The Brandeis GPS blog

Insights on online learning, tips for finding balance, and news and updates from Brandeis GPS

Category: GPS News (page 1 of 16)

Looking back: the growth of Python

Since Guido van Rossum first released Python to the public in 1991, it has become one of the fastest growing major programming languages and established itself as the defacto language among varied scientific communities.

Python is particularly valuable to today’s forward-thinking industries and technologies, including data science and machine learning. Its intuitive platform makes it appealing for new programmers, yet it can also serve as a tool for more complex purposes.

Some of the features of Python include:

  • Minimal keywords, simple structure, and a clearly defined syntax
  • Code that is much shorter than former industry-leader JavaScript
  • A broad standard library that is portable and compatible on a number of hardware platforms
  • A mode allowing interactive testing and debugging of pieces of code
  • Tool customization for efficiency using added low-level modules

Master Python Programming

Brandeis GPS offers multiple online courses that teach the programming language specific to certain industries: Python Programming (FinTech), Bioinformatics Scripting and Python Programming (Bioinformatics), and Python for Robotics and AI  (Robotics). All three courses are available for professional development as long as students can demonstrate previous basic experience with a programming language (or undergraduate-level coursework).

Brandeis GPS offers rolling admission to our 12 fully-online master’s degree programs, so you can apply and be accepted at any time. However, we do have recommended deadlines if you are seeking admission for a specific term. The deadline to apply to our Spring 1 session is Wednesday, December 19. You can apply here. Those interested in taking a course who do not yet wish to pursue a full master’s degree can still take up to two online courses without officially enrolling.

To learn more about GPS courses or graduate programs, check out our website or contact gps@brandeis.edu or 781-736-8787.

Brandeis Innovation Showcase 2018

Discover the innovative ways the Brandeis community is changing the world at the Brandeis Innovation Showcase on Thursday, November 15. Held as part of Global Entrepreneurship Week, the Showcase will include presentations and a reception featuring startups, inventions, social entrepreneurship, and scientific discoveries born out of the labs and classrooms at Brandeis University.

View of Innovation Showcase 2017Participants can network with the researchers, students, faculty and staff who are impacting business, sciences, technology and social sectors. Some of Boston’s leading innovation organizations will have booths that provide more information about their work.

Attendees will have the opportunity to join the entrepreneurial action and vote for a crowd favorite by “investing” in projects. They will experience the Brandeisian innovative spirit while networking with Boston’s innovation community.

Get your tickets for the event here and make sure to use the hashtags #DeisInno18 and #BrandeisInnovates on social media so we can follow along.

Information Security Leadership at Brandeis GPS

With rising technology usage, there has been an inevitable rise in cybersecurity threats and an increased  demand for information security professionals. There is a growing responsibility to protect information as cybersecurity risks can be catastrophic for companies, customers, and careers.

With a Brandeis GPS Master’s in Information Security Leadership, you earn the confidence to attack any cybersecurity situation with leadership and technical savvy.

Brandeis University is ranked #35 among national universities by U.S. News and World Report, so you will have earned a master’s from one of the top universities in the country to lead you through any cybersecurity challenge, and to influence decisions for risk prevention.

Our cutting-edge, industry relevant, 100% online curriculum for professionals will build your leadership abilities and skills in leveraging technical know-how. Since you will learn alongside cybersecurity leaders from many industries in small seminar-style classes with no more than 12 students, your exposure to cybersecurity threats of all kinds will be significantly expanded.

The program will equip you to:

  • Develop a business case for investing in cybersecurity and risk management
  • Inform and influence senior executives to commit to obtaining and maintaining this investment
  • Oversee the planning, acquisition and evolution of secure infrastructures
  • Assess the impact of security policies and regulatory requirements on complex systems and organizational objectives

The 30-credit part-time, online program has six required courses and four electives.

The required courses are Foundations of Information Security, Information Security Management, Principles of Computer Incident Response and Investigation, Principles of Risk Management in Information Security, Information Security and Compliance, and Leading Security in Complex Organizations.

Options for electives include Identity Management and Access Control, Cloud Security, Secure Mobile Applications and Data, Network Security, and Managing Change and Innovation. View all courses offered in Information Security Leadership here.

Those applying to the Information Security Leadership program should have an undergraduate degree with work experience and/or coursework in introduction to networking, introduction to computer science and introduction to computer security.

We hope you enjoyed our cybersecurity series as part of National Cyber Awareness Month.

Brandeis GPS offers a Master’s of Science in Information Security Leadership. The part-time, fully online program prepares graduates for leadership roles in information security with a cutting-edge, industry relevant curriculum that builds leadership savvy and skill in leveraging technical know-how. For more information, contact gps@brandeis.edu, call 781-736-8787 or visit www.brandeis.edu/gps

Governance and the case for bringing cybersecurity out of IT

By Joseph Dalessandro

October is National Cyber Awareness Month, and we’ll be spotlighting cybersecurity content on the blog all month long.

Information security governance is perhaps the most challenging aspect of cybersecurity.

Governance, while not a four-letter word, is often discussed with the same grumble that one uses when speaking about the dentist or aged fish. The basics of governance revolves around the advancement that simple accountability and transparency deters calamity. One cannot predict and avoid all disasters — think volcano here — but at the same time, one cannot grade one’s own homework.

It works well until there is a real test and someone else has the red pen. I think it was the queen of corporate governance, Nell Minow, who said, “watched boards change.” I agree, and would say this observation can be applied all the way down the corporate chain into an organization: those that change are the ones who are watched as objectively as possible.

So what does this have to do with cybersecurity, and why is governance hard in the cybersecurity space? There are a number of reasons for this perception. First, boards have been bamboozled by jargon and an IT executive tier that has been unclear and unsure of what and how to report on security. (For those of you on boards, when was the last time you had a security executive discuss the direct link between spend and the measured reduction of risk?). Indeed, in a Bay Dynamics/Osterman Research survey, “the majority (85%) of board members
believe that IT
and security executives need to improve the way they report to the board.”

While I am not a fan of standards for standards’ sake, the ISO/IEC 38500:2008 Corporate governance of information technology has the following useful definitions:

  • Corporate governance: The system by which organizations are directed and controlled.
  • Corporate governance of IT: The system by which the current and future use of IT is directed and controlled. Corporate governance of IT involves evaluating and directing the use of IT to support the organization and monitoring this use to achieve plans. It includes the strategy and policies for using IT within an organization.
  • Management: The system of controls and processes required to achieve the strategic objectives set by the organization’s governing body. Management is subject to the policy guidance and monitoring set through corporate governance.

Security leaders should tack these definitions to their wall.

When it comes to how security leaders can set the right direction for the board and make sure the Board has the right information for strategic oversight, I think it is a “two-way street.” Boards need to come to the security business and ask questions and security leaders need to come to the Board with improved reporting. Perhaps an improvement would be an approach that keeps the security report separate and distinct from that of technology. For organizations where information security, or cybersecurity, does not report to IT— bravo! You have taken a step toward greater transparency. The inherent mission of IT is accessibility and availability and the inherent mission of security is possession (control), protection and integrity. These missions are often in conflict, and managing them under the same leader (often a technology leader), could result in a Head of Security who does not have the chance to challenge or push back against the IT Executive who writes their performance assessment and controls their compensation.

We can better coordinate, manage and govern our complete security capabilities by bringing cybersecurity out of IT and taking a more holistic approach to incorporating physical and facility security, fraud and loss mitigation, and the other components converging security capabilities, data collection, management, and ultimately governance.

An organization’s board and business management must be in alignment where spend and the use of emerging technology are converging for the business. Security leaders should consider the following approach to champion governance:

  1. Above all, be transparent and accountable. Don’t tell the board what they want to hear or what you think they want to hear (they know when they are being managed). Represent the security program objectively. Characterize how security investments support the delivery of value for the business and supports organizational objectives.
  2. Do the hard work to consistently measure, monitor and report on security risk, and to provide the analysis between security investments and the execution to mitigate or manage risk and reduce or limit potential impact.
  3. Share performance and achievements of security resources — these drive the execution of a program and they are where the rubber meets the road for execution of the security program. Just like other business function, people are what drive success for a security program.
  4. Demonstrate how cybersecurity is aligned with and supports the strategic planning and objectives of the business and the expected business outcomes. Often the inherent conflict between the IT mantra of constant access and availability will be in conflict with cybersecurity’s mission of possession, protection and integrity, but the two do not have to be contentious, but IT needs a peer who can hold IT accountable if needed, not a lackey who does what they are told.

Joseph (Joe) Dalessandro is the program chair of the Information Security Leadership program at Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies, and the Head of Security & Technology Audit and Audit Data Analytics, Australian Unity.

Brandeis GPS offers a Master’s of Science in Information Security Leadership. The part-time, fully online program prepares graduates for leadership roles in information security with a cutting-edge, industry relevant curriculum that builds leadership savvy and skill in leveraging technical know-how. For more information, contact gps@brandeis.edu, call 781-736-8787 or visit www.brandeis.edu/gps.

Faces of GPS: Meet Kathryn Wight – Director of Partnership Engagement

Did you know that Brandeis GPS helps companies develop stronger workforce pipelines?

Kathryn Wight Headshot

As Director of Partnership Engagement, Kathryn works with employers to understand their organizational needs and determine opportunities for Brandeis GPS to help upscale their employees. These corporate partnerships provide tuition scholarships and/or trainings and continual conversation around educational support.

Born and raised in Carlisle, MA, Kathryn received her degree in psychology and criminal justice from North Carolina’s Elon University. Upon graduation, she chose to remain in the south for a while. After spending some time working as a paralegal, she decided not to pursue a law career and made her way to higher education. 

Kathryn spent eight years at The College of William & Mary before her New England homecoming. She first served as the recruitment manager for the school’s undergraduate career center, working with employers to schedule their on-campus visits and planning career fairs. From there, she spent a few years counseling Master of Accounting students and managing employer relations for all master level programs in the Raymond A. Mason School of Business.

In her role at GPS, Kathryn focuses on helping companies envision how an educational partnership with Brandeis can help cultivate a strong employee benefits program. She finds meaning in building personal connections with partners and gaining a better understanding of how GPS programs and courses can help fill the unique needs of each organization she works with.

Kathryn’s favorite part of her job is all the people she gets to meet and learn about companies from startups to large Fortune 500 firms.

Outside the office, Kathryn is a runner who likes to travel and explore different food and wine cultures. She is currently planning a wedding (that is now less than six months away). She is also a dog lover and enjoys spending time with her five-year-old niece. 

Learn more about our corporate partnership options on our website or contact Kathryn Wight at kwight@brandeis.edu or 781-736-8725.

Faces of GPS is an occasional series that profiles Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies students, faculty and staff. Find more Faces of GPS stories here.

Security and the Internet of Things

By Joseph Dalessandro

October is National Cyber Awareness Month, and we’ll be spotlighting cybersecurity content on the blog all month long.

Love it or despise it, the Internet of Things (IoT) has forever altered human thinking and interaction. Increased telemetry from our bodies through wearable tech and app analysis of data about our health and personal space has led to discovery, identification and interactions with others through apps and smart devices that is the new norm. How will this explosion of devices change our mission objective as security leaders and professionals?

The term IoT is generally applied to “endpoint” objects such as devices, wearables, cameras, chips, toys, and other objects that can be accessed through a connection such as WiFi or other carrier signals and interacted with via the internet. Examples that have become pervasive would be FitBit wearable’s, iWatches, Alexa or Google Home devices, Nest thermostats, and medical devices such as insulin pumps. While these devices are limited in capability, often just one or two functions or a binary state of on/off, the numbers of devices and the absence of uniform minimum security standards from manufacturers present a problem (several actually) for our IT departments Infrastructure management and security professional.

We can easily find statistics about the number of devices that have emerged in earnest since 2008. The 2017 Cisco Visual Networking Index provides a comprehensive view of some of those numbers. Two of my favorite highlights from this report include:

  • There will be 3.5 networked devices per capita by 2021 (global population 7.875 times 3.5)
  • IP traffic in North America will reach 85 EB per month by 2021 (And North America will not be the highest trafficked global region)

While I am not sure where that bandwidth comes from (I cannot get great consistently streaming bandwidth for Netflix sometimes), what worries me more is patching, tracking and controlling devices. Now, I am not suggesting we control all devices, but I need to control the ones that are on my network because they will increase the potential surface of attack for our networks by orders of magnitude. The more devices you add, outside of implemented and effective controls, the quicker your organization will suffer a breach. Therefore, if you don’t get roles such as patching right you will be lost under the crushing weight of IoT adoption rates. We have to get the “basics” right to ensure we have a foundation capable of integrating IoT devices. We will also need to assess risk and device configuration and a number of other areas we will not venture into here.

In the world of cyber security, people and data are what we most are accustomed to thinking about protecting and defending against. How do we wrap our heads around the potential problems of IoT where the numbers are so much higher? I would submit that we undertake the following approach:

  1. Get the basics right. There will be a lot of debate about what “get the basics right” means but at a high level, I am referring to:
  • Have a comprehensive security program based on risk, with regular assessments
  • Identify where all your data is located and ensure it is appropriately categorized
  • User access, and privileged access, is controlled and re-certified (access for IoT devices as well)
  • Network traffic is premeditated and segmented and network information is logged and monitored (must also scale)
  • Systems management has KPI’s and documented configuration baselines or employs a CMDB
  • Change Management and patching are religiously observed and followed
  • There is a formal incident management/response process (and adjust and augment IR for IoT)
  • There is a crisis and contingency management plan that is tested and updated annually

Yup, that was just step 1. Get all this right and you can start to think about being able to control IoT in your ecosystem.

2. Determine the level of increased risk, or changed risk, related to data loss or breach from #3.

3. Augment your information management or data governance policies and processes to encompass IoT increased data creation and interaction.

4. Determine the physical limits or extensions of IoT devices. Can users outside your physical location use devices or access devices inside your physical location? Do you need to limit (or attempt to limit) the carrier signal outside your four walls?

5. Hire a competent and qualified leader to bridge between security and IT. Brandeis Information Security Leadership graduates are great candidates.

IoT is a big problem that can seem overwhelming, where unpatched devices can increase your threat surface by orders of magnitude. Remember, getting the basics right will see you treating IoT with the same risk strategy that has allowed you to manage technology risk.

Joseph (Joe) Dalessandro is the program chair of the Information Security Leadership program at Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies, and the Head of Security & Technology Audit and Audit Data Analytics, Australian Unity.

Brandeis GPS offers a Master’s of Science in Information Security Leadership. The part-time, fully online program prepares graduates for leadership roles in information security with a cutting-edge, industry relevant curriculum that builds leadership savvy and skill in leveraging technical know-how. For more information, contact gps@brandeis.edu, call 781-736-8787 or visit www.brandeis.edu/gps.

Image source: https://www.personneltoday.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/8/2015/06/wearable-tech-wearable-technology.jpg

Meet our newest GPS faculty members

The first week of the October session is here and we are excited to introduce the newest Brandeis GPS faculty members. These industry leaders come to Brandeis GPS with expertise and established networks within their fields. We have no doubt that the knowledge and experience they bring will provide for meaningful learning opportunities in the online classroom.

Garrett Gillin – RDMD 110: Principals of Search Engine Marketing

Garret Gillin Headshot

Garrett Gillin, MBA, is a co-founder and Principal at 215 Marketing, a Google Premier Partner agency located in Philadelphia, PA, where he oversees the development and execution of integrated digital marketing initiatives with a concentration on programmatic advertising, marketing automation, and advanced analytics.

Todd Chapin – RUCD 185: Design for Non-screen User Experiences

Todd Chapin HeadshotTodd Chapin is a co-founder and Chief Product Officer at ShopClerk.ai. He has experience in product management and UX, as well as expertise in personal mobility, speech recognition, and e-commerce. He has worked at Zipcar, Audible, and Nuance Communications. He has graduate and undergraduate degrees in Human Factors Engineering from Tufts University.

Ernest Green – RSAN 160: Predictive Analytics

Ernest Green Headshot

Ernest Green MS, MBA, PMP, is Vice President of Data Mining at a large financial institution in Dallas, TX. Prior to this role, he worked as a Data Scientist with General Motors and has 10+ years of diverse analytics experience. He holds multiple college degrees and most recently completed a Master’s in Predictive Analytics from Northwestern University. His research and expertise are in analytics, machine learning, natural language processing and artificial intelligence.

We are so pleased to welcome these new faculty members to Brandeis GPS and look forward to seeing how they bring their expertise to their online classrooms.

Faces of GPS is an occasional series that profiles Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies students, faculty and staff. Find more Faces of GPS stories here.

Cloud Computing

Data hubs are becoming increasingly virtual. According to the most recent annual cloud computing survey by North Bridge venture partners, 50 percent of organizations had either a cloud-first or cloud-only policy and 90 percent used the cloud in some way. As the cloud continues to grow, it is essential that software engineers looking to advance in their field have a working knowledge of cloud-based services.

Brandeis GPS will be offering Cloud Computing as a part-time, fully online course this October. During the 10-week course, students will explore cloud-based services, using internet-based software suites such as Google Docs or Salesforce.com, through platform-based systems (PaaS), such as Microsoft’s Azure environment, that make it easy to focus on developing new apps or services, to complete cloud-based infrastructure (IaaS), such as Amazon’s Web Services.

The course also explores how use of the cloud changes how we “do” IT. Cloud-based services are especially well-suited to Agile development and Lean Startup thinking. This leads to new ideas such as DevOps and “continuous deployment.” In addition, use of SaaS security systems changes how we integrate systems, how we handle identity and access management (IAM), opening up new threats and new opportunities to keep data secure. Finally, the course looks at how the cloud enables us to work with more data than ever before, “Big Data”— NoSQL databases and scalable infrastructure (e.g., Hadoop).

Throughout the course, students will learn how to evaluate the various cloud-based services and how to communicate that evaluation to decision-makers in the organization.

It also includes a hands-on practicum using Amazon Web Services (AWS). Students will explore the most common features of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and how IaaS, overall, differs from older paradigms of systems management and program architecture.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the major categories of cloud-based services and the major trends in cloud computing and be able to explain the impact of cloud computing on the role of corporate IT;
  • Describe new roles and approaches to software development tuned to the cloud, starting with DevOps and the idea of continuous development;
  • Assess specific services, evaluate whether or not they are appropriate to specific challenges, and plan their implementation, where relevant;
  • Describe how the cloud has enabled enterprises to rethink how data are gathered, analyzed, and processed, using NoSQL databases, and scalable infrastructure such as Hadoop;
  • Evaluate security challenges in the cloud and understand current best practices;
  • Successfully carry out backup, system imaging and disaster recovery;
  • Successfully set up, monitor, and maintain a reasonably complex web-based service on Amazon Web Services (the course practicum).

At Brandeis GPS, you can take up to two courses before enrolling in one of our 12 online master’s degrees. If you’re interested in exploring the Master of Software Engineering, or would like to learn more about cloud computing for professional development, contact the  GPS office for more information or to request a syllabus: 781-736-8787, gps@brandeis.edu, or submit your information.

Healthcare Delivery in the U.S.

The healthcare system in the U.S. is made up of both public and private programs. Clinicians, hospitals, patients, insurance plans, and regulators intersect to form a complex, interconnected network. To navigate the U.S. healthcare system successfully, health and medical stakeholders must have a fundamental understanding of the events and policies that have shaped the current environment in which they operate.

Brandeis GPS will be offering Healthcare Delivery in the U.S. during our upcoming October session. The fully online, 10-week course will provide an overview of how the U.S. system has developed, and place a substantial focus on how healthcare data has developed over time and informed changes to the delivery system.

The course examines how health informatics supports, influences, and is influenced by the business side of health care. It is an introduction to health care business systems and models with a particular emphasis on the value of health information technology (HIT) to the organization. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Discuss knowledgeably the state of health care in the United States
  • Evaluate options for measuring health status and financing health care and examine options for
    providing health care both acute and chronic
  • Examine public health care and the role of the government in the delivery of health care
  • Explain the role of information systems in providing health care and measuring health care quality

At Brandeis GPS, you can take up to two courses before enrolling in one of our 12 online Master’s degree programs. If you’re interested in exploring the MS in Health and Medical Informatics or would like to learn more about healthcare delivery in the U.S. to fill a skills gap, contact the  GPS office for more information or to request a syllabus: 781-736-8787, gps@brandeis.edu, or submit your information.

The best discounts for online students

From retail to technology to travel to entertainment, student discounts provide you with many ways to save. At Brandeis GPS, all students receive student ID cards that you can use in addition to your .edu address to obtain discounts. We’ve compiled a list of some of the best discounts available to graduate students:

Retail:

Whether you’re looking for professional attire or something to wear on the weekend, you’ll want to check out the following student deals on clothing and other items:

A with an arrow

AmazonUsing your student (.edu) email, get 6 months of free Amazon Prime Student (trial) then 50% off the annual Amazon Prime subscription fee. Get unlimited free Two-Day shipping as well as special offers and promotions.

EXPRESS: Get 15% off both online and in-store. Simply register and verify your student status with UNiDAYS.

J.Crew:  Get 15% off in-store purchases with a valid student ID.

Tommy HilfigerGet 15% off your online purchase by confirming your eligibility through SheerID.

Nike SwooshNike: Get 10% off your online order by verifying your student details through SheerID.

Travel:

One of the benefits of an online graduate program is that you can do your work from anywhere. For discounts on the go, read about the following student travel deals:

CheapOair.comFind cheap tickets and save big with CheapOair’s student deals and promotions.

Logo for American AirlinesStudentUniverse/American AirlinesStudentUniverse and American Airlines have teamed up to offer students great prices for inexpensive travel. See link for more details.

E-Z Rent-a-Car: Save 10% using the code 7192E. Coupon expires on 01/01/2019. See link for participating locations.

Electronics & Technology:

Technology is essential for students, especially those taking courses online. Here are some top discounts to use for completing coursework and beyond:

Microsoft and window logoMicrosoftStudents can get Office 365 for free (including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, and now Microsoft Teams, plus additional classroom tools) and save $200 on Surface Pro and Surface Laptop plus 10% off Surface accessories.

AdobeGet over 60% off Adobe Creative Cloud All Apps plan in your first year.

DellSave on select computers and earn up to 6% back in rewards through Dell University. Get free expedited shipping on your purchase as well as other exclusive offers.

News & Entertainment:

We know you have a life outside the classroom and may want to take some time to relax and stay updated on relevant news. Here are some ways to stay connected:

Bloomberg Businessweek: Students can get 12 weeks of all-access and digital access for $12.

Round red circle with the economistThe Economist: Students can get 12 weeks of print and digital subscription for just $12.

The New York TimesStudents can save on print and digital subscription. Get 4 weeks free then $1 a week for Basic Digital Access.

The Wall Street JournalGet up to 50% off the annual student rate or pay $15 for 15 weeks.

The Washington Post: All students are eligible for a 50% discount on digital subscriptions. Sign up with your .edu email address and verify with SheerID to activate the Academic Rate.

Green circle with 3 lines and spotifySpotifyPay only $4.99 for Spotify Premium, Hulu Limited Commercials, and SHOWTIME. Simply provide your student email when prompted during registration.

Learn more details and read about other student discounts available here.

 

If you’d like to learn more about other benefits of a Brandeis GPS education, contact our admissions team at 781-736-8787 or gps@brandeis.edu

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