The Brandeis GPS blog

Insights on online learning, tips for finding balance, and news and updates from Brandeis GPS

Month: September 2015

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: CIA and U.S Department of State

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Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where: Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and U.S Department of State, in-person recruiting opportunity

For those students in or around the Waltham, MA area, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the U.S Department of State are sending recruiters and expert area professionals to Brandeis in the next couple of weeks to recruit students. In particular, the CIA is looking for students with foreign language, economic and STEM experience.

Please see the recruiting sessions listed below and make sure to register.  You can find a map of the Brandeis Campus here.

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Information Session – all majors and programs

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Tech Information Session

U.S. Department of State Information Session – all students, majors

Make sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

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Special Webinar Event

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This Tuesday, September 22nd at 7pm

Brandeis GPS presents the Special Event Webinar via Adobe Connect

Pitch Perfect™: How to Tailor Your Thought Leadership, Branding and News Outreach to Capture Interest and Build News Stories

Led by Christine Dunn, Founder and President of ArcPoint Strategic Communications

How you pitch a story to the news media can make or break whether or not journalists pick up the story. Maximize your success by understanding the news cycle, the newsroom, the different types and styles of writers, and how to tailor your outreach to best meet the needs of those writers. Understand how a bit of research up front can greatly increase the efficiency and efficacy of your outreach efforts; why aligning strategic communications and public relations with overall business goals is critical to success; and how to evaluate and interact with the media to tell the story you want to tell.

RSVP here

 

 

ChristineDunn-ArcPointWebinar9.22Christine Dunn is an award-winning media strategist who has received global recognition for her multimedia campaigns. In 2014, she formed ArcPoint Strategic Communications to offer media advisory and education services to senior executives. She honed her skills at Bloomberg News, working as a reported, editor and senior manager, in Bureau Chief of Boston, the company’s second-largest market in North American. Christine also serves on the Executive Committee of Tufts University’s Entrepreneurship and Leadership Program Advisory Board.
Connect with ArcPoint Strategic Communications on Twitter at @ArcPointSC and by visiting their website, www.arcpointstrategy.com

Special Event: Connect with Brandeis GPS

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You’re invited to connect with the Brandeis GPS online community in person.

 

Thursday, October 15th, 2015, 6-8 pm EST
in the Faculty Center’s Main Dining Room
Brandeis University Campus
Appetizers and drinks will be provided

 Join the GPS Staff, Instructors, Advisory Board Members, Corporate Partners and Students of the past and present for our second networking event of 2015. Take this opportunity to share business cards, swap industry tales and enjoy some drinks and appetizers, on us!

Brandeis GPS will also be celebrating the launch of two new programs:
M.S in Digital Marketing and Design
M.S in User-Centered Design

 

*All Attendees will receive a raffle ticket for a chance to win a FitBit. If you bring an extra guest, you will receive an extra raffle ticket*

 

Come network and celebrate with us!

RSVP Here

 

 

 

If you encounter problems submitting your RSVP or have additional questions, please email gps@brandeis.edu

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SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: Merck (several positions)

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Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

WhereMerck & Co. Inc, Kenilworth, NJ.

About: Merck & Co. Inc. Kenilworth, N.J., U.S.A. known as Merck in the United States and Canada, is a global health care leader with a diversified portfolio of prescription medicines, vaccines and animal health products. Today, we are building a new kind of healthcare company – one that is ready to help create a healthier future for all of us. Our ability to excel depends on the integrity, knowledge, imagination, skill, diversity and teamwork of an individual like you. To this end, we strive to create an environment of mutual respect, encouragement and teamwork. As part of our global team, you’ll have the opportunity to collaborate with talented and dedicated colleagues while developing and expanding your career..

Positions:

Principal Scientist, Target & Pathway Biology – Cardiometabolics

We are seeking an experienced laboratory scientist with expertise in human genetics and cardiometabolic disease biology to join Target and Pathway Biology group within the department of Genetics & Pharmacogenomics (GpGx) at MRL Boston.  Our mission in GpGx is to leverage human genetics and cutting edge molecular biology technologies to identify and functionally validate novel targets and pathways for therapeutic intervention. The successful candidate will lead a team of biologists providing experimental validation of potential drug candidates.

Principal Scientist, Target & Pathway Biology – Immunology

We are seeking an experienced laboratory scientist with expertise in human genetics and immunological disease biology to join Target and Pathway Biology group within the department of Genetics & Pharmacogenomics (GpGx) at MRL Boston.  Our mission in GpGx is to leverage human genetics and cutting edge molecular biology technologies to identify and functionally validate novel targets and pathways for therapeutic intervention. The successful candidate will lead a team of biologists providing experimental validation of potential drug candidates.

Principal Scientist, Target & Pathway Biology – Neuroscience

We are seeking an experienced laboratory scientist with expertise in human genetics and neuroscience disease biology to join Target and Pathway Biology group within the department of Genetics & Pharmacogenomics (GpGx) at MRL Boston.  Our mission in GpGx is to leverage human genetics and cutting edge molecular biology technologies to identify and functionally validate novel targets and pathways for therapeutic intervention. The successful candidate will lead a team of biologists providing experimental validation of potential drug candidates.

Computational Biologist, Biologics, Genetics and Informatics IT (BGIx),

The Merck Biologics, Genetics and Informatics IT department (BGIx) works closely with the Genetics and Pharmacogenomics (GpGx) group in Merck Research Labs (MRL) to develop novel therapies grounded in human genetics, including the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of clinical genomic biomarkers. The BGIx group seeks to significantly expand its team, by adding three bioinformatics and computational biology experts to support expanding research efforts in this area.
Specifically, we seek individuals to partner with GpGx and assist with:
1) analysis of large-scale human genome sequencing efforts for target discovery,
2) design and analysis of custom sequencing experiments to support target validation (single-cell sequencing, long-read technologies, multiplex screening approaches, etc.)
3) integration and analysis of data from diverse sources including microarray expression and genotyping, NGS-based experiments, flow cytometry, and clinical endpoints, and 4) management of genomic and genetic data from pre-clinical and clinical programs.

Interested candidates should apply using the careers website through the MSD Career Firm conducting the search for these positions

Make sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

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SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: HIMSS

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Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where: Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS), Membership Operations in Arlington, VA

About: HIMSS is a global, cause-based, not-for-profit organization focused on better health through information technology (IT). HIMSS leads efforts to optimize health engagements and care outcomes using information technology. HIMSS produces health IT thought leadership, education, events, market research and media services around the world. Founded in 1961, HIMSS encompasses more than 61,000 individuals, of which 79% work in healthcare provider, governmental and not-for-profit organizations across the globe, plus over 640 corporations and 400 not-for-profit partner organizations, that share this cause. HIMSS, headquartered in Chicago, serves the global health IT community with additional offices in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

Position: Manager, Membership Operations

Consider joining the talented staff at HIMSS as Manager, Membership Operations as we transform health through information technology.   In this newly-created position, you will provide management of the day-to-day operations of Continua and Personal Connected Health Alliance (PCHA) programs. This position works in concert with the Executive Director of Continua to ensure that members derive value from their memberships and that the duties of the organization are fulfilled. Responsibilities include direct member contact to resolve day-to-day and complex issues, development of membership retention strategies, planning and execution of events, support for the PCHA Board of Directors, general operations, and assistance with budgets and strategic planning.

  1. Member relationship management. Communicate with individual members and work to resolve issues. Work closely with the PCHA sales team to drive high (>90%) member renewal rates and counsel members on value of different membership options. Answer incoming correspondence from members, non-members, and potential members. Identify opportunities to enhance the members experience and derive value by proposing strategic partnerships and other ideas to solve members’ business problems. Conduct research and connect members with resources and programs to better utilize membership.
  2. Administrative support for the Board of Directors, Continua Council, and elected Officers. This includes planning and scheduling meetings, participating in discussion, answering questions, and keeping meeting minutes. Assists in preparing budget and forecasts.
  3. Payment and invoice processing. Set billing terms. Validate and process vendor invoices according to HIMSS Finance policies. Track expenditures versus budget predictions and manage vendor contract renewals
  4. Event planning and execution. Work with other PCHA team members to plan Continua member events and summits. Includes identifying speakers, scheduling of resources, budget preparation and planning, hotel and venue booking, and preparation of materials for events. Ensures appropriate speakers are on agenda. If necessary, help to represent Continua at tradeshows and other events.
  5. Strategic advice. Provide insights and data regarding membership trends, industry trends, and best practices to inform the strategic planning of the Executive Director and Continua Officers and Board. Effectively communicate ideas via written and oral communications. Develop new member packages and pricing.
  6. Website and communications management. Working together with Continua’s Marketing team, draft, proofread, edit, and distribute various member and non-member communications. This may include updating non-technical web content, working with industry press, and distributing internal communications to members.

Requirements:

  1. Bachelor’s degree in business administration, management, marketing, informatics or in a healthcare-related field; Master’s degree desirable.
  2. A minimum of five (5) years of related work experience preferably in a professional society, trade association, support organization, or in healthcare management
  3. A minimum of two (2) years of experience in healthcare technology including, but not limited to, mobile health (mHealth), clinical informatics, healthcare information management (HIM), consumer electronics or other health IT experience preferred
  4. Technical understanding of a variety of healthcare and Internet technologies including: Bluetooth and other radio technologies; Internet protocols; application architecture (including a very high-level understanding of APIs, RESTful interfaces, etc.); and healthcare interoperability standards (IEEE, HL7, IHE).
  5. Excellent written and verbal communication skills, effective listener, strong teamwork skills, and superior planning skills, both strategic and tactical
  6. Outstanding interpersonal skills with strong personal integrity and the ability to build collaborative relationships thru demonstrated customer relations techniques
  7. Excellent technical skills; skilled in using the Internet, office communication tools (email), word processing, presentations, spreadsheets, databases, and data analysis
  8. Proactive and able to work with minimal supervision as part of a geographically distributed team
  9. Must have a valid passport and be able to travel internationally; up to 10% travel required.

Interested candidates should apply using the HIMSS careers site here.

Make sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

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Higher Education Must Save Cybersecurity

Higher Education Must Save Cybersecurity

Matthew Rosenquist written by:  Brandeis GPS, Information Security Advisory Board member and Cybersecurity Strategist at Intel Corporation

The demand for security professionals is at an all-time high, but the labor pool is largely barren of qualified candidates.  Various data sources paint a similar picture with estimates hovering around ~70% of security organizations are understaffed, ~40% of junior-level jobs are vacant and senior-level roles are unfilled ~50% of the time.  A lack of security talent, especially in leadership roles, is a severe impediment to organizations in desperate need of staffing in-house teams.

Hiring a quality cybersecurity professional is not as easy as you might think.  Universities are trying urgently to fill the gaps but are having difficulty in delivering the needed knowledgeable and experienced personnel.  Some experts have described cybersecurity as a “zero-unemployment” field.  In fact, the gap is widening, with 2020 predictions expecting the shortfall to reach 1.5 millionworkers.  Adding to the challenge, with demand high and supply low, security technology salaries are going up fast and are far outpacing their IT counterparts.  Specialty positions show strong double digit growth in salary over last year’s figures.  Leadership roles are in great demand as well, with compensation rising to match.  Relief of this situation will only come about by balancing the supply side of the equation.

Barriers to resolution
Higher education institutions and governing bodies are working feverishly to fill the tremendous demand with significant numbers of new security graduates, but serious barriers stand in the way.  Academic structures are not well aligned to the needs of the industry, there is a lack of consistent degree and curriculum standards, and educating students with relevant content, in a rapidly changing field, is proving difficult with traditional practices.

Positions within the industry are constantly evolving, with new roles and responsibilities emerging at a rapid pace.  The titles are changing as are the expectations for education and experience.  A recent inventory of federal job responsibilities showed more than 100 occupation-series which include a significant amount of cybersecurity work, representing ~1.6 million employees or roughly 4% of the workforce.  Adding to the mix are new industry jobs emerging around privacy, big data, internet-of-things, policy, customer protection, product design, testing, audit, investigation, and legal aspects of security.  Education institutions are having a difficult time in aligning the skillsets of graduates with the shifting landscape of what employers truly need at any given moment.

Consistency across different higher education institutions is a separate problem which must be addressed.  A nationally recognized degree in cybersecurity does not exist.  Instead, most programs are customized and can have a vastly different emphasis and graduation requirements depending upon the host university.  There is not even a consensus on which departments such programs should reside. A 2014 Ponemon report showed a variety of academic departments where cybersecurity is situated, ranging from engineering, computer science, library, military, business, and legal studies.  The result are clusters of graduates entering the workforce possessing vastly different sets of educational knowledge and security skills.  This is problematic for both potential employers trying to fill a position and prospective applicants desiring to show competitive aptitude.

Teaching cybersecurity is difficult in of itself.  The technology, threats, and attack methods rapidly shift.  It seems every eight to twelve months, the industry swings to an entirely new focus.  A fellow security professional stated “if they are learning from a book, it is already outdated”.  Traditional rote teaching styles are insufficient to train professionals as they rely heavily on static material.  More dynamic sources of information, and processes to integrate them into the classroom, are needed.  Cybersecuirty instruction must be agile and stay very close to the pulse of what is happening in the real world.

Expectations are not being realized by both recent hires into the field as well as companies who are investing in college graduates.  Students told me it was the last six months of schooling which was most relevant.  Before that, most describe the knowledge as an interesting history lesson, but not very practical.  Learning the fundaments are always required to understand the landscape and establish base skills, but the real value is in the pragmatic application of knowledge to supporting risk mitigation.  I have seen frustration with many companies who have hired graduates, only to discover they are not prepared for day-one.  They are glad to have them as part of the team, but the organization must start near square-one to teach them the current challenges and methods to be successful.  Simply put, both sides expect more.

With the vast differences in programs, teaching backgrounds, and content interpretation, sometimes even the basics are overlooked.  Many graduates don’t understand the practical distinction between obstacles versus opposition.  I have found that most, with the exception of those with a statistical background, don’t adequately grasp the relational difference between vulnerability and risk-of-loss.  Most concerning is how many students have a very narrow viewpoint and overlook how cybersecurity is both a technology and behavioral based discipline.  Far too many technical graduates see security as solely an engineering problem, where the right hardware, software, or configuration will achieve the goal and forever solve the puzzle.  This is just not realistic.  Cybersecurity weaves both technology and human elements together in a symbiotic way.  Only addressing one aspect may improve the situation, but will ultimately fail as an isolated stratagem.  These are fundamental constructs every security professional should be fluent in before entering the labor force.

The solution is apparent
The solution will arrive in three parts.  First, partnerships between higher education and the industry will need to attract more talent into cyber sciences, including women and underrepresented minorities.  The current numbers of students are just not enough to satisfy demand and expanding diversity adds fresh perspectives to creatively tackle difficult problems.

Second, students must be trained with relevant aspects and materials that take into account the highly dynamic subject-matter and environment.  Optimally, this should extend to post-graduates as part of continual learning programs.  The professionals of today also have a role to play.  They must contribute to the growth and security of tomorrow by advising and mentoring students, assisting educators, and contributing to the development of curriculums.  In a recent presentation to educators and academia administrators at the NSF Cybersecurity Summit, I recommended both an expansion of traditional topics and engaging industry practitioners to help provide timely insights and discussions for students.  Teamwork across academia and the private sector is mutually beneficial and will help raise the effectiveness of graduates as they enter the workforce.

Third, the curriculums must be designed to align to the security roles in the market.  An adequate level of consistency across teaching institutions, attesting to a completion of applicable studies is required.  In short, a recognized degree program for cyber sciences must be established.

Progress toward the goal
The shortfall in talent is no surprise as the industry has seen this coming for some time and a number of groups have been working diligently to change the academic system which supports cybersecurity professionals.  The US National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) is a strategic organization tying together education, government and the private sectors to address cybersecurity education and workforce development.  The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) is an international society for computing working to develop uniformed knowledge content for cybersecurity roles.

Working independently, many higher education institutions are taking the initiative to bring in experts to help teach and advise students to deliver more relevant education and better prepare them for the jobs they will be seeking.  They are reaching out to industry professionals to help staff and students stay current on latest trends, research, and best-practices.

The Cyber Education Project (CEP) Industry Advisory Board is leading a national academic accreditation program effort to formally establish a Cyber Science degree and necessary certification criteria.  Institutionally, we should see a formal Cyber Science degree be approved in 2016 to establish consistent guidelines for graduates across the landscape of higher education.

In the meantime however, businesses must adapt to the challenging employment environment.  Hiring of technical and leadership cybersecurity staff will continue to be difficult for the foreseeable future.  Human Resource (HR) departments can play a crucial role in planning and addressing problems.  In a presentation to a Chief Human Resources organization last year, I outlined a number of different areas where HR can facilitate practices to both hold on to good talent already in place and plan accordingly to hire qualified candidates.

HR team must staying on top of competitive salary reviews for current security professionals to insure compensation is at the right level to retain talent in the face of headhunters who are currently circling like sharks, hungry for any opportunity to harvest security professionals.  HR representatives should also be prepared to have candid discussions with managers asking to hire new security staff, as the market price may be misaligned to budgets, compensation disparity could be disruptive to current staffing expectations, and it may take an unusually long time to successfully fill a role.  In some cases, outsourcing may be the best option which should be up for consideration.

Must save cybersecurity
The industry is in trouble as a huge deficit of available professionals continues to grow.  Without well trained personnel, most organizations cannot establish or maintain a sufficient cybersecurity posture.  Academia is the gateway to prepare the next generation of professionals and universities are working purposefully to fill the gaps but are having difficulty in delivering the needed knowledgeable and experienced personnel.  Progress is slow, but inroads are being made by the best of academia.  Cybersecurity may be fought with technology, but it is people who triumph.  We must invest in the future generations of professionals who will carry on the fight.  Higher education must save cybersecurity.

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