturday, Feb.9
3 pm, Sunday, Feb.10 TALK-BACK FOLLOWING THE PERFORMANCE

Schwartz Hall Auditorium

Brandeis Campus, 1970: Students Susan Saxe and Kathy Power catapult to the FBI’s 10 Most Wanted List through their anti-Vietnam War actions. Fifteen actors portray 53-plus historical characters in this original documentary play about a critical moment in Brandeis history. The play was written by Brandeis students in Professor Joyce Antler’s “History as Theater” class in 2012.

Sponsored by Free Play Theatre Cooperative, American Studies Program
For more information: Julian Seltzer (julianseltzer@gmail.com)

Some comments on last spring’s reading:

*I was dazzled. Thank you for a magnificent, powerful, intense, unforgettable experience. The play made me even prouder of Brandeis, with all its complexities.

*SPECTACULAR!!! An amazing accomplishment.

*It was one of my favorite Brandeis events ever. A perfect night. So moving and meaningful.


Auditions for “When Rebellion Becomes Revolution” for ‘DEISImpact

November 27th, 2012

In Spring 2012 Professor Joyce Antler’s History as Theater class wrote the play “When Rebellion Becomes Revolution” and gave a dramatic reading in the International Room, with more than 70 people in attendance and rave reviews. The play lives on and will be part of ‘DEISImpact in February 2013; performance dates are February 8 and 9 and 8 p.m. and February 10 at 3 p.m..

Auditions for roles will be held on Wednesday, 11/28 and Thursday, 11/29 in Luria from 6 p.m.-10 p.m. For more information, please email julianseltzer@gmail.com

When Rebellion Becomes Revolution is presented by the Free Play Theatre Cooperative, the American Studies Program, and ‘DEISImpact.


Thursday, 11/8, 4 p.m. Marc Nobleman lecture “Heroes, With and Without Capes: The Creators of Superman and Batman”

November 5th, 2012

The American Studies Program invites you to “Heroes, With and Without Capes: The Creators of Superman and Batman” with Marc Tyler Nobleman ’94, author of Boys of Steel: The Creators of Superman and Bill the Boy Wonder: The Secret Co-Creator of Batman

As seen in Forbes and USA Today, and heard on MTV, TED and NPR’s All Things Considered.

Writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster co-created Superman and writer Bill Finger was the main mind behind Batman. Yet Siegel and Shuster lived in poverty and anonymity for almost 30 years while Finger died poor and nearly forgotten.
Author Marc Tyler Nobleman (Brandeis ’94) reveals the startling tragedies behind the creators of two worldwide icons.

Thursday, November 8, 4 p.m.
Mandel Reading Room, 303
Light refreshments will be served.

This event has been sponsored by the Martin Weiner Lecture Series.


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