ON THE LIGHTER SIDE WITH LARRY: JUST DESSERTS

Here,  Larry responds to the Writers Guild prompt, “Just Desserts,” in his own wry way.

JUST DESSERTS

by Larry Schwirian

          Alfredo and Ambrosia Bacon were a fiftyish couple who fancied themselves food and wine aficionados. They lived in a high-rise condo in an upscale neighborhood in the heart of the city and frequently partied with friends and acquaintances. These gatherings were often an opportunity for all those gathered to share their recent happenings and boast a little about their latest exploits and discoveries.  Exaggeration was typically the name of the game, but the Bacons were particularly noted for their hyperbole.

At one such get together, Alfredo was bragging about a dinner that he and Ambrosia had recently enjoyed in a new Japanese restaurant, Shogun, in another part of the city. He described in great detail just how delightfully the food was presented and how the aroma of the Kobe beef delicately tantalized his sense of smell and caused him to drool with intense anticipation. He swore that, after the meal, his taste buds were in such a state of existential bliss that he couldn’t conceive of having dessert even though it was included in the cost of this repast. Likewise, Ambrosia went into excruciating detail about her choice: Secret Garden Maki with salmon tempura and a cream cheese center with avocado…and so on, and so on, and so on… she, too, rejected the idea of having dessert. They both waxed longingly about how well the Sake went with the meal and then bored everyone to tears about what a great bargain it was; less than four-hundred-fifty dollars for a complete meal with wine, not including tax and tip. Alfredo raved that a meal of Kobe beef alone typically costs in excess of three-hundred fifty.

Needless to say, the rest of those gathered were somewhat skeptical of the Bacons’ accounting of this bodacious dinner but particularly about its being such a great deal. Trying to be polite, one of the women asked Alfredo about what other delicacies had been included. The men seemed to be quite interested in the list of desserts and asked Ambrosia how she could possibly have skipped hers. As the guests headed home, there was considerable banter about the tale, particularly about its cost.

Shortly after the gathering, the Sunday newspaper featured a review in the Arts and Leisure Section about the recently opened Shogun Restaurant. The food critic was fairly complimentary about the quality of the food but very skeptical about whether the Kobe steak was really what it was purported to be; very few Japanese restaurants in the United States actually import Kobe beef as it is exceedingly expensive. As, at this particular restaurant, the Kobe beef was priced at less than three hundred dollars, he doubted the claim that this item was genuine. The writer was also of the opinion that although the food was decent, it was terribly over-priced. To those who attended the gathering and read the article, it seemed to them that Alfredo and Ambrosia may well have skipped their after meal sweets but did in fact finally get their…Just Desserts.

Frequent “BOLLI Matters” contributor and co-leader of the Writers Guild Larry Schwirian

Architect Larry and his fellow architect wife Caroline live in an historic preservation home in Newton and, together, lead BOLLI courses on architecture.  Larry has been an active participant in  and leader of the Writers Guild special interest group as well as serving on the BOLLI Journal staff.  

WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND? BOLLI Matters

WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND?

Our BOLLI Matters blog provides opportunities for all BOLLI members to share thoughts on the issues of the day, memories of issues of other days,  stand-out BOLLI moments, favorite Lunch & Learn speakers or programs.  You can recommend books, television shows, movies,  and more to your fellow BOLLI members.  Just write about whatever is on your mind, in your own voice–the way you’d talk to your friends.

In addition, it offers “showcase” space in which to try your hand at writing–creative nonfiction, memoir, fiction, poetry.  It gives you a gallery for sharing your photography,  drawing, painting, print making, weaving, furniture making, glass, mosaics…or whatever your particular creative venue is.

You might be surprised to find out how much your fellow BOLLI members appreciate and enjoy your efforts.  And, who knows?  You might surprise yourself and find that you enjoy the process as well–there could be a regular feature or column in your future!

Send items to me, Sue Wurster, at susanlwurster@gmail.com.  I am happy to help by making suggestions for strengthening your work and doing some judicious editing.

And if you have ideas for features or columns that you might like to see in BOLLI Matters, please pass them along!

BOLLI Matters blog master, Sue Wurster

Known in some circles as “Wurster, the Wily Word Woman,” I have happily worked on all things word related–public speaking, acting, writing, working on newsletters and newspapers, editing literary/visual art journals–since creating “The Maple Street Gazette” at age 8…

 

 

 

 

 

MEET OUR MEMBERS: “ACCIDENTAL” ARTIST BETTY BRUDNICK

“ACCIDENTAL” ARTIST BETTY BRUDNICK

By Betty  Brudnick and Sue Wurster

BOLLI member and fine artist Betty Brudnick

 

At BOLLI, our membership includes those from all proverbial walks of life, and yet, we all seem to be very much on the same path—the one leading to personal enrichment.  Betty Brudnick is no exception.  I asked Betty what brought her to BOLLI, and this is what she said.

“My husband Irv and I had been members at HILR (Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement), and at lunch one day, a friend said to us, ‘You know, there’s someone at Brandeis I think you two should meet.  His name is Bernie Reisman.  He is thinking of starting a similar program and would really benefit from any help you could give him.’  So, we met with Bernie, and it wasn’t long before BALI (Brandeis Adult Learning Institute as it was called then) was born.  With the help of other seekers, we built the foundation of BALI, reached out to other retired people, and attracted over 300 to our first informational meeting.  It was an exceedingly hot day, the air conditioning quit, and the power went out—and yet, our overflow audience stayed.  We began courses, twice a week, at the Gosman Athletic Facility taught by friends and other knowledgeable volunteers.  

Discovering that she is truly a BOLLI “original” was pretty exciting–particularly with our 20th anniversary approaching.  But what about your art work? I asked.

In addition to Betty’s career as a social worker, community activist, political junkie, and member of several boards, much of her time and energy has also revolved, of course, around being a wife, a mother, and a daughter to ailing parents.  Art had never really been part of the picture.

“Except for starting to study piano when I was 7 (which continued through my college years,” she says, “I would say that the left side of my brain was dominant.”  She goes on to add that, “My interest in the arts didn’t become apparent until middle age when an accident incapacitated me for several months.  At that point,  I began to examine my life.   And I had an epiphany.”

“I realized that I had spent my life focused on others’ needs, and now, it was time to focus on my own.”  She had always liked creating with her hands—knitting, doing macramé, weaving—but, other than doodling in her notebooks when bored at school, she had never considered drawing or painting.  So, she decided to see if she might have any artistic talent of that sort and enrolled in a drawing class at the MFA.  She loved it, and soon moved on to  a watercolor class, then art lessons in Gloucester, and, finally, working with a watercolor atelier at the Radcliffe Seminars.  “Those were such wonderful years,” she muses.  “Learning, painting, showing work with inspirational artists.”

While she did a good deal of watercolor painting over those years, she continued, of course, to focus on others.  After developing a job bank and doing other projects at the Council on Aging in Malden, Betty says she found herself wanting to explore other forms of creativity as well.

“It seems that nature hates a vacuum,” she indicates, “and so, while I was shopping at the farmers’ market in Sarasota, I stopped at a booth that had some interesting pieces of glass.”  Her conversation with the artist led to an invitation to try her hand at fusing glass herself, and “I found my new avocation.”  Her tutor was a young Greek minister who was also pursuing an advanced degree in theology which, she says, led to  “lots of interesting discussions  while I learned to cut, shape, and fuse glass.”  She soon discovered and joined the Southwest Florida Glass Alliance, a large community of ardent glass collectors in the area, and began to explore both the history of the glass art movement and its artists in this country.  “I was even invited to the homes of many collectors.  How could I resist?”  Ultimately, in addition to doing her own glass work, she began collecting pieces by Italian, Japanese, and American glass artists.

“As far as I know, there were no artists in my family,” Betty says.  “Architects and musicians, yes, but no painters.  My children’s talents lie in other directions—not visual art.  It’s too soon to tell, but one of my granddaughters is an art history major!”

Personally, I can add that, having taught two of those granddaughters, I know that one is a highly accomplished pianist herself.  So, clearly, the piano lessons Betty embarked on when she was 7 tapped into her artistic side–and remain firmly ensconced in the family gene pool.

Overall, Betty indicates, “It’s been rewarding to watch BOLLI’s growth to a year-round community.  Irv would have been so pleased.”  It’s been equally as rewarding to dive into painting and glass work, and she looks forward to whatever avocation comes next.

BOLL Matters editor Sue Wurster

There’s nothing I like more than getting to know the people around me even better!  I hope you’ll leave a comment for Betty in the box below.  It means a lot to each of our profiled members to hear from others.   And I’d love to hear from you about you or other BOLLI members we can all get to know better.