The Brandeis GPS blog

Insights on online learning, tips for finding balance, and news and updates from Brandeis GPS

Tag: instructional design (page 1 of 2)

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: BOSTON PRIVATE BANK & TRUST COMPANY

Spotlight On Jobs

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where: Boston Private Bank & Trust Company in Boston, MA

About: Boston Private is a leading wealth management and private banking company, headquartered in Boston and serving clients from 34 offices in Massachusetts, California, Florida, Wisconsin, Georgia. Today, wealth is being created by an extraordinary variety of business owners, entrepreneurs, and leaders in private partnerships, nonprofits and every corner of our economy. These busy individuals are Boston Private’s clients, and they each have different priorities and goals for their businesses, families and communities. Boston Private is committed to establishing a close personal relationship with each client in order to provide a sound, custom approach for their very individual needs. And as a leader in both wealth management and private banking, Boston Private has the broad expertise to evaluate your financial life as a whole, and create comprehensive solutions for whatever personal or business financial needs you may have. Boston Private is also deeply committed to the communities in which we live and work, providing financial solutions for affordable housing, first-time homebuyers, economic development, social services, community revitalization and small businesses.

Position:  Deposit Area Trainer

Position Details:  Boston Private is currently seeking a creative, hardworking individual to assist in the design, development and delivery of customized role-based training using a variety of methods with a current focus on eLearning, in-person and virtual training. This is a new opportunity to design training programs from the ground up in a dynamic, collaborative environment with a company at the start of an exciting transformation strategy. The Deposit Trainer will work with subject matter experts (SMEs) to develop sustainable solutions to help ensure new business processes and systems are adopted with minimal impact to daily production.

Responsibilities:

  • Partner with SMEs to design training curricula and programs
  • Assist Business Area Trainer in delivering individual training program goals, overall program objectives and module objectives
  • Develop creative, engaging e-Learning modules for deposit office role based training
  • Deliver instructor-led training on an as-required basis
  • Conduct train-the-trainer sessions
  • Ensure training is focused on increasing the capability of employees to perform in their job

To view additional details on this position, please visit the career portal here!

Requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree with 2-4 years’ experience designing, developing, delivering & evaluating instructional design programs preferred
  • Knowledge of adult learning theory, instructional design techniques & customer service concepts
  • Some travel required
  • Advanced computer (most recent versions of all MS Office products) & Internet skills
  • Experience with Adobe Captivate, WebEx and Camtasia or similar eLearning tools
  • Demonstrated ability to manage to priorities, organize & plan work to satisfy established timeframes
  • Proven ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously
  • Strong communication skills: writing, listening, speaking, comfortable communicating in front of all levels within the organization (virtual and in person)
  • Ability to work both independently and collaboratively with subject matter experts
  • Ability to quickly understand technical subject matter
  • Demonstrate professional and technical writing skills
  • Excellent problem-solving and decision-making skills
  • Ability to think creatively

Boston Private is an equal opportunity employer.

To receive full consideration for this position, candidates are asked to submit their Resume/CV and a Cover Letter on the Boston Private career portal.

Please make sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

 

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“What’s an instructional designer?”

By Lance Eaton

That’s always the first question I get when I tell people that I am an instructional designer (an ID for those of us “in the know”).

It all started when I was 6 years old, and my dad asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I peered up into his face and said with an earnest seriousness that no child should muster, “I want to be an instructional designer.”

Ok, that’s a lie. In my career as an instructional designer, I’ve never met anyone who wanted to become one when they grew up. In fact, many of them, like me, stumbled onto this career and realized they’d come into their calling — and that people would pay them to do something they rather enjoy!

Probably a year before I became an ID, I couldn’t tell you what an ID was. “Ummm…they design instruction?” In 2011, I was teaching full-time as a part-time instructor (or as I called it, the adjunct shuffle), patching together 6-8 courses a semester at six different institutions. Technology was my saving grace in that it helped me implement different and interesting projects without completely losing my mind (or my students’ papers). As a result of some of that work, I was soon asked to present on how I was using blogs, social media and other technology to enhance learning. When an ID position opened up at North Shore Community College, I was encouraged to apply given my skill set both with teaching and learning with technology, but also for my ability to effectively explain this work to colleagues. The rest is, as they say, history (ok, there’s a few more pieces to it, but this is the abbreviated blog-version!).

Helping instructors think about technology and pedagogy is the essence of instructional design. Eventually, I developed a succinct answer to the question above: “I work with instructors to develop online and hybrid courses or utilize other technology in pedagogically sound ways that maximizes learning and minimizes frustration for learners and instructors as much as possible.”

But even that description often needs further explanation. In comparison to the physical classroom, online instructors and students are thousands of hours behind when it comes to experience. Instructors have vast quantities of implicit knowledge about what works and doesn’t work in the physical classroom as a result of their own education, their teaching experience, and disciplinary expertise. However, that implicit knowledge needs to be made explicit in the online environment so that both instructor and student can succeed. This is where IDs come in; helping instructors figure out exactly how they can be effective in this new learning environment. It’s a rewarding opportunity — I get to meet different instructors with unique approaches to teaching and learning that I am then able to share with other instructors for consideration as they make their journeys into the online learning experience.

So with that, I’d like to say that I’m really excited to land at Brandeis GPS with some amazing colleagues and fantastic instructors. I look forward to learning and growing, which, as quintessential life-long learners, is something ID folk love to do.

Lance Eaton is an instructional designer at Brandeis University Graduate Professional Studies. His previous work includes working at North Community College and Regis College as instructional designer. He is currently working on his PhD in Higher Education from University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Upcoming UX webinar: a story-first approach to human-centered design

Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016
2-3 p.m. EDT
Hosted by Lou Susi, Program Chair of the MS in User-Centered Design

louis-susiWhen we design for experience, subtle and peculiar shifts come into play that demand a uniquely compassionate way of thinking about and guiding our practice. This webinar will explore:

  • The benefits of putting story concepts at the center of a human-centered design approach to improve the design process
  • The quality of a total human experience we’re ultimately all creating through our work.
  •  High-level perspectives, philosophies and mindsets pertaining to both design thinking and decision-making

Learn more and register!

#WhatsYourWhy Wednesday with Tara Holderith

We know that pursuing a master’s degree can be overwhelming, particularly for students who work full-time and are already balancing professional and personal commitments. We also know that every student has a unique reason that drives him or her to return to school and complete their degree.

Last fall, we held a scholarship competition and asked our students to tell us their story — their why — behind their decision to enroll in a graduate program. This series will profile our scholarship winners.

Read previous #WhatsYourWhy Wednesday posts here, here and here.

Tara with one of her students

Tara with one of her students

Graduate Professional Studies: I’m here with Tara Holderith, a student in our Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology program. Congratulations on winning our first “What’s Your Why” scholarship! Tell us where you’re from.

Tara Holderith: Thank you! I’m from Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania.

GPS: How many courses have you taken with GPS so far?

TH: I’ve taken four courses. My first term was this past summer, and I took Principles of Online Instructional Design and Professional Communications. In the fall, I took Learning Analytics, which was a new course, and Advanced Instructional Design. This term I also enrolled in two courses.

GPS: Could you tell us about your day job?

TH: I’ve been teaching for 18 years. I am currently a sixth grade mathematics teacher in New Jersey.

GPS: What was the main driver in helping you decide to go back to school to get your graduate degree?

TH: I had both professional and personal reasons. Last winter, our school principal approached me and started a conversation about pedagogy and instructional design. He realized my passion and challenged me to go back to school. At first I was like “with what time?” But after careful consideration and some research, the rest is history.

GPS: What do you hope to gain professionally with this degree?

TH: Professionally, I want to gain more cutting-edge skillsets. My passion is designing innovative pedagogy according to best practices, so I’m hoping to develop even more skills in addition to those I have already learned in just four classes here at GPS.

GPS: Glad to hear! What do you hope to gain personally out of the program?

TH: I’ve come to the program to be a lifelong learner and learning for learning’s sake. I already have a master’s degree so getting another one isn’t going to directly benefit me financially. However, in terms of my personal growth and my desire to continue learning, this was the perfect opportunity for me and it was directly aligning with what I was looking for.

GPS: Awesome! Why do you think you will be successful in graduate school?

TH: I was just having this conversation with one of my supervisors and I said that when it comes to work ethic, there is no limit with me. Time is never an issue because I will do whatever it takes to complete the workload. I do have three children so it has cost me sleep on different occasions, but because I love educating and bettering myself it is really no bother to me.

GPS: Can you think of an example of any course assignment that you have directly utilized in a current or previous role at work?

TH: I was thinking about this question recently, and I’ve come to the conclusion that there are so many different assignments that have actually been relevant. As a mother of three working full-time, time is very limited so I’ve been combining a lot of my work duties with my school responsibilities. I’ve found there is a lot of alignment, which has enabled me to give 100 percent to both my job and school.

GPS: Now a couple of fun questions. What do you like to do outside of work and school?

TH: Two of my children are USA swimmers so I spend a lot of time at swim meets. When I’m not doing that, I enjoy reading anything I can get my hands on, and I like to exercise and hike.

Enjoying nature with family

Enjoying nature with family

GPS: Are you a swimmer too?

TH: I was, but I always say that even though I am not a swimmer now, chlorine still seems to be my perfume and colleagues have even said that they can smell it on me.

GPS: Anything else you would like to add?

TH: Just that I’m extremely grateful to be part of this program. It has been such an opportunity for me and like I said before, I’m doing it because I love learning and so far it has been exactly what I expected plus more. I’ve developed a great cohort of classmates already and I really enjoy the diversity in terms of our professional experience.

Learning Analytics

Data is increasing with the use of learning technologies, and data is being produced at virtually every learning footprint. The next step in the process is to take the data and analyze the connections to improve the entire learning experience.

Learning analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis, and reporting of data about the learners and their contexts for the purpose of understanding and optimizing learning and the environment in which it occurs. [1]

Learning analytics has been around for some time. Its origin can be traced to business intelligence and to predicting consumer behavior. Learning analytics in education has emerged in the last few
decades, and it follows similar analysis and predictive relationships. Learning analytics is growing to keep pace with deciphering patterns from huge data sets to further support and personalize the learning experience.

My interest in learning analytics stems from my research on learning style preferences. The hypothesis was that, if you could determine a user’s learning style preference, then you could optimally display content in a form to best suit the way a learner could interpret it; you could support their success. At that time, most analysis had to be completed prior to the learning, and then you could track users accordingly. Real-time data analysis was in its infancy. The vision then was that, in the future, this could be done via machine learning, with data analysis and dynamically serving up content in a format that learners best understood. Today, those capabilities exist in some learning management systems in the form of learning analytics and adaptive learning.

Currently, most learning management systems are able to track a student’s footprint throughout a course. It can document when a user logs in and logs out, and they can determine the type of content they viewed and for how long. They can also alert students to assignments, assessments and most course requirements, including their status within each course. Some learning systems have dashboards that indicate the students’ progress compared to their expectations and compared to their cohorts’ performance.

 

In my opinion, most learning management systems are good at data reporting, but they fall short in data analysis and in relationships. The challenge is to harness the data and to make reasonable connections, so that meaningful, positive and proactive interventions can be made; ultimately, we hope to improve the instructional process and student success.

Why use learning analytics:

Learning analytics has relevance and usefulness across various groups, including instructors, students, instructional designers and institutions.

Instructors:

Instructors can use learner analytics to gain insight into student progress:

  • Course navigation paths
  • Most popular content
  • Reflection time
  • Problem-solving
  • Measurement of student engagement and participation
  • Assignment and assessment completion

Analytics can also be used as an early warning system for at-risk students; they can trigger appropriate messaging.


Students:

Students can use learner analytics to gain insight into their progress:

  • Seeing their progress and grades
  • Tracking their progress against course requirements
  • Comparing their progress with their cohorts
  • Tracking content and resources

Instructional designers:

As computer technologies develop and more learning components are online, it is essential for learning specialists to evaluate the impact of each emerging technology and to investigate the strengths, weaknesses and appropriate applications for the learners. Sometimes, this is in the form of a retrospective analysis, but increasingly this analysis can be done closer to the time of the event for more agile course adjustments.

Learning analytics can also be used for continuous improvement of the learning design, such as increasing learner engagement, expanding knowledge retention and improving course and program
outcomes.

Institutions:

Learning analytics can be applied at the institutional level for reporting usage trends. In the future, courses could have personality profiles based on course metadata. These items could include tags, such as “projects-based learning,” “discussions,” “hybrid” and “synchronous.” Each metadata tag could also have an associated strength. Each student would also have his or her own evolving learning personality profile.

This data matching would be similar to how Amazon recommends products based on a customer’s purchasing history and behavior. To optimize student success, the recommendation engine architecture could suggest courses that best match the profiles and that mesh with individual learning styles.

Learning analytics—one view but not the whole picture:

It would be short sighted to think that the landscape of learning analytics is only within the confines of an online learning management system. It is increasingly apparent that the majority of learning
occurs outside of the learning management system; it is only the tip of the iceberg. Learning also occurs informally, such as through social media, experiences and discussions. Learning analytics should be inclusive, capturing all learning opportunities. The Experience API (xAPI) has been developed as a mechanism to record and track all types of learning experiences. Ultimately, inclusion of this learning data will broaden analysis and connections. However, in my experience in piloting the xAPI, it is more elusive than reality. It will take time for the experiential footprints to be folded into the mix of the learning data.

Summary:

Learning analytics is not a one-time, one-size-fits-all approach. It is dynamic, as the parts of the system change and grow. Learning analytics is an emerging field that can benefit many; it has the potential of being a significant factor in improving the overall learning experience in educational institutions or in corporate training.

References:

[1] Society for Learning Analytics Research, 2011.

[2] Low, G. (1995). A study of the effects of learning style preference on achievement in a medical computer simulation (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from UMI Dissertation Database (Accession No. ALMA BOSU1 21625699380001161)

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Meet GPS Student Kara Noonan

KaraNoonan-PortraitWant to hear about the Brandeis GPS student experience straight from a firsthand source? Meet Kara Noonan, a current Brandeis GPS student enrolled in the instructional design and technology master’s program. Kara is currently an Associate Media Producer at Pearson.

When she decided to get a graduate degree, Kara knew she wanted an online program that combined instructional technology and instructional design.

So why Brandeis GPS?

“After a great deal of intense research, I discovered that the Brandeis program provided the ideal integration of edtech and instructional design that I searched for, “Noonan said.

So far, it seems like her research and final decision to attend Brandeis Graduate Professional Studies is paying off. The skills learned from the classroom and fellow classmates have helped Kara enhance her overall career at Pearson.

KaraNoonanQuote2

“I learned how to create a goal or outcome in order for a video to have a lasting effect on a learner. With this in mind, I was able to design videos in a more critical manner and assure that the video met a certain expectation.”KaraNoonan-Family

In addition to classwork, online discussions with classmates enabled Kara to gain an overall bigger picture perspective of the instructional design industry as a whole.

“One of my classmates uses a Pearson math lab in their school. Students were able to add their opinions and critiques about the product which provided positives and negatives to a relevant real world device.”

Student interactions like these prove to provide very valuable and eye opening information into real world issues.

Overall, Kara was able to make a smooth transition to the online experience.

“Some aspects are similar to traditional classroom work while others vary greatly. As a quiet student, I find it easier to participate in discussions in an online environment and do not have to deal with the nerves involved with speaking in class.”

KaraNoonanQuote

This seamless adjustment and valuable learning that has already been gained at Brandeis GPS makes Kara quick to recommend this program to her coworkers.

“Having an instructional design backgroundKaraNoonan-Beach is extremely beneficial. The program provides specialization, helps to shape the way you think about organization, and aids in transitioning into the digital world.”

Not only has Kara felt a deep impact from the Instructional Design & Technology program, but her impact was felt in the classroom as well.

 “Kara is an exceptional instructional design student,” said program chair and instructor Brian Salerno. “She has the unique ability to immediately connect and apply the learning material to her own professional environment, and actively harnesses what she learns in order to continuously improve herself and her organization. Through sharing her insights and observations so generously, Kara promoted a more dynamic and interesting discussion among her classmates.”

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SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: New England College of Business-Two Positions

spotlight-CHANGED-300x200SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

WhereNew England College of Business: Boston, MA

Position: eLearning Instructional Designer

The eLearning Instructional Designer role is a professional, team-centered position responsible for the design, development and implementation of online courses in the Canvas learning management system. The eLearning Instructional Designer creates and implements effective online courses, researches and evaluates emerging instructional technologies and tools, and models effective design practices. This position requires an individual to work with a high level of independence, have strong project management, communication and collaboration skills, and a passion for creating innovative educational solutions for students and faculty.

Job Duties:

  • Work collaboratively with Program Chairs, faculty subject-matter experts, and eLearning team members to design, develop, evaluate, implement, and maintain effective online college courses in the Canvas learning management system.
  • Provide instructional design assistance to faculty SMEs, recommending appropriate tools and course design structure.
  • Film and edit video clips and audio files to incorporate in online courses. Identify and edit graphics for use in instructional materials.
  • Manage and complete projects within a specified timeline while prioritizing and working on multiple projects simultaneously. Excellent time management skills are required.
  • Facilitate the sharing of new learning, instructional techniques, and instructional technologies,including emerging technologies in creative and collaborative ways.
  • Keep current on changes to the LMS; deliver pertinent information to the team.
  • Look for ways improve process & procedures; troubleshoot LMS issues as needed

Qualifications: 

  • Bachelors degree in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, or a related field; Masters degree preferred.
  • 3+ years eLearning instructional design experience working with various learning management systems; experience working in higher education a plus.
  • Graphic design and audio/video editing experience required. Experience evaluating, selecting, and/or using emerging instructional technologies.
  • Excellent written, oral, interpersonal, and presentation skills used to communicate effectively with people at varying levels of computer literacy.
  • Specialization in one or more of the following: project management, instructional design, using dynamic and interactive tools, knowledge of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Adobe Creative Suite, Camtasia, Captivate, Photoshop, Web 2.0 tools, Dream Weaver and other related applications.
  • Knowledge of adult learning principles, constructivism, facilitation and learner-centered activities in an online environment preferable.
  • Personal Traits – Ability to be creative, flexible and innovative in course design. Ability to successfully manage multiple projects simultaneously. Strong out-of-the-box thinking is a must. Ability to work collaboratively with Program Chairs and faculty subject matter experts. Demonstrated ability to work both independently and as part of a development team. Willingness to work a flexible schedule that may include some nights and weekends.

To receive full consideration for this position, candidates are asked to submit a Resume/CV and cover letter with salary requirements to the careers site.


Position: Junior eLearning Instructional Designer

The New England College of Business (NECB) eLearning team is seeking an eager Junior eLearning Instructional Designer looking to grow his/her skills and become part of our collaborative team! This position offers the opportunity to work in a fast-paced, innovative, and creative environment. The Junior Instructional Designer role is a professional, team-centered position aiding in the design, development and implementation of online courses in the Canvas learning management system. The Junior ID works closely with the eLearning Instructional Design team to develop necessary multimedia and course resources. The Junior ID collaborates with Instructional Designers and Program Chairs in order to administer the setup of courses for both graduate and undergraduate and assists with Tier 2 help desk support for students and faculty.

Job Duties: 

  • Provide Canvas learning management system support to ensure proper course setup for undergraduate and graduate sessions.
  • Aid in course document maintenance and course integrity.
  • Film and edit video clips and audio files to incorporate in online courses. Edit graphics for use in instructional materials.
  • Design course elements, as directed by Senior Instructional Designer.
  •  Assist team members with new course builds and training projects. Excellent time management skills are required to handle simultaneous assignments.
  • Work with Program Chairs and Instructional Designers to evaluate and update existing courses.
  • Provide Canvas Administrative support and training to faculty, staff, and students as needed.

Qualifications:

  • Bachelors degree in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, or a related field.
  • 0-2 years experience in administrative duties as well as Instructional Design knowledge in an LMS system in Higher Education is preferred.
  • Excellent written, oral, interpersonal, and presentation skills used to communicate effectively with people at varying levels of computer literacy.
  • Detail oriented with evidence of creativity, attention to detail, and collaborative approaches to work.
  • Graphic design and audio/video editing experience is a plus.
  • Knowledge of adult learning theory, instructional design, and/or technology-mediated learning.
  • Interest and willingness to explore new tools and uses of technology to support learning
  • Personal Traits – Ability to be creative, flexible and innovative in course design. Ability to manage multiple projects at once and meets deadlines. Strong attention to detail.

To receive full consideration for this position, candidates are asked to submit a Resume/CV and cover letter with salary requirements to:

Paula Bramante

Senior Vice President, Center for eLearning Excellence

paula.bramante@necb.edu

 

 

 

Please make sure to reference seeing these positions through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

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Education is Open for Business: A Special Event Webinar

 

Education is Open for Business 

RSVP here

Thursday, December 10, 12-1pm EST, via Adobe Connect

Led by Kevin Corcoran, Executive Director of the Connecticut Distance Learning Consortium (CTDLC)

This webinar is an introduction to Open Education Resources and it’s benefits for Faculty and Staff. The webinar will show what types of resources are available, how the licensing and permissions aspect of OER works, and what efforts are being done on a local, regional and federal level. 

KCorcoran

Kevin Corcoran has been the Executive Director of the Connecticut Distance Learning Consortium (CTDLC) since 2011. He joined the CTDLC in 1999 and has been responsible for developing and growing the products and services offered to support eLearning initiatives. Kevin received his B.A. in English from the University of Connecticut and his M.B.A. with a specialization in Technology Management from Walden University.

The community can connect with Kevin via Twitter @kevincorcoran. 

 

Meet the Brandeis GPS Instructional Designers

At Brandeis GPS, we are always working to improve our online courses to be more interactive and collaborative. Meet two of the reasons we are able to constantly improve. Carol Damm & Jennifer Livengood, our instructional design team!

jennifer-livengood

Instructional Designer, Jennifer Livengood

carol-damm

Instructional Designer, Carol Damm

How long have you each been in the instructional design field?

Carol Damm: Before GPS, I was with a  company that developed e-learning for about three years.

Jennifer Livengood: Four years as a full time job, but professionally ten years.

What is your favorite part of your instructional design work?

CD:  It’s hard to narrow it down! I like problem solving.  Instructional design is like being given a blank slate, and for me what’s fun is trying to figure out which is the best approach. So I guess it’s the process of finding out which design works best for a course.

JL: Being creative. It’s in the job title!

What are ways you can use to innovate an online course that you can’t use in an in person course?

CD: Bringing the students a one -on-one interactive experience with a topic.  With an online courses you can actually use tools to help develop students skills and increase collaboration.

JL: You can build things that are individually interactive, so the student gets individual attention. An online classroom is  a place for students to explore through a discussion board. Quiet students can communicate more in a discussion board where they may have been been shy in person. It truly brings out personalities.

JLQuote

Can you tell me about a great experience you’ve had designing GPS courses?

CD: What I like about it the most are the instructors and working with them. I feel like I am a perpetual student because, for many of the courses, I have no experience in most of the instructors’ fields of expertise. I love connecting with them and advising them on how to engage students with the topics and materials in their courses.InstructionalDesign

JL: Working on the professional communications course with Jennifer Drewry. We both brought our own ideas and between the two of us we were able to revise her course and make it more fun and interactive.

Can you tell me an example of a specific improvement you have made to a course and any feedback you’ve received as a result?

CD:  Lately, I’ve made recommendations on how  an instructor can take their topic and create effective discussion questions that will allow students to bring their own experience and knowledge to the discussion. You want the students to bring their ideas into this more social realm and to be as collaborative as possible not only with instructors but with other students.

JL: At a previous job I made the improvement of having the instructors come in and do a video. They weren’t previously in the course. Having the students come in and see their [professor’s] face, hear their voice. The student feedback said they liked it!

CDQuote

What is the most creative thing you have ever done for a course?

CD: Working on developing a presentation, a micro-lesson, that will teach some rudimentary SQL (Structured Query Language) coding. What I want to do is make it interactive so that students will have to put in the right code to get to the next lesson. It’s creative and students really respond well to the interactive lessons. In the past I’ve done some videography work as well as editing. I love that, it’s lots of fun, very creative. The two contribute to a lesson and make it more interesting.

JL: Working with two instructors in the language department and creating interactive games for their courses. Really pushing the limit on some of the software. It was unique and fun for the students. Unlike taking a normal multiple choice quiz where it’s a little boring.

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Brandeis GPS Commencement Wrap-Up

Written by: Kelsey Whitaker, A Senior at Brandeis University

StudentMarshall

Amyntrah Maxwell & Rabb VP Karen Muncaster

On May 17th, to the sounds of “Pomp and Circumstance”, the Rabb School of Graduate Professional Studies‘ class of 2015 donned their caps and gowns and received their diplomas. The ceremony awarded Master’s degrees in various fields  including: Bioinformatics, Health and Medical Informatics, Information SecurityIT ManagementProject & Program Management and Software Engineering. Students sat proudly and  enjoyed the student and main commencement speaker’s words of wisdom for their future.   As working professionals in their respective fields, each degree recipient juggled work, school, and personal  matters in order to earn their master’s degree.

Luis

Student speaker, Louis Rosa III

The student speaker for the day was Louis Rosa III, who earned his Doctor of Medicine from Georgetown University’s School of Medicine and has over 30 years of experience in the fields of neurosurgery and radiation therapy. However, the day of commencement Rosa walked out with a newly earned diploma in Health and Medical Informatics. After all of his experience, why did Rosa pursue his degree from Brandeis GPS? “No matter how many patients I saw, I couldn’t have enough of an impact,” Rosa explained. Rosa went on to explain the impact his new degree would have on his career and his life.

The main Commencement speaker, Curtis H. Tearte, is a 1973 Brandeis graduate and also a  current Board of Trustees member. Tearte has vast experience in technology and business as former director, vice president and general manager of IBM “My experience at Brandeis exponentially changed the arc of my life,” he explained to the graduates. Tearte is also the founder of Tearte Associates, a firm dedicated to seeking out students with academic potential to become Tearte Scholars through his Family Foundation. His advice to the graduates was, “Keep putting out good and it will come back to us tenfold in unexpected ways.”

Commencement speaker, Curtis H. Tearte

In addition to the speakers, the Outstanding Teacher Award Recipient was presented to Leanne Bateman. Teaching at Brandeis since 2007, Bateman serves as Academic Program Chair and a faculty member for Project and Program Management and Strategic Analytics. Congrats, Leanne!

Congratulations to the 2015 graduates! You did it! Good luck in all your future plans and endeavors.

Want to see the live stream of commencement? You’re in luck! Watch it here.

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