April 17, 2014

An IGS Conversation: Creative Careers in Global Media, Arts, and Philanthropy

Wednesday, April 4

7 pm (6:30 for pizza)

Mandel Center Reading Room (3rd floor)

In a tough job market we are all wondering: what can a college graduate do with a liberal arts degree?  And yet it turns out that companies and organization like liberal arts graduates – especially those with international experience.  A broad education seems to encourage employees to make the creative leaps that drive innovation.

So for our final IGS Conversation we ask: how can studying literature, history, art, politics, and foreign languages help you to launch a career, make your mark – maybe even change the world?

Our featured guest speaker is Michelle Young—blogger, philanthropist, and new media CEO.  Ms. Young studied art history in college and has since carved out a career that blends her interests in fashion, music, urban history, art, and travel.

Ms. Young is the founder and CEO of Untapped Cities, a fast-growing global media brand with offices in New York, Paris, and San Francisco. Ms. Young blogs for The Huffington Post, and has written for The New York Times, Pitchfork, Architecture Daily, Kill Screen, NPR, Business Insider, and the International Business Times. She also works on projects with the social philanthropy division at Liquidnet Holdings, Inc., an electronic marketplace that specializes in equity securities trading.

Our panel will also include two Brandeis seniors, Sara Robinson and Bryan Flatt.  Sara, a double IGS and business major, is finishing a senior thesis on the global proliferation of Harry Potter – a project that contributes to her work as an analyst at Sandbox industries, a startup incubator in San Francisco.  Last year, at the height of Britain’s phone-hacking scandal, Bryan was helping a media law firm in London prosecute tabloid journalists.  He will talk about how experiences abroad and a double major in history and IGS are helping him pursue a career in media and entertainment.

Come join the Conversation and share ideas!  You can leverage your experiences in and out of the classroom to launch interesting, meaningful careers.

Comments

  1. Karrah Beck says:

    I really enjoyed this presentation because it really helped me organize a path for my future. Because of the IGS major’s interdisciplinary nature, I wasn’t sure how I was going to create a career out of that (plus I wasn’t sure how one could create their own career and still get a good job), well, I was pleasantly surprised by this presentation. Not only was the advice extremely helpful to the students, but speakers answered questions thoughtfully, taking into consideration the uneasiness of students as they approached the work world. Myths and assumptions about the job sphere were cleared up (I had no idea one could quit jobs multiple times and still be successful) and that a person does not have to major in a specific career as an undergrad to get a job. Since I am still a freshman, this presentation really helped to solidify my declaring major plans-since I have multiple interests when it comes to a career (I can’t see myself just fulfilling a career with “structured” goals and objectives-I want to be in a creative environment, as Michelle Young said she wanted that for herself) so I am deciding to be an IGS major and creating my own path. I want to have the qualifications to work in many areas when I graduate, and I am excited for (hopefully) future opportunities.

  2. Cecilie Gromada says:

    Even as a freshman and still having some time to decide on a career and find a job within it, I found this IGS conversation very interesting and thought provoking. This presentation made me see the benefits of an IGS major; how it may be applied to many different interests and career paths. I have struggled to come up with plausible career options based on my varying interests, and this conversation made me realize that they may be combined in various ways into a single career. I was amazed of the great success of Michelle Young, something she achieved simply by studying and subsequently pursuing only what she was interested in, not just what seemed to be more practical and useful at the moment. Michelle Young stressed the flexibility and adaptability that a liberal arts education allows you to have, and gave several useful tips I am most definitely going to employ once in the job market.

  3. Wonhee Choi says:

    After attending this presentation, I left knowing that one’s future job is not limited by his/her education in college – there are options beyond one’s major to find a job. Listening to Michelle Young speak about her experiences and job careers following her college life demonstrated to me that there can be a lot of flexibility in finding a job – especially with a liberal arts degree/major. The varying types of jobs that Michelle worked at, whether it be working at a brand-name clothing company to working at Untapped Cities are simply fascinating and so diverse. At first, I was skeptical as to the range of job options that I would have while having a politics and/or IGS major in mind, but my worries were put at ease are after listening to Michelle speak. In addition to her job experience, the tips that she gave us, such as not being afraid to quit first or using social media to make connections with employers, are definitely things that I found the most useful and aspects of her lecture that I was most interested in as I am someone who has not had previous work experience (minus working for my parents). Ultimately, I am quite satisfied with attending Michelle Young’s lecture as the information that I learned will prove to be invaluable to me as I continue on with my life both during and after college.

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