The Brandeis GPS blog

Insights on online learning, tips for finding balance, and news and updates from Brandeis GPS

Tag: Brandeis GPS (page 1 of 11)

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: HARVARD SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where: Work can be done remotely, but the RA should be available to meet in person at the Longwood medical campus at least once a week.

About: The HSPH Microbiome Analysis Core (HMAC) is located in the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health, supports the study of the human microbiome, its interaction with health and disease, and computational methods for data mining and machine learning in large genomic data collections.

More info here: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/hmac/

Position:  Part-time Research Assistant for up to 17 hours a week, without benefits, with potential for a permanent position pending funding. Hourly rate is up to $24 per hour, commensurate with experience.

Position Details: This job will entail work with the Core personnel applying existing microbiome informatics and statistical tools, developed in the Huttenhower lab (e.g. MetaPhlAn2, HUMAnN2) as well as by other groups (UPARSE, QIIME, DADA2), to new human microbiome sequence datasets, including microbial communities assayed in disease, animal models, cross-sectional and prospective human cohorts, and associated clinical phenotype, environmental/lifestyle exposure metadata.

Responsibilities: Analysis of human microbiome data.

Qualifications: 

  • Linux/Unix command line proficiency and programming in Python or R.
  • Preference is given to candidates with experience in ordination and cluster analysis, sequence analysis, and computing clusters (e.g. Slurm manager).
  • Post-baccalaureate or Master level student.

To receive full consideration for this position, candidates are asked to submit a Resume/CV to Galeb Abu Ali at  gabuali@hsph.harvard.edu.

Please make sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

Not subscribed to our blog?

Click here to subscribe!

Meet your enrollment advisor

If you’ve ever reached out to learn more about a course or program at Brandeis GPS, you’ve most likely had a conversation with Christie Barone.

As GPS’s senior enrollment coordinator, Christie works diligently with prospective students to help them decide if online learning at GPS is the right fit for them. She also advises students who have taken GPS professional development courses.

From a relatively young age, Christie knew that she wanted to work with people in a way that would allow her to have a real impact on their lives. Christie grew up in the culturally and economically diverse Framingham, Mass. – formerly the country’s largest town and now a recently-minted “city.” When Christie was in high school and her mom went back to work, Christie received an unexpected opportunity to gain a more nuanced understanding of what it means to be a strong professional woman in a so-called “man’s world.”

Later, while working in Spain as an English teacher with high school students, Christie tapped into and deepened her capacity for patience and empathy as she helped her students learn a new language. She recalls her time working and traveling with her students very fondly, and holds on to the important lessons she learned as their teacher.

Today, Christie relies on these experiences for her work with prospective and non-matriculated students, and has found that sometimes a student just needs to hear someone say: I understand – it’s not always easy…Let’s talk about some possible solutions. Christie finds great joy and satisfaction in seeing a student who was so uncertain about their ability to get their master’s go from enrolling in a single course (just to “test the waters”) to taking that leap and enrolling in a graduate program.

Those who work with Christie know that she is dedicated, compassionate and hardworking. She deeply values her relationships with the students and prospects she advises and seeks to empower others to pursue their dreams.

Faces of GPS is an occasional series that profiles Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies students, faculty and staff. Find more Faces of GPS stories here.

 

 

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: STAKD

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where: Stakd (remote position, but office space is available in Hoboken, NJ and Boston, MA)

About: STAKD is a mobile app to lend and borrow money with your peer network — like Venmo but for loans. Users can create, share, and pay down a personal loan within our app. We have 4 software engineers, 2 non-technical Co-Founders, and are members of 3 prestigious incubator programs that provide us office space in Boston, MA and Hoboken, NJ. Still, our founders based out of New York City.

Position: UI/ Graphic Designer

Position Details:  STAKD is seeking a talented junior-to-senior level graphic designer to design our mobile app from scratch, for both Android and iOS. You’ll have access to our current mockups, which have been user tested, to draw on for UX patterns — but we expect you to inject unique and original UI elements, states, transitions, and animations to result in a simple yet effective consumer product.

Responsibilities:  Design STAKD’s mobile app

Qualifications:

  • Proficient with Photoshop, Sketch and/or Illustrator
  • Experience designing iOS or Android apps
  • Color, typography, and interface design
  • Experience with prototyping
  • HTML/CSS a bonus
Compensation:
From STAKD: We will issue a monthly stipend of $300 to $500 at the onset of this project — but after a 3-month period, we will, additionally, issue an equity stake in our company to engage you as a lead designer and partner. Hourly commitments will be 15/wk. *note this is a remote position and candidates are free to accept concurrent positions — be them full-time, part-time or freelance.

To receive full consideration for this position, candidates are asked to submit a Resume/CV to Adam Zeiff at adam@stakd.io.

Please make sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

Not subscribed to our blog?

Click here to subscribe!

The Top 5 Robotics Trends You’ll See in 2018

Robotics technology has proven to evolve at a rapid pace. In 2015, Uber began testing the first of its self-driving cars, and in 2016 it launched 16 self-driving SUVs in San Francisco. With the innovations of today providing just a small glimpse into future advancements, the robotics industry eagerly has its sight set on 2018. As we roll into the new year, we’ve got our eye on five particular trends that we think could characterize the next robotics wave.

  1. Talent demand & salary hikes for specialized workers – According to data released by research firm International Data Corp’s (IDC) Manufacturing Insights Worldwide Commercial Robotics program, b the year 2020, 35 percent of robotics field jobs will be unfilled as the demand for talent increases, while median salaries in these positions will increase by 60 percent.
  2. Growth in robot-as-a-service (RaaS) – Innova Research predicts that within the next two years, people should expect to see more commercial, service-based robots integrated into a variety of global industries. These specific robots will function as “pay-as-you-go” workers, “according to the service type and the time taken by the service.” By 2020, this model will make up 30 percent of the global robotics market.
  3. Governments will intervene in robotics growth with regulations – With robots potentially displacing humans in certain positions, government action will explore unions, rules, and incentivizing companies to maintain human employees while incorporating robots into their workforce.
  4. More collaborative robots – In less than a year from now, research suggests that 30 percent of all newly produced robots will be collaborative robots. These robots function in tandem with human workers, and by next year, will work three times more efficiently than the same robots of today.
  5. Increase in software-based robots – More and more robots are programmed using cloud-based software that can be shared with and distributed to a diverse range of robots. Robots will depend on software engineers to provide the cloud with information they need to function, like certain cognitive capabilities and skills.

For software engineers seeking to develop an advanced set of robotics technology skills, Brandeis GPS will now offer courses in robotic software engineering in 2018. Learn more.

Brandeis University’s Graduate Professional Studies division (GPS) is dedicated to developing innovative courses and programs for working professionals. GPS offers 11 fully online, part-time master’s degrees and one online graduate certificate. With four 10-week session each year, Brandeis GPS provides exceptional programs with a convenient and flexible online approach. Courses are small by design and led by industry experts who deliver individualized support and professional insights. For more information on our programs visit the Brandeis GPS website.

Not subscribed to our blog?

Click here to subscribe!

Brandeis GPS programs recognized for high quality education, affordability

Education research publisher SR Education Group recently unveiled their latest rankings for top online colleges and universities, and Brandeis GPS received high rankings for its Project and Program Management, Software Engineering, and Strategic Analytics master’s degrees.

The rankings are based on value that prospective students look for in an online graduate program. Against other online schools, SR Education Group found that Brandeis GPS offers the highest academic standards for the lowest tuition rates with its Master’s of Science in Project and Program Management. The full list of GPS rankings is:

GPS is currently accepting course enrollments for our fall session (class begins on Oct. 11) and applications for spring 2018.  Learn more about our courses and programs below.

Not subscribed to our blog?

Click here to subscribe!

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: BOSTON PRIVATE BANK & TRUST COMPANY

Spotlight On Jobs

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where: Boston Private Bank & Trust Company in Boston, MA

About: Boston Private is a leading wealth management and private banking company, headquartered in Boston and serving clients from 34 offices in Massachusetts, California, Florida, Wisconsin, Georgia. Today, wealth is being created by an extraordinary variety of business owners, entrepreneurs, and leaders in private partnerships, nonprofits and every corner of our economy. These busy individuals are Boston Private’s clients, and they each have different priorities and goals for their businesses, families and communities. Boston Private is committed to establishing a close personal relationship with each client in order to provide a sound, custom approach for their very individual needs. And as a leader in both wealth management and private banking, Boston Private has the broad expertise to evaluate your financial life as a whole, and create comprehensive solutions for whatever personal or business financial needs you may have. Boston Private is also deeply committed to the communities in which we live and work, providing financial solutions for affordable housing, first-time homebuyers, economic development, social services, community revitalization and small businesses.

Position:  Deposit Area Trainer

Position Details:  Boston Private is currently seeking a creative, hardworking individual to assist in the design, development and delivery of customized role-based training using a variety of methods with a current focus on eLearning, in-person and virtual training. This is a new opportunity to design training programs from the ground up in a dynamic, collaborative environment with a company at the start of an exciting transformation strategy. The Deposit Trainer will work with subject matter experts (SMEs) to develop sustainable solutions to help ensure new business processes and systems are adopted with minimal impact to daily production.

Responsibilities:

  • Partner with SMEs to design training curricula and programs
  • Assist Business Area Trainer in delivering individual training program goals, overall program objectives and module objectives
  • Develop creative, engaging e-Learning modules for deposit office role based training
  • Deliver instructor-led training on an as-required basis
  • Conduct train-the-trainer sessions
  • Ensure training is focused on increasing the capability of employees to perform in their job

To view additional details on this position, please visit the career portal here!

Requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree with 2-4 years’ experience designing, developing, delivering & evaluating instructional design programs preferred
  • Knowledge of adult learning theory, instructional design techniques & customer service concepts
  • Some travel required
  • Advanced computer (most recent versions of all MS Office products) & Internet skills
  • Experience with Adobe Captivate, WebEx and Camtasia or similar eLearning tools
  • Demonstrated ability to manage to priorities, organize & plan work to satisfy established timeframes
  • Proven ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously
  • Strong communication skills: writing, listening, speaking, comfortable communicating in front of all levels within the organization (virtual and in person)
  • Ability to work both independently and collaboratively with subject matter experts
  • Ability to quickly understand technical subject matter
  • Demonstrate professional and technical writing skills
  • Excellent problem-solving and decision-making skills
  • Ability to think creatively

Boston Private is an equal opportunity employer.

To receive full consideration for this position, candidates are asked to submit their Resume/CV and a Cover Letter on the Boston Private career portal.

Please make sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

 

Not subscribed to our blog?

Click here to subscribe!

Brandeis GPS to partner with inaugural Boston FinTech Week

For the first time ever, the city of Boston will be hosting Boston FinTech Week, a four-day event featuring some of the world’s biggest and brightest financial services institutions and the people behind them.

Sponsored in part by Brandeis GPS, Boston FinTech Week (which runs from September 11-14) is a collection of conferences, networking opportunities, workshops, and more centered on innovation in Boston’s financial services ecosystem. Throughout the week, attendees can expect to be submerged in everything FinTech, from insights and trends in Massachusetts FinTech to the integration of artificial intelligence into financial services institutions. A closing party in the Seaport District hosted by MassChallenge will conclude the weeklong festivities on Thursday evening.

Given the recent launch of our MS in Digital Innovation for FinTech, GPS is thrilled to partner with Boston FinTech Week and have a presence at several events. We hope you’ll join us at the following events (all times are EDT):

All events are free at Boston FinTech Week, but pre-registration is required. If you’d like to learn more about the event and programs offered, check out the event website here. Make sure to RSVP to events featuring Brandeis GPS faces so that you can reach out and talk to us, and don’t forget share your experience using the hashtag #BostonFinTechWeek.

“Where everybody knows your name”

By Nicole Russo

I don’t think that I realized this at the time, but a major contributing factor in my pursuit of a career in higher education was community. In my own undergraduate experience, I felt support from my fellow peers, as well as mentorship and guidance from the faculty and staff. I had not experienced this same sense of belonging in a school community before and consequently, I really cherished it.

When it came time to graduate and decide upon a first job, I realized that I never wanted to leave the college setting. And I didn’t. I spent the next five years doing work in admissions and student affairs on various college campuses in the Boston area. I had the opportunity to work with different student age groups and within a variety of campus cultures.

Similar to my undergrad self, a value that I have seen within all student demographics is a desire to belong and to find our place in the grand scheme. In choosing to pursue higher education, we all put so much on the line. Our time, our financial resources, our hopes for the future. It’s a vulnerable time of life, whether you are 18 or 68, and it can feel like a gigantic leap into the unknown.

My aim as a student advisor at Brandeis GPS is for my students to feel supported and to never feel that they

are going at it alone. In being enrolled in an online, part-time graduate program, I recognize that being a student is only a singular aspect of a student’s identity. My goal is to approach student advising with this consideration at the forefront and to recognize how the dimensions of our lives intersect. For instance, the birth of a child or the death of a family member has the potential to impact academic performance in a course. I want to be able to know about these happenings, so that we can collaboratively seek out resources and create solutions. I hope to get to know my students as whole people.

Sometimes when I think of community, I think about the NBC sitcom Cheers that depicts a Boston neighborhood bar where “everyone knows your name.” Like the bar regulars in Cheers, I hope that my students similarly feel seen, heard and valued at Brandeis GPS. I am looking forward to accompanying you as you create your community here.

Faces of GPS is an occasional series that profiles Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies students, faculty and staff. Find more Faces of GPS stories here.

From Brandeis, to Brandeis

After starting his master’s as an undergraduate, a Brandeis University alumnus proves that full-time work and graduate school can co-exist.

Three days after graduating from Brandeis University with a BS in Health: Science, Society, and Policy (HSSP) and a minor in Economics, Allan Chuang (class of 2017) enrolled in the university’s Health and Medical Informatics (HMI) program — a master’s of science degree offered through the university’s division of Graduate Professional Studies. Brandeis GPS caught up with Allan to learn more about his new life as a part-time graduate student and what motivated him to continue his Brandeis education.

The first time Allan Chuang learned of Brandeis GPS was through an email sent by the university’s registrar during the first or second week of his senior year. After reading that graduating seniors could enroll in GPS’s online graduate courses, he began researching programs and discovered that the HMI program and Brandeis GPS offered courses that would expand his current access to health policy education.

“I found that HMI is very similar to HSSP and since GPS was offering the program’s intro course, I just decided to give it a shot,” said Chuang.

This past spring, Chuang enrolled in Perspectives on Health/Medical Information Systems. Despite taking four other courses during this last undergraduate semester, he found the workload manageable and enjoyed the flexibility of online learning. In addition to setting aside blocks of study time and finding new coffee shops to work from, he also stressed how discipline and self-motivation were critical to his academic success.

“Taking a GPS course is like going to the gym,” said Chuang. If you go to the gym every day with a routine schedule, you get in the habit of putting in your work.”

After graduating from Brandeis last May, Chuang accepted a position at a travel tech start-up in Taiwan. Despite working 50-60 hours each week, Chuang enrolled in a second GPS course and recently applied and was accepted into the Health and Medical Informatics program.

“People in my classes aren’t just students, they are also very experienced healthcare professionals — some have been in the industry for more than 15-20 years,” said Chuang. “We have very vibrant discussions. It’s a good opportunity to network and get to know people in the healthcare fields.”

Those vibrant discussions are at the heart of each GPS course. Chuang looks forward to the weekly feedback he receives from his instructor, which challenges him to engage even more deeply in peer-to-peer dialogue.

Chuang decided to continue his education at Brandeis GPS because of the university’s dedication to academic excellence and high reputation in the greater Boston area. The fact that students have up to five years to complete their degree, and that Brandeis GPS gives Brandeis alumni a 15% tuition discount on online classes, also motivated him to enroll.

Faces of GPS is an occasional series that profiles Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies students, faculty and staff. Find more Faces of GPS stories here.

Can mono-solution providers survive?

By Mike Storiale

When FinTech began its ascent, single-solution providers opened the door to expertise and simplicity rarely brought to the table by traditional banks. Solutions designed to meet unique needs created excitement from consumers and investors alike.

Throughout the industry, experts discussed the need for an open architecture from banks and FinTechs to empower customers to build a set of financial solutions that worked best for them. As the industry matured, however, it became apparent that a more rudimentary problem was holding FinTechs back – a balanced business model.

Over the past 25 years, we’ve witnessed the rise and fall of innovative companies that created a single solution with little diversification. The dot-com crash in the early 2000’s was full of well-intentioned problem-solvers who built great organizations, but lacked the contingency plan a balanced product offering affords. They were flying high without a net.

Customers Are Finicky

The mono-solution business model that most FinTechs chose excited customers who could relate to specific problems they felt their banks were not solving. When early entrants offered a better way to send money and alternative lending options, as well as simpler checking accounts, they seemed attractive in an industry that traditionally ignored outcries from its customers for better products.

Moreover, customers had often been plagued with the decision fatigue that came with traditional banks’ offerings of multiple variations of each product, few of which fit anyone perfectly.

But while consumers were willing to try new products that FinTechs brought to the table, they remained reluctant to leave the mainstream banking system for a new financial lifestyle. For banks, this gave them the opportunity to win customers back as they developed complementing products to compete with the innovators creeping in on their space.

Even though research showed that few consumers ever felt “warm” with their bank, often ranking them just slightly less hated than airlines and cable companies, it was difficult to leave the one-stop-shop that was completely intertwined with their everyday lives. Though cobbling your perfect financial offering together sounds utopian, for most consumers it was simply more work than they were willing to take on.

A Risky Model

While the boon of the early years may make some think otherwise, FinTech is not immune to typical business risks. One of the core rules of business is to diversify your product offering to protect yourself, though when we begin new technology ventures, we often believe that we will be able to succeed on a single solution. FinTech’s rise began during a time filled with historically low interest rates, massive changes in regulation, and a consumer base willing to try new things.

While this opened the door for success, it also meant that it mattered less if a start-up’s balance sheet was diversified enough to withstand market fluctuations, because fluctuations simply weren’t happening. Solutions that focused on lending to consumers outside of the traditional market didn’t have to experience the risks of a volatile rate environment. As the inevitable becomes reality, however, speculation circulates as to whether an unbalanced offering can withstand the storms the financial industry often faces.

In addition to market risks, the gap is narrowing in the “tortoise and the hare” race between FinTechs and Bank’s. Even the smallest banks have begun investing money into innovation, while the ones with significant capital have started entire technology hubs and enacted strategies to acquire their biggest tech challengers.

Although big banks continue to face regulatory scrutiny of their core business model, they have evolved and learned how to innovate, catching up in the race to grab customers with products that differentiate themselves. At the same time, FinTechs are finding it difficult to maintain the minimal regulatory oversight that enabled the rapid growth seen in the early years of innovation.

Last month, SoFi filed the paperwork to obtain an industrial bank charter, opening the door for the online lender to offer the same core banking services as its mega-bank counterparts. SoFi’s bold step is not the approach taken by all FinTechs, but many continue to look for partnerships with more full-service financial companies to ensure revenues continue to flow, even if their core business falls out of favor.

The Tipping Point

The outlook for the next five years in FinTech growth may closely trend with the growth in new bank charters. While de novo bank growth stalled after 2008, the up-tick in 2015 and 2016 highlights start-ups that believe they can become successful hybrid organizations; part bank, part FinTech.

Still, taking the hybrid path isn’t without its own challenges. Stringent capital requirements, intense regulatory oversight, and the difficulty of growing a balanced product mix can make it unattractive for entrepreneurs and investors alike.

Mono-solution providers should evaluate the future of their revenue stream to determine if diversification can help mitigate their risks in a changing market.  If they are able to take their innovation into new, multi-service arenas, we can expect to see unprecedented growth in the industry.

Mike Storiale is an Adjunct Professor in the Digital Innovation for FinTech program at Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies. He teaches a graduate course on the global economy and the emergence of FinTech. 

Older posts

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)