Brandeis GPS Blog

Insights on online learning, tips for finding balance, and news and updates from Brandeis GPS

Brandeis GPS Student Spotlight

Student SpotlightHeadshot of Virginia Breese

Virginia Breese ’23

Massachusetts

MS in Bioinformatics

Scientist II, Foundation Medicine

In her spare time, Virginia likes being outdoors – hiking, camping, and even walking from the train in the morning. She’s working on completing New Hampshire’s forty-eight 4,000 footers and is planning a Grand Canyon Rim-to-Rim backpacking trip this winter. She also enjoys crafting and any excuse for a DIY project.

Get to know Virginia Breese!

Why did you choose Brandeis GPS?
I was initially drawn to the bioinformatics program curriculum. The course offerings were very applicable to my specific industry goals. After completing a couple of courses before officially enrolling in the program, I also found that the course format was an ideal balance between independent, collaborative and guided learning.

What inspired you to choose your field of study?
As a wet-lab scientist developing Next Generation Sequencing-based molecular oncology assays, I’ve worked very closely with and learned a lot from my computational biologist and bioinformatician colleagues. These collaborations inspired me to learn more on the data analysis side of my industry.

How have you enjoyed your experience at Brandeis thus far?
The program has been challenging but extremely rewarding. I’ve gained invaluable data analysis skills but have also enjoyed the shared progression along-side my fellow students.

What are your hopes and aspirations for the rest of your time at Brandeis?
As I transition into the electives stage of the program, I’m looking forward to exploring the various ways in which my newly acquired bioinformatics foundation can be applied.

What are your plans for after graduation?
While I think I’ll always enjoy a role in wet-lab experimental design and some time at the bench, I hope to transition a bit more into the computational space, possibly bridging the gap between lab and analytical groups.

What advice would you give to incoming students?
I found that time management is key in completing this coursework, particularly if you’re balancing a full-time career while pursuing your degree. Also, try to embrace the discussion forums with your peers, even though it can be time consuming. Genuinely attempt to process the week’s information as a group. Some weeks you might see something a bit clearer than one of your classmates and some weeks you might need help digesting the material. This dynamic really helps everyone get the most out of the courses and also builds connections despite being fully online.

What has been your favorite class to-date?
This is hard. I value each course I’ve taken so far, each for a different reason. One favorite would be “Molecular Biology, Genetics and Disease” with Drs Ehrenkaufer and Ng. I appreciate the breadth of material that was touched upon in the course, including foundational molecular biology, a bit of coding, and even presentation skills. It was the most engaging fully online course I’ve experienced so far. I also have to mention RBIF111. Despite being the most difficult so far, I’m impressed with how much I learned in that 10-week period.


For more information on the MS in Bioinformatics or any other GPS programs, visit brandeis.edu/gps/.

The Basics of Bioinformatics

The MS in Bioinformatics is one of Brandeis GPS’s fastest growing programs. With a new fast-track option, you can earn your degree in just 15 months. But what is bioinformatics? Who should study bioinformatics? And what career opportunities are available to those with a bioinformatics degree? The following article will break down the basics of bioinformatics and give insight into this emerging field.

What is bioinformatics?

Bioinformatics is a fascinating field at the forefront of medical and pharmaceutical innovation. Using computer technology and other analytical tools, bioinformaticians are able to extract insights from huge amounts of biological data. By analyzing genome sequence data and creating databases and tools to make genomic data more accessible, bioinformatics practitioners are giving scientists and clinicians a better understanding of the relationship between health and disease. Discoveries in the field of bioinformatics have led to the development of new treatments, such as chemotherapy, and the acceleration of vaccinations, such as the COVID-19 vaccine. Insight gained from bioinformatics has also paved the way for personalized medicine, which has the potential to dramatically improve health outcomes in the future.

What kind of background is needed to study bioinformatics?

Bioinformatics is a discipline that combines aspects of computer science, mathematics, physics, and biology. As much of bioinformatics deals with molecular data, individuals interested in pursuing a bioinformatics degree should have completed undergraduate-level coursework in molecular biology or biochemistry. Coursework in statistics, probability or biostatistics is also required. Individuals applying to Brandeis GPS must also meet general admissions requirements to be eligible for the Bioinformatics program. 

What bioinformatics careers are available?

An MS in Bioinformatics opens the door to career opportunities in various settings, including biomedical firms, pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, research institutions, and more. Bioinformatics practitioners may take on a variety of job titles, such as bioinformatics scientist, engineer, computer specialist, analyst, or consultant. Each of these roles entail slightly different responsibilities, but all require a strong understanding of mathematical, statistical and computational methods and the latest bioinformatics tools. 

Job outlooks vary slightly depending on a bioinformatician’s specialization and industry of choice. Bureau of Labor Statistics data reveals that job growth for all occupations that may include bioinformaticians – such as statisticians, data scientists, and computer scientists – is higher than average across occupations. The demand for individuals who can understand and apply insights from genetic data is especially high as more COVID-19 variants emerge and more vaccines are needed. 

Why study bioinformatics at GPS?

Unlike other bioinformatics programs, courses at Brandeis GPS are designed specifically for the Bioinformatics program. The curriculum is influenced by the real-world expertise of our faculty and advisory board members, who are active professionals at the top of their field. Faculty member Dr. Richard Allen, for example, is a Senior Principal Scientist at Pfizer, where he works to apply mathematical and quantitative techniques to address critical uncertainties in the drug discovery and development process. With GPS’s small classes, you’ll have the opportunity to make connections with instructors like Dr. Allen, all while experiencing the convenience of online learning. Our part-time and fast-track options also mean you can choose to pursue your education at the pace that works best for you. With an MS in Bioinformatics from Brandeis GPS, you’ll have the analytical skills and practical knowledge necessary to excel in a field that’s revolutionizing diagnostics and treatments.

For more information about the Brandeis GPS master’s in Bioinformatics, visit the program webpage.

Brandeis GPS Alumni Spotlight

Black and white picture of Kristen MooresAlumni Spotlight

Kristen Moores ’22

Raleigh, NC

MS in User Centered Design

UX Designer, American Kennel Club

When she’s not busy working on a computer, you can usually find Kristen exploring the great outdoors for wild edible mushrooms, enjoying a tasty IPA at a craft brewery, or relaxing with her dog Tig. She’s also an avid traveler and has recently had the opportunity to visit some fantastic places like Portland, Maine; Newfoundland, Canada; Tulum, Mexico; and Lisbon, Portugal.

Get to know Kristen Moores! 

Why did you decide to pursue a master’s degree?

I love working with technology and seeing how people interact with it. I’ve always been curious about new technologies and how they might shape our future. I was excited about the opportunity to participate in this process and use my skills and knowledge to help create products that would improve people’s lives.

What was your most valued experience at GPS?

I worked on projects that helped me build a strong UX portfolio – this helped me greatly when seeking my first job. I also appreciated the chance to learn from instructors who were seasoned industry professionals with extensive knowledge and experience. Additionally, I found it enriching to collaborate on projects with peers from diverse backgrounds and levels of experience.

How has your GPS degree prepared you for life after graduation?

Sharing my projects with the class was a valuable experience. It was a great way to gain confidence in communicating my ideas and design decisions to a broader audience. In my current job, I often present my research and designs to my colleagues and project stakeholders. Practicing in class was a big help in preparing me for this.

What strategies did you find helpful as you balanced responsibilities in work, school, and life?

Taking one class each quarter while working full-time worked well for me, as I could focus on one subject while keeping up with my job. Time management and planning ahead were vital for making it work. But it’s important to remember that life can throw unexpected curveballs, so feel free to contact your professors for help if you ever need to catch up.

What advice would you give to prospective students?

Brushing up on the basics of design and user research before starting your program is a great idea. A good foundation will help you start strong and make the most of your time in the program. Also, feel free to experiment and play around with different design tools. It’s the best way to learn and grow as a designer – have fun!


For more information on the User-Centered Design MS or any other GPS programs, visit brandeis.edu/gps/.

Faculty Spotlight: Ross Morrone

a family of five huddle together and smile at the cameraFaculty member Ross Morrone teaches courses in both the Strategic Analytics and Digital Marketing and Design MS programs. Ross is passionate about sharing his professional experience with students to give them a unique perspective on marketing, analytics, and more. He earned his MS in Computer Information Systems from Youngstown University. Ross has personal marketing ventures that include his podcast This is Marketing and a YouTube channel to document his family’s summer camping adventures.

What led you to the marketing field?

I started my career in 2006 as a web developer at Youngstown State in Ohio. It might be surprising, but I have no formal education in marketing. At that time the Internet was moving faster than any marketing office could keep up with and I saw opportunities to immerse myself into new trends and technologies that were keeping pace. I wouldn’t say I led myself into the marketing field as much as I would say that it grabbed ahold of me. I fell in love with the idea that through design, marketing, advertising and branding I could help connect customers in a meaningful way to whatever any business was selling.  

What industry trend is currently exciting you?

The focus on data! Data rules the world and I’m excited that there is this trend in higher education that is focused on programming around helping to create professionals that understand how that data impacts everything from marketing to business operations. The challenge is creating teams that can share that data between one another to help improve those operations in a strategic way. 

What are your best hopes for the students in your courses?

My hope when I started teaching was to bring my own professional experiences to my courses and give students a practical understanding of how marketing works. Over the years, I got to see those ah-ha moments in the discussions where I knew they were taking my lessons and applying them to their own careers. At the end of the day, I teach because I believe through my own career wins and losses that I have experience that will help others. I want every student to walk away after 10 weeks with ideas that will help them in their own careers – the best part is I get to see this all the time. It’s really rewarding! 

Any advice for students or alumni who are job searching or preparing for a marketing job search in the near future?

Do not settle on one idea of what marketing is. Marketing is 1,000 different things that make up the whole. Read about new trends, think innovatively and try everything you can. I’ve failed over and over with marketing ideas, not landing a client I wanted to or investing in a campaign that did not turn out well – and I still do all the time. It’s through that process I have a better understanding of why and what needs to be done differently to be successful for whatever business I am working with. It’s easy to feel like you have imposter syndrome in marketing when a marketing strategy doesn’t pan out the way you thought it would, but if you are willing to learn from it you will continue to flourish in your career. 

What is a fun fact about you that Brandeis GPS community members may not already know?

My wife, Steph, and I manage a YouTube channel (@smorervfun) that focuses on following us around when we camp with our kids in the summer. It’s our second YouTube channel that we have (the other is @RandomReviewsHowTos) that we are hoping to monetize next year. Is this a cheap marketing plug? You betcha! But it’s a great way for us to capture those moments with our kids and have others follow along, plus, we have those videos to watch forever. We’ve also made a lot of friends that we get to regularly see at campgrounds that have found us through YouTube and it’s awesome to have that community on the trails! 


For more information on the Strategic Analytics MS, the Digital Marketing and Design MS, or other online master’s degrees available at GPS, please visit brandeis.edu/gps.

Brandeis GPS Student Spotlight

Student Spotlight

Rebecca Davis ‘25

Waltham, MA

Software engineer at Akamai Technologies

Program: Master of Software Engineering

In her spare time, Rebecca loves to play different video games across many different systems. She also enjoys doing custom computer builds for both herself and her friends. Outside of computers, she collect plushes, clay and glass figurines, purses and bags, and video game-related stuff.

Get to know Rebecca Davis! 

Why did you choose Brandeis GPS?

I was sorting through lists of schools with working professional-friendly programs.  I recognized the Brandeis name, and after asking around about the school in general, I learned that Leslie Lamport, a well known computer scientist, had received his PhD from Brandeis. After learning this,  I was certain that I would receive an excellent education in my field from Brandeis GPS.

What inspired you to choose your field of study?

I originally became interested in programming after taking a Visual Basic class in high school.  I had to fill an elective slot and my guidance counselor recommended it, since I was good at math and liked the teacher.  I fell in love and then went on to receive a bachelor’s degree in computer science.  Studying software engineering is the next logical step in working on improving myself as a developer.

How have you enjoyed your experience at Brandeis thus far? 

I was initially hesitant about the course format being completely online.  The GPS folks made it easy for me to see if I liked it before committing, and I’m glad I was able to give it a try.  I’ve very much enjoyed working with other students, professors, and the staff.

What has been your favorite class to-date? 

I’ve only finished Software Testing Techniques so far, so I suppose it would have to be that one.  It was a great experience and definitely helped cement my choice to study here.  I am very much enjoying the class I’m currently taking this session.

What are your hopes and aspirations for the rest of your time at Brandeis? 

I hope to take many classes on subjects that are new to me.  My undergraduate program was a great foundation, but the classes available to me here will help give me experience in the application of current technologies.

For more information on the Master of Software Engineering or any other GPS programs, visit our website.

Brandeis GPS Student Spotlight

Picture of Liza Crystabel Rangel standing in front of a tent in what appears to be a desert.Student Spotlight

Liza “Crystabel” Rangel, ‘23

Los Angeles, CA

Product Manager at CreativEngine

Program: MS in User-Centered Design

Crystabel likes to read, draw, and play the piano in her spare time. However, she is passionate about community building and serving underserved populations. As a daughter of Mexican immigrants, she understands the hardships that marginalized people face. She volunteers doing community clean-ups as well as distributing goods. She is also currently a Chapter Director in Los Angeles for Techqueria, a nonprofit that serves the largest global community of Latine professionals in tech.

She is a true believer that When We Grow Others, We Grow Ourselves.

Get to know Crystabel Rangel! 

Why did you choose Brandeis GPS?
I chose Brandeis for the courses offered in the UCD program. I liked the flexibility of being able to keep working while also studying. I also received strong and positive reviews of the program, which made Brandeis my top choice. I am truly honored to be accepted as a student.

What inspired you to choose your field of study?
I started incorporating a user-centered design process at my current job. The more I learned about UX, the more I fell in love with the discipline and industry.

How have you enjoyed your experience at Brandeis thus far?
My experience at Brandeis has been exceptionally positive. I have enjoyed getting to know my professors and classmates. In addition, the material covered in the courses is highly relevant to the UX field and provides me with knowledge and skills to improve my professional development.

What has been your favorite class to-date?
My favorite class thus far is Design Operation and Leadership with Professor David Lumerman. This course taught me strategies for effective leadership and operational tactics to build teams and manage resources.

What are your hopes and aspirations for the rest of your time at Brandeis?
I am on track to complete my program in Spring 2023. For the remaining time that I am in the program, I hope to help build and foster a community among the students in the UCD Program to help us stay connected, provide resources, and help each other succeed.

For more information on the User-Centered Design program or any other GPS programs, visit our website.

Opportunities for Clinicians in Search of Change

Man stands in front of stone wall and smiles into camera

Jon Azzariti, Program Chair of Health Informatics MS

Jon Azzariti was a recent guest of our Lunch and Learn series, where he gave a talk, “Journey Beyond the Bedside – Exciting Opportunities for Clinicians.” A nurse by trade, Azzariti is the program chair of the Master of Science in Health Informatics at Brandeis GPS, and a Senior Patient Safety Manager at athenahealth.

Azzariti first got involved in Health Informatics when he joined a committee for informatics during his time at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he later began working part of the time as an informatics analyst. 

During his talk, Azzariti explained that clinicians are leaving the bedside for a variety of reasons. One of these reasons is burnout, due to COVID, yes, but also the fact that healthcare is a physically and emotionally demanding profession. This was exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Azzariti added, “I’m a firm believer that burnout is often due to institutional-systemic failures, not personal failures. Folks are asked to do more today with fewer resources.”

He went on to explain that there are other opportunities that exist for folks in these professions if they are looking for a change of pace. This is a topic Azzariti is passionate about. “I’m here to say – there are so many jobs outside of bedside care where you can put your clinical mindset to work and still make a difference.” 

illustrated image of doctor with the title "Near and long-term opportunities" at the top, and subtitles "user experience & design, patient safety, health analytics, health informatics, quality, sales & clinical consulting" surrounding the doctor

These opportunities allow professionals to use their experience and be innovative. Among these opportunities are careers in Health Informatics, Health Analytics, and User Experience and Design. Azzariti believes that “All three of these areas can be hard to recruit for and clinicians can sometimes have a considerable advantage.”

He also encourages people to think about their skillset and desired work environment. “You can also find the right combination for you,” he notes. “For instance, I currently work in patient safety, but it’s really an interesting cross section between patient safety and informatics.

For folks looking to change their career who want to hone their skills, Azzariti says that “Brandeis can help you get to where you want to go.”

He specifically highlights our master’s program in User-Centered Design, along with our master’s certificate in Healthcare Analytics.

Azzariti’s final advice was to make a change if you are feeling burnt out. “If you work in healthcare and are needing a change, there are other options that exist.”


Attend an info session this fall to learn more about the degrees that Brandeis GPS offers, or join us for an upcoming Lunch and Learn featuring guest speakers from various industries starting in January. 

Q&A with Steve Dupree

man smiles into camera

Steve Dupree, Program Chair of Digital Marketing and Design MS

Steve Dupree, program chair of the Digital Marketing and Design MS, has more than a decade of experience helping startups across multiple industries achieve $1B+ valuations through digital marketing and tactical customer acquisition. After receiving an MBA from Stanford University, he dabbled in venture capital before exiting to build companies again. Steve continues to invest in and advise promising entrepreneurs in his free time. In addition, Steve did his undergraduate degree at Brandeis – Go Judges! 

What led you to a career in digital marketing and design?

After graduating from Brandeis with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and economics, I sort of stumbled into digital marketing. At that time, few people knew and no one told me that math and science would be critical for the emerging field of digital marketing. It turned out to be a fun path: digital marketing is an interdisciplinary field utilizing math, economics, psychology, design, computer science, writing, communication and engineering. You use all sides of the brain.

What emerging trends in the field are currently exciting you?

One emerging trend that excites me is the uptick in companies trying to democratize personal data and give control back to individuals. In the past two decades, a handful of well-known companies have dominated marketing channels and been opaque about which data is collected and how it is used. I hope this is starting to change so that we can provide more value to consumers, reduce misinformation and level the playing field when it comes to folks having access to opportunities such as online job postings.

Do you have any tips or tricks for Brandeis GPS community members who are pursuing a job search in digital marketing and design currently or planning one soon in the near future?

When pursuing a job search in digital marketing and design, don’t just apply cold through company websites or portals such as Indeed or LinkedIn Jobs. For hiring managers, it’s difficult to surface you among dozens or hundreds of resumes if they don’t know you. Try to identify the hiring manager(s) and find a mutual contact to introduce you. If that’s not possible, contact them directly with a brief email stating your interest and a relevant question or offer to help on a project. DMD candidates in particular might look at specialized job boards such as jobs.GrowthHackers.com. 

As program chair, what are your best hopes for Digital Marketing and Design students and alumni?

My hope is for you to find a product, service or cause that you truly believe in and use your digital marketing and design skills to scale it up. Most organizations, whether they are for-profits, nonprofits, universities, governments or other institutions have some leaders at the top with really good ideas, but they don’t always know how best to implement those ideas. They need our help. They need people like us who can, for example, take complicated concepts and deliver them to mainstream audiences in meaningful ways. Some orgs prioritize marketing more than others. If yours doesn’t appreciate what you do or lacks the culture to grow, then find another one that nurtures you!

What is a fun fact that Brandeis GPS community members may not already know about you?

I’ve gotten really into board games over the past five years. Some of the games I kickstarted back in 2017 are still arriving and I don’t have space for them! I want to reduce the friction to discovering, learning and playing new tabletop games and there are a few pathways that look interesting. I’m open to exploring other perspectives and exchanging ideas about it.


For more information about the Digital Marketing and Design program or other online master’s degrees available at GPS, please visit brandeis.edu/gps.

Brandeis GPS Sponsors UXPA Boston Annual Conference

Three people stand behind a table with tall Brandeis University signs on either side

From left to right: Director of Admissions Christie Barone, Brandeis GPS Alumni Craig Cailler, and Assistant Director of Partnership Engagement Michaela Henry

Last week, Brandeis GPS sponsored UXPA Boston’s annual conference. The event was a day-long, in person conference featuring networking opportunities, professional development sessions, and several panels and keynote speakers about different topics in the industry.

Our own User-Centered Design (UCD) faculty and board members were integral to the success of the day. UCD faculty member Bob Thomas is President of UXPA Boston. He kicked off the day with a welcome address, and later hosted a group mentoring session. The chair of the UCD program, Eva Kaniasty, was featured on the panel “Design of Design Education,” along with program board members Chris Hass and Lou Susi. 

Four people sit in a row of chairs on a stage, one speaking into a microphone

“Design of Design Education” Panel at UXPA Boston | From left to right: Jason Reynolds, Amy Heymans, Eva Kaniasty, and Chris Hass

Chris Hass is on the board of UXPA Boston as well.

Lou Cimaglia, a Brandeis GPS Lunch and Learn speaker, also gave a talk titled “Content Isn’t A Word: A Team Approach to UX Writing.” His Lunch and Learn – register here! – will be this Thursday, October 20 at 12pm.


For more information on the User-Centered Design program or any other GPS programs, visit our website.

Of reasonable security and other mythical creatures

The blue light from the screen of a half-open laptop lights up the keyboard

Written by: Alain Marcuse, Brandeis GPS Faculty

Imagine you are responsible for cybersecurity at your company. Your mission is to support the business, but you’re among the 90% of security leaders who believe they are falling short in addressing cyber risk, according to the 2021 Security Priorities study by Foundry. You are well aware that threats continue to evolve faster than your budget and/or resources; according to the same study, 54% of CISOs expect no increase at all in their budget next year. 

Against this backdrop, cybersecurity threats are certainly not standing still. According to PwC’s 2022 Global Digital Trust Insights report, more than 50% of organizations expect a surge in reportable incidents, over the 2021 rate. In short, the threat landscape continues to grow more rapidly than the resources available to you. 

But the challenge is not only a “simple” matter of balancing resources against threats. Cybersecurity is an increasingly regulated field, governed by sectoral laws such as HIPAA or industry standards such as PCI DSS, state laws such as in Massachusetts or New York, and even extra-territorial laws such as the European Union’s GDPR. Insurance companies are increasingly imposing their own requirements as well, in order to better manage underwriting risk.

In short, you need to make sure security doesn’t interfere with the business, or slow it down; but your primary responsibility is to maintain the organization’s security, in a context where the threats keep increasing, regulations keep multiplying, but the budget made available to you remains flat. 

You are expected to maintain “reasonable security”, but how do you define that, let alone achieve it? What’s deemed reasonable can well be in the eye of the beholder, and also changes over time. Technology evolution also requires updating the concept of what’s reasonable; what made sense in 2012 does not necessarily make sense in 2022. Consider something as simple as password length. PCI DSS 3.2.1, a standard released in 2018 and which still governs security requirements at merchants that use credit cards, requires passwords to be 7 characters long. In 2022, it is estimated that such weak passwords can be cracked within 7 seconds. Is this “reasonable?” If a breach happens, how will you answer “how could you let this happen?”

The key to resolving this challenge is to regularly take the time to take stock of the threat landscape, and the security program’s ability to confront it, by means of a formal risk assessment – whether conducted internally or by an external party. While most security teams are often stretched simply keeping up with day-to-day challenges, it is important to take the time to look at the broad picture and ensure security strategy and tactics are still aligned to the threats, regulations, and business requirements at hand. A risk assessment will also help with prioritizing what initiatives will be undertaken and why, and what risks will be deemed acceptable, making the program more defensible when discussing it with other executives, the Board, or regulators. 

While regular risk assessments provide a frame of reference to enable an answer to the “reasonableness” question, it is important to remember that the reality is that all security programs will fail, in one way or another, sooner or later. Cybersecurity is a form of asymmetric warfare where the enemy is typically better equipped and less constrained than the defenders. As a result, two key elements must be prioritized: defense in depth, and incident response. 

If you have received a breach notification from a company you work with, you will undoubtedly have noticed that the breach was always the result of a “sophisticated” attack, possibly leveraging a “zero-day” vulnerability. By definition, a “zero-day” vulnerability is one for which no patch currently exists. As of mid-2022, 18 such vulnerabilities came to light just this year. Given the near-certainty that some attack vectors will succeed, implementing a defense-in-depth strategy will help minimize the damage, in a cybersecurity version of James Reason’s “Swiss cheese model” metaphor in describing failure of complex systems.

While a defense-in-depth strategy can help minimize the damage, damage will almost certainly happen at some point; it is here that a well-developed incident response program matters most. This is really not dissimilar to good crisis management practice in any other discipline; a well-prepared, well-rehearsed plan for managing and communicating about a cybersecurity incident will go a long way towards mitigating damage, including reputational damage. 

The concept of “reasonable security” may well be an elusive beast, given it can be subjective and/or defined differently depending on the entity or circumstances in which the reasonableness question is answered. But a security program structured on the foundation of regular risk assessments, deploying a well-considered strategy of defense in depth, and supported by a properly-rehearsed incident response plan, will be more likely to be perceived as meeting a “reasonableness” standard.


Alain Marcuse teaches Cloud Security at Brandeis University, and is the Chief Information Security Officer at Validity Inc.

For more information about online master’s degrees available at GPS, please visit brandeis.edu/gps.

« Older posts

© 2023 Brandeis GPS Blog

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)