How Sami Rovins Manages Self Care (And How You Can Too!)

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Sami Rovins COEX/MS ’21

As a grad student, relaxation can sometimes seem impossible. I’ve found that learning how to relax and unwind is a skill that requires practice! And it’s such an important skill to have. Being able to unplug from school is crucial to maintaining your sanity and a sense of self. I find myself getting “lost” in my Heller-related responsibilities sometimes, but learning to relax and unwind after a long day of classes and assignments has been so valuable. Sometimes, I find myself feeling guilty when I “clock out” and turn my focus away from grad school. But it is so important to remember that taking care of your mental health and engaging in quality self-care will help to improve not only your mindset, but also, ultimately, your work at Heller.

Meditation is easier said than done, but in my experience meditation has been such a valuable tool for self-care. At first, I felt intimidated, but gradually I came to learn that meditation simply requires practice. One helpful meditation tool is an app called Headspace. This app provides meditations ranging in time from as short as one minute to much longer guided meditations. Taking time daily to center yourself and focus on your thoughts can improve your mood, which will help to improve your performance as a grad student.

I also recommend connecting with your classmates outside of Heller. Making connections that revolve around more than classes is so rewarding! Try to find other students with shared interests that don’t involve just your career aspirations and academic goals. A great way to meet people is through the Graduate Student Association. You’ll also be able to meet graduate students from other schools at Brandeis this way. Building relationships is another rewarding way of maintaining your sense of self during times when you might feel lost in a mountain of schoolwork.

Don’t forget to treat yourself! There are plenty of places to eat in Waltham that are perfect for a delicious bite to clear your mind. I love to stop by Kung Fu Tea on Moody Street to indulge in a bubble tea or mango slushee. Or you can hop across the street and grab brunch at another favorite of mine, a restaurant called In a Pickle. A bit farther from campus is another gem, a tiny Mexican spot called Taqueria El Amigo. Taking yourself out for a meal, or enjoying it with a friend, can be truly rejuvenating!

There are many ways to refresh yourself and clear your mind while studying here at Heller. My recommendation is to continually practice this skill. Relaxation and self-care are so crucial to being a good student, a good employee, and a good friend. Make sure to take care of yourself by unplugging and shifting your focus, because it’s too easy to get lost in school-related worries and stress!

What To Do If You’re Waitlisted

This post goes out to all my PhD applicants (at Heller, master’s applicants don’t receive waitlist decisions, although this may be different at other schools). Waitlists decisions are tricky to deal with because it’s not an immediate yes, but it’s also not a definite no. A waitlist decision, at least at Heller, means that you are a strong applicant and we’d be happy to have you, but we just didn’t have the “space” in the program to offer you an admit decision the first time around. That’s not a knock on you, especially this year: because we waived the GRE requirement, we received far more applications than is typical, and we’re aiming to enroll a slightly smaller class. That’s a recipe for a competitive year, so making the waitlist is still quite an accomplishment.

Okay, okay, but what should you do? Well, as frustrating as it is, you have to wait (check out my previous post about the art of waiting). However, there are a few things I would still recommend doing in the meantime, and a few things I would avoid doing.

You should give yourself space to be disappointed. It’s tough to receive anything other than an admit decision, and I completely understand that, especially if the school you received the waitlist decision from was one of your top choices. But… you shouldn’t give up hope. Heller admits students from the waitlist most years, so all is not lost!

You should still keep us updated if there are changes in your professional or academic life that are relevant. If you got a new job, or promotion, or grant, or publication, let us know! It’s not going to instantly turn your waitlist decision into an admit decision, but it demonstrates interest and may influence your position on the waitlist. But… the key here is “if they’re relevant and/or new”. The admissions committee spent time reviewing your application, and they deemed that you were a strong applicant (that’s why you received a waitlist decision!). Having your third-grade teacher or your mom’s cousin’s boss’ nephew place a call or send an email with additional recommendations isn’t likely to sway the committee.

You should make your choice known, and keep checking your email. In terms of making your choice known, that means that you should respond to the waitlist offer as soon as you are able to (after evaluating any other offers you may have received). This tells the committee that you are interested, and may give you a chance to receive an admit decision even sooner since some students decline our offer prior to the response deadline. But… start considering your other options. That may mean accepting another offer and putting down a deposit if your priority is to begin your PhD program this year. On the other hand, if you’re set on a certain program, it might mean starting to prepare yourself to apply again during the next cycle.

Every year, I get emails from students on the waitlist saying how disappointed they are to have not received an admit decision, and every year it breaks my heart. If you’re one of those students this year, let me say to you: You should be very proud of yourself. I’m wishing you all the best, and if you have any further questions, please feel free to reach out!

What To Do If You’re Denied

Hearing “no” is the worst, isn’t it? Believe me, I’ve been there: as a high school student, I got denied for my first-choice college, and again, when I was applying for graduate school, I got my fair share of deny decisions. Even as an adult, there have been a few denials: rental apartments that go to someone else, job interviews I never heard back from. As hard as it is, it bears repeating: getting denied is a part of life. Even the most successful, intelligent, well-spoken, beautiful, wonderful person you know has heard “no” at least once in their life (and probably much more!).

Still. It hurts. It feels bad. Again, I get it. So what should you do if you’ve been denied? And what should you not do? As someone who’s been on both ends of the admissions process (and thus been the one both giving the no and hearing the no), this is my advice.

DO: Take time to be sad. Being upset, or disappointed, or frustrating is entirely normal. Maybe you had your heart really set on this program and have spent the last few months (or even years) daydreaming about what your life at this program would be like. That’s a loss, and it’s okay to feel it. If you’re feeling upset, take some time for yourself to call a friend, write in your journal, watch a bad movie, take a long walk… whatever is going to make you feel better and regroup.

DON’T: Wallow. “But I thought you just said that I should take time for myself?” That’s true, I did, and you should! But the purpose of taking time for yourself is to regroup. We all have dream schools and programs, but the fact of the matter is, there are HUNDREDS of graduate schools in the US to apply to, and THOUSANDS of graduate programs in the world. Maybe this one school didn’t work out, but that doesn’t mean that others won’t. In addition, many students go through many rounds of applying for graduate programs before they’re accepted into the right program for them. The purpose of taking this time off is to renew your dedication, not stay in a slump forever.

DO: Put things into perspective. Being denied doesn’t mean you’re not smart, talented, capable, articulate, etc. The fact of the matter is, many schools are bound by real constraints of how many students their programs can handle, lest they be trying to cram one hundred students into a twenty-person classroom. This year, because many schools eased up on their requirements for application (such as waiving test scores) and because of the economic downturn, many graduate schools received more applications than they would have normally, making admission even more competitive this year. Moreover, it may just be that your research isn’t the right fit with the faculty: that’s not a reflection on you, just an indication that this program wouldn’t be the best fit.

DON’T: Lash out. Sometimes, when we’re upset or angry, the temptation to lash out is there. But now’s not the time to write your admissions contact a long letter demanding to know why you weren’t let in, or to email your recommenders a diatribe saying that they obviously didn’t say enough good things about you. Sit on it for a week; trust me, it’ll keep, and you’ll probably find that you’re a lot calmer with some time and space from it.

DO: Prepare for next year. As I said before, many students go several cycles before being admitted into the right program for them. If you really have your heart set on a particular program, there’s usually no reason you can’t try again the next year. To close, this is the advice that I normally give to students who have been denied who are interested in reapplying in the next cycle:

  • Update your Resume/CV with any experience (s) that you have gained within the past year. Did you get a new position? If yes, tell us what some of your responsibilities are.
  • Update/rewrite your personal statement – Your personal statement is critical. In your personal statement, I encourage you to talk about your specific interest(s) and also identify which faculty member(s) are currently doing similar work. Your statement has to be engaging and has to paint a picture for the committee on why you want to pursue a degree at Heller. Questions to cover: Why a graduate degree? Why now? Why Heller?
  • Letters of Recommendations – Identify strong candidates (individuals whom you have a great working relationship with and can speak thoroughly on your behalf) to write your recommendations. You do not want individuals who aren’t able to speak on your professional background or character to write your recommendation letter.
  • Retaking the GRE exam (if applicable!) – If you feel you could have done better on the GRE exam, you should take it again.

I hope that helps, and remember: whatever emotions you are feeling right now are okay. The question is, how are you going to channel those emotions? I would encourage you to try not to stay stuck in a negative feeling for too long. As someone who has received denials myself, I know that the thing you least want to hear right now is also the truest thing I could tell you: It will be okay.

 

A Week in the Life with Sami Rovins

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Sami Rovins COEX/MS ’21

The new Spring semester started just a few weeks ago, and I’ve got a packed schedule! I’m taking five classes during Module 1, a mix of required MS-GHPM courses and electives from different programs across Heller. It’s my last semester here at Heller, so I wanted to take a big mix of classes before I go.

My Monday morning started with Professor Nandakumar’s class, “International Health Financing”. It was great to start the week with a class taught by a professor with so much experience in the field! Professor Nandakumar also offered us some great advice: He implored us not to focus too much on our grades, but to focus instead on simply learning.

On Tuesday afternoon, I had the first session of an elective course I’ve been very excited about! The class is called “Policy Advocacy, Protest, and Community Organizing”. Professor Bailis made a great first impression — he was excited and friendly and eager to hear from his students about our backgrounds and interests. I’m looking forward to future class sessions because I want to learn how to be a more effective advocate for issues such as reproductive health and racial justice.

Wednesday mornings are for “Monitoring and Evaluation” with Professor Godoy. Having taken another M+E class last year as a COEX student, it’s interesting to see the ways in which this class is similar or different. I like the structure of the class: lots of breakout rooms and an ongoing group project. Group projects are great especially now, when everything is online, because they provide an opportunity to get to know classmates.

On Friday, I’ll have two more classes I’m looking forward to. In the morning I’ll take “Current Issues in Health Care Management” with Professor Gaumer. I’m excited to get more into the details of how to address and remedy problems that can take place in health care facilities. Later, in the afternoon on Friday, I’ll be taking Professor Sampath’s course, “Culture, Power, and Development”, another elective. Having taken Professor Sampath’s class in the Fall semester, I already know I can expect to get happily lost in readings about social theory.

Every student at Heller has their own schedule, and this is just a peek into mine. My days will also be filled up with meeting fellow students for group projects via Zoom, working remotely as a Graduate Assistant for Heller Admissions, and of course, I’ll be keeping busy with readings, assignments, and projects. Last but not least, I’ll also be working on finishing up my Capstone paper for my COEX degree. It’s so crazy to think that in just a few months, I’ll have finished all of it!

Facing Challenges with Doug Nevins

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Doug Nevins BA ’11, MPP ’21

I would not describe myself, traditionally, as someone who has sought out coursework about finance or accounting. As I’ve referenced in prior blog posts, my undergraduate career as an English major did not prepare me directly for certain types of courses I’ve taken at Heller, and in fact, was guided in part by an effort to avoid quantitative coursework. Since beginning grad school, I’ve rediscovered the potential for mathematical thinking and data analysis to actually be fun, and I’ve really enjoyed courses involving data visualization, like Evaluation for Managers and Intro to GIS. 

This semester entails a new kind of challenge, as I am enrolled in not one or two but three courses involving finance and economics – Managerial Accounting, Financial Management, and Public Finance and Budgeting. This schedule, which I would have undertaken as an undergraduate only in an anxiety dream, is one that I have actually been excited about since enrolling in the Social Impact MBA. Working in non-profit settings after college demonstrated to me the importance of financial decision-making and budgeting and the degree to which these considerations are almost more central for managers and analysts in non-profit, mission-driven organizations than in traditional corporate settings. Following politics and policy debates has motivated me to learn more about economics and the role of government economic intervention – for example, I’d like to better understand the details and competing priorities contained within President Biden’s stimulus proposal. I also wouldn’t mind having a better than half-baked take on Gamestop! 

One of the best things about Heller has been the variety of coursework and many skills which they engage. In the MPP and MBA programs, and I imagine in all Heller master’s degrees, writing- and research-intensive classes are balanced with courses in statistics, economics, and finance. Many classes integrate a combination of these skills, since analyzing data AND being able to communicate your analysis effectively is necessary for many management, research, and analyst roles. I’ve found it helpful, as a graduate student in a professional degree program, to redefine my understanding of a liberal arts approach to education – while as an undergraduate I took advantage of academic flexibility to focus largely on humanities courses, in graduate school I’m enjoying the holistic approach taken in my core coursework. While I won’t be offering any stock tips in the near future, I’m excited about this semester and about future coursework in Corporate Finance and other related areas. 

 

What To Do If You’re Accepted

Picture this: after submitting your graduate application, and after waiting patiently for weeks or months, you check your email and there’s an email message from your top choice school. You log into the school’s portal to view your decision letter— and you’ve been accepted!

Okay, what next? You’ve been thinking about this moment for so long that you didn’t plan for what comes after. As someone who has been both a graduate student myself and as someone who now works in admissions, I’ve put together some absolute “must-dos” after you’ve received your acceptance letter.

First, CELEBRATE. I can’t emphasize this enough. Applying to graduate school can be a long and arduous process, and an acceptance letter is a clear stamp of approval that it’s all paid off. So whatever celebrating means to you, whether it’s treating yourself to a nicer-than-normal-dinner, taking a well-deserved nap, posting your acceptance letter on Instagram, calling your mom and all of your friends: do it! You’ve earned it.

Second, learn more. You’re probably yelling at me, “I already researched this school for my application!” That’s true! But professors, students, and alumni are going to be a lot more accessible to you now that you’ve been accepted, so take advantage of that. Most schools are hosting virtual events for admitted students (be on the look-out for more events coming soon at Heller!), so take advantage of that. Reach out to the admissions office for help in being connected to a particular professor, or a current student or alumni. This is really the time to get all your questions answered, so don’t be shy.

Another part of learning more is taking a look at your financial aid package. Yes, this is probably less fun, but it’s so important. Really read the fine print of each package, because every school frames their financial aid differently. Consider what conditions your scholarship has: at Heller, tuition scholarships are not tied to required research assistantships or teaching assistantships because we reward you for the work you’ve already done. However, at many schools, scholarships are dependent on working as a graduate assistant, which may make it difficult for you to work for outside organizations during your graduate program. Similarly, at Heller, scholarships are granted for the full length of your program; other schools might stipulate that your financial aid package is only for the first year or is subject to change. Even the length of the program matters! If you get offers from two schools that each cost $50,000 a year, and one gives you a 50% scholarship, and the other gives you a 60% scholarship, it may seem like a no-brainer to choose the one offering 60%. But if the 60% program is even one semester longer, you’d end up paying $25,000 more!

Finally, start thinking about the next steps. Review your school’s Admitted Student Checklist and start planning what you’ll need to do before next September comes around. Having a rough idea about what’s coming next will help prepare you so that you’re not scrambling in August to get a copy of your vaccination records, request official transcripts from your undergraduate institution, and find an apartment in the span of two weeks. This is especially true if you’re an international student: requesting an I-20 and scheduling a visa appointment can often take some time, so it’s best to start early if you can.

If you’re reading this because you have just been accepted to Heller: congratulations! I’m so excited to welcome you to the Heller community, and if you haven’t already celebrated, go do that right now!

How to Get Ready for Grad School in Less Than an Hour a Day: A Guide by Andrea Tyree

 

A young woman leans against a tree, smiling.

Andrea Tyree, MPP’22

Preparing for graduate school can feel overwhelming. After the high of acceptance passes, you’re hit with some tough questions Where will I live? How will I pay for it all? Am I ready for class discussions?

Personally, that last question hit me hard. I worried that I wouldn’t be as politically savvy or knowledgeable as my classmates. Now half a year in, I can assure my past self—and you—that you are fine. Chances are, if you’ve made it into one of Heller’s graduate programs, you know enough about the issues within your field to get by. But if you’re like me and want to be as prepared as possible, do it in the least stressful way: listen to podcasts.

Okay, I know at least 25% of you just rolled your eyes cause it’s 2021 and podcasts are done to death. I know, I know, I know… But that’s also what makes them so great! No matter what you’re interested in, there’s a podcast for it. Need to up your financial game? There’s a podcast for that. Want to better understand race relations? There’s a podcast for that. Want to watch The Office while you’re driving? There’s a podcast for that (and it’s fantastic).

So if you’re looking to prep for grad school by catching up on current events, history, politics, breakthroughs in medicine or science, or anything else, try listening to a podcast in your spare time! With the help of some of my classmates, I’ve put together a starter list of useful podcasts for incoming and current students:


  1. Up First by NPR

I recommend this for anyone who feels like they don’t have enough time in their day. This 10-15 minute NPR podcast is a great listen while you’re getting ready in the morning. It reviews some of the top (usually national) news stories that will help you feel prepared for that 9:00 am class.

  1. Today, Explained by Vox AND/OR The Daily by The New York Times AND/OR Pod Save America by Crooked Media

If you want a deeper dive into current issues (or hear about more than 3 topics), then any of these podcasts are great alternatives. The episodes run a bit longer (~30 min to 1 hour), but if you want to hear a thorough breakdown of the news, these are three podcasts I recommend.

  1. Worldly by Vox AND/OR Global News Podcast by BBC

Tired of hearing only about American politics? Want to stay on top of what’s going on in the rest of the world? Check out one of these podcasts! Worldly deep dives into the issues by placing them in the context of history and politics, while Global News provides daily updates on various issues.

  1. Justice in America by The Appeal

If you’re interested in criminal justice, then this is the podcast for you. It covers a wide range of topics within the criminal justice system and examines each piece’s impact on impoverished communities and communities of color.

  1. Code Switch by NPR

Truly one of the best podcasts out there. It explains how race affects everything, provides a platform for the most marginalized and underrepresented to speak their truth, and puts it all into a digestible format. If you’ve been wondering how to be a better ally to people of color or understand how their struggles affect all of us, then this podcast is for you.

  1. Adulting by WNYC Studios

Okay this isn’t a serious podcast about politics, social issues, or current events, but I couldn’t complete this list without mentioning one of the most hilarious podcasts out there (imo). If you need a good laugh, want to feel seen as a struggling grad student/adult, or just need a distraction from the state of the world, this podcast is for you. Plus, if you’re not a Michelle Buteau stan, what are you doing?

The Final Stretch: Sami’s Last Semester

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Sami Rovins COEX/MS ’21

After a year and a half at Heller, I’m finally approaching my last semester as a grad student. It can feel sometimes like I have one foot in Heller and one foot out the door. I’m still focused on my assignments and school projects, while also thinking about potential jobs and what my next moves might be. Do I want to move back home to Philadelphia, or try living someplace new? What kind of work environment do I see myself thriving in? What are the next steps I should take to reach my goals?

This is an exciting place to be in my life, but it is also challenging. It can be hard to stay focused and motivated when I’m so close to being finished with my degrees. I keep myself on track in a number of ways. First, I stay as organized as possible so nothing slips through the cracks. I do this with the help of my Google calendar, a journal, and many, many sticky notes. For me, it’s much harder to forget a task if it’s written down on a list!
To keep focused, I also make sure to find the time for self-care and socially distanced time with friends. In the COVID era, it’s so easy to feel isolated, which shifts my focus away from my school work. Seeing friends and engaging in self-care is just as important to maintaining motivation as keeping organized and on schedule. Spending time chatting in a friend’s backyard leaves me feeling refreshed and provides me with a much-needed breath of fresh air. This picks my spirits up, and allows me to renew my motivation so I can get back to work.
I also make time to think about potential future jobs, moving away from Waltham, and starting a new stage of my life. I find that it’s important to set aside this time, otherwise thinking about these topics seeps into the time I need to spend on writing my Capstone paper, for instance. Setting aside time to think about the future, rather than trying to suppress these thoughts, allows me more time to concentrate on the work that still needs to get done.
I know that my last semester at Heller will be difficult for many reasons. The classes will be challenging, I’ll be worrying about future plans, and I’m sure I’ll feel nostalgic looking back on my previous semesters. But I feel prepared knowing that I have the skills and resources to take care of myself and to stay on track.

Putting Your Best Foot Forward: Writing Your Statement of Purpose Part II

In my head, I’ve been calling this post “What a former English teacher can teach you about writing a statement”, because the truth is, even though your statement of purpose isn’t the same as a personal statement, it is still a narrative. You are still telling a story. Your challenge will be to write an engaging and compelling story, while presenting all of your qualifications. So… how do you do that?

Any English teacher will tell you that the backbone of any good story is structure. You could have the most amazing and creative story in your head, but if your reader can’t follow it, your story is ultimately no good. The same goes for your statement of purpose: you could be the most amazing applicant in the history of Heller, but if your statement of purpose doesn’t connect the dots between your impressive resume to why you’re interested in this program, and from this program to your future career goals, it all falls apart. Today, I’m going to share what I think of as “the anatomy” of a good statement of purpose.

Section One: Hook + Introduction

In this section, you want to introduce who you are and what has inspired you to pursue a graduate-level degree. Pretty straightforward, right? Not really. Think of it this way: the committee reading your application is probably reading tens of applications a day, and hundreds over the course of a cycle. Your job in this section is to make yourself stand out. You want to share what made you seek out a graduate-level degree in an interesting and engaging way. That means avoiding cliches like, “From a young age, I have always been interested in x”; instead share a concrete story that shows your interest in x! If your interest really was sparked at a young age (and by the way, it’s okay if it wasn’t!), tell the story of when you first realized it. “I was seven when I noticed that my classmate had holes in her shoes” is a much more interesting opening line than “I have been interested in economic inequality from a young age”. The golden rule here is show, not tell.

Section Two: Why Me?

Next up, you want to begin to lay out what makes you qualified for this program. Don’t repeat your resume verbatim (we have that too!), but focus on the skills and accomplishments that you’ve obtained over the years and be specific. Rather than saying, “I worked at XYZ Organization for five years as a program manager”, say “During my time as a program manager for XYZ Organization, I was responsible for running weekly reports on X initiative and presenting these reports to shareholders, which as a result, significantly strengthened my data analysis and visualization skills”. Some questions to ask yourself while writing: What qualities and skills do you have that show that you would succeed in the program? What do you bring to the program that’s unique? What differentiates you and your viewpoint?

Section Three: Why This Program?

In the previous section, you’ve demonstrated what you already have; in this section, you want to think about what you’re missing, i.e., what you want to gain from this program. This can include what skills you want to gain, what areas you’d like to strengthen, which faculty you’d like to work with, what opportunities you want to take advantage of, and why this program is appealing to you. Again, specifics are key here, so do your research! It’s easy to say “I’m interested in working with Professor X” or “I want to take Y class”; tell us why! Much better to say, “Professor X’s research on health outcomes for rural populations is extremely relevant to my interest in opioid addiction in rural communities” or “Although I have a strong background in quantitative analysis, I am interested in taking the Applied Qualitative Research Methods course in order to develop my ability to ask complex questions about the healthcare system”.

Section Four: Conclusion + What’s Next?

So now you have what led you to graduate school and what you hope to accomplish while in graduate school. This last section is to tie it all together: With the skills that you’ve gained (enumerated in section three), what’s next for you? Ideally, this will underscore the importance of your choice to pursue graduate study.

In general, your first and last sections will probably be a little shorter than your second and third sections, and you may find that your second and third sections might work better blended together (for example, a paragraph about your research interests in the past and what you’re interested in researching while in school, or a paragraph about your professional accomplishments and what your professional skillset is missing), but these are the basic questions that will form the skeleton of your statement of purpose and help guide you as your craft your narrative of what led you to apply, what you hope to accomplish in graduate school, and what your goals are for after you finish.

Andrea’s 2021 Resolutions

A young woman leans against a tree, smiling.

Andrea Tyree, MPP’22

Lately, I haven’t even attempted to make a list of New Year’s resolutions. I’ve had too many years of making grand commitments on January 1st, and by April I can’t even remember what I was supposed to do. I find starting a New Year’s resolution in March to be much more effective. Don’t ask me why. Something about March makes me want to change my life…

But for the sake of grad school (and this blog), this year I will try again! If I learned anything from my first semester, it’s that graduate school can take over your life. It’s easy to let hobbies, self-care, and even old friends fall by the wayside when you’re diving head first into academia. And if you’re one of the many graduate students who also has a job or a child (or both!), then there’s really not much time for anything else.

I’m making these resolutions with us in mind. It’s easy to let the world pass us by while trying to simultaneously get a degree and keep our lives together. Yet we have to remember (and honestly, I’m just talking to myself here) to dedicate time to activities that make us happy, relax us, and overall keep us sane. Who has time for that mid-semester mental breakdown anyway?! Here are my resolutions that (hopefully) will help prevent that:


  1. Spend at least 1 hour every day away from the screens

What a sad goal to start with. But committing at least one consecutive hour away from the screens every day is necessary for grad students (especially for those of us in Zoom university). Although we have to stare at our computers for most of the day, we don’t have to spend every study break watching Netflix, Youtube, or scrolling through social media. It’s fun and oh so mind-numbing, but our eyes need a break. I plan to spend this hour relaxing, listening to music, cooking, spending time with my partner, or doing one of the following resolutions!

  1. Call a friend, family member, or therapist every week

Now I’m not saying speak to the same person every week (unless you see your therapist every week… like me), but talking with someone who’s world does not revolve around endless assignments will help pull you out of whatever funk or anxiety grad school may have put you in. Plus your mother/father/old best friend from high school or college wants to hear from you. Trust me. (Note: this can also be checked off by speaking to a neighbor or coworker—about something other than work—for an extended period of time.)

  1. Go outside every day. Even if it’s freezing. Even if it’s just for 3 minutes. Do it!

That fresh air is necessary! Taking ten deep breaths in fresh air can relieve stress that you didn’t even know you were holding onto. Spending time outside last semester brought me pure joy. But I didn’t do it as often as I could have. This semester, I have a feeling I’m going to need that joy.

  1. Do something that makes me smile or laugh every day.

Sometimes we have to consciously bring joy into our lives. It’s easy forget about it with the responsibilities of work and school. This year I want joy to be a priority in my life. For me, most of the previous resolutions would bring my joy every day. For you it may be different and that’s okay! But trust, a good laugh a day keeps the anxiety monster away.


I hope these resolutions can help you too! Whether you’re a first-year, second-year, or newly admitted student, I think all of us could benefit from starting these habits. Happy New Year!

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