APRIL CHEF’S CORNER WITH JOHN RUDY: NOODLE PUDDING

NOODLE PUDDING

This recipe came from my Grandmother Helen Rudy in about 1965.  She got it from her mother or grandmother.  As is usual with that generation, nothing was written down, so what is here is a tuning of the recipe based on making it–a lot.  Most commercial Noodle Puddings have a higher concentration of noodles, and that certainly can be arranged, but I like it softer and creamier.  Others have raisins, pineapple, and other stuff I don’t like to put in my noodle pudding, but there is no problem adding other ingredients unless they either absorb a lot of moisture or generate a lot of moisture.  If that is the case, moderate the milk to get the consistency you like.  This recipe makes 8-10 portions in a 9” x 13” pan (117 sq in).  A half recipe goes into an 8”x8” pan.  With two of us, the half size works just fine.

9×13 pan      8×8 pan

1 lb                  ½ lb         Cottage Cheese (standard size container)

8 oz                 4 oz        Cream Cheese, softened

4                       2              Eggs, Jumbo (adjust if using a smaller sized egg)

½ pint           ½ cup     Sour Cream

1¼ cup         ⅝ cup     Milk (note that 1/8th  cup is 2 tablespoons)

2½ Tbs         1¼          Sugar

8 oz              4oz         Broad Noodles.  (Note: Some bags are 12oz,                                                        others  are 16oz)

2 Tbs            1 Tbs      Butter

½ cup           ¼ cup     Cornflake crumbs (just pour from box till it is                                                      enough)

shakes          shakes    Cinnamon-Sugar

Except for when there will be a crowd, make ½ of this recipe

  1. Certain recipes require accurate measuring. A noodle pudding does not.  And you might as well play with the ingredients to tune it to your taste.
  2. Cook the noodles for 6-7 minutes, drain, and cool in water. Don’t make them too soft as they will continue to cook as you bake the pudding.
  3. Beat the Cream Cheese, then add the eggs, Sour Cream, Cottage Cheese, and Sugar. If you use “lite” sour cream or cottage cheese it will affect the taste.  Only you will know if you care.
  4. Slowly beat in the milk and then stir in the well drained noodles. It will be very liquid at this point but will thicken during cooking.
  5. Heat the oven to 350°
  6. Melt the butter in a Pyrex pan and make sure that the sides are also buttered. The amount of butter is approximate.  Place the pan onto an edged cookie tray (to collect leakage).  Pour in the pudding material.  This can, in fact, be done hours before the cooking.
  7. Sprinkle the top liberally but not thick with Cornflake crumbs, and then sprinkle with cinnamon-sugar.
  8. Bake, uncovered, ~33 minutes until it browns on the top and it is reasonably solidified. It will not harden in the pan while hot.  If covered it will boil, not bake.  The smaller pan will take 28 minutes.
  9. The pudding can be prepared a day before cooking.

The pudding reheats well in the microwave.

CHEF’S CORNER Feature Writer John Rudy

John says that it was his mother who inspired his love of cooking and baking at an early age.  (She cooked vegetables in boil-able packages.)