Clocks, fruit flies, and Sweden

We mentioned previously that Rosbash, Hall and Young are getting the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine this year “for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm”.

The Physiology/Medicine lectures were on Thursday Dec 7 at 1 pm CET (7 am Brandeis time) and are still available to view. The Biology Department enjoyed watching the lectures on “tape delay”:

From and about the winners, via Cell:

About the science and its implications:

If you need to flesh out your fantasy of going to Sweden to collect your prize, see What to expect when you’re expecting a Nobel Prize

Video:

Circadian Rhythms and When to Eat (Swedish Television)

 

Olga Papaemmanouil Promoted to Associate Professor

During the November Board of Trustees meeting, Olga Papaemmanouil (Computer Science) was promoted to associate professor with tenure. She joined Brandeis in 2009 after receiving her Ph.D. in Computer Science from Brown University. Her work revolves around data management systems and distributed systems.

Her research aims to  offer insight on the complexity of the data sets and operations involved in data management systems and use this insight to produce solutions and optimizations that improve these systems’ effectiveness and efficiency. Her research is motivated by practical applications and offers real-world tools and services that assist application developers in tacking the challenges of building, managing and optimizing data-driven applications.

Her work covers a broad range of data-driven challenges, including big data exploration and analytics, workload and resource management for cloud databases, query optimization and query performance prediction.

Olga won an NSF Career Award for her work on performance tuning of cloud databases and her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Hewlett Packard, Amazon, Google and Huawei Technologies.

Neuroscience Faculty Members Named AAAS Fellows

Leslie Griffith & Gina Turrigiano-2017 AAAS Fellows

Leslie Griffith (left) and Gina Turrigiano (right)

Leslie Griffith and Gina Turrigiano have been named American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellows for 2017. This is in recognition of their contributions and scientific leadership in the field of Neuroscience.

Leslie Griffith, Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Volen Center for Complex Systems, studies sleep and memory using Drosophila melanogaster.

Gina Turrigiano is the Joseph Levitan Professor of Vision Science. Her lab studies the mechanisms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity and their effects in developing and functioning cortex.

Vice Provost for Research Edward Hackett is also a 2017 AAAS Fellow in the Section on History and Philosophy in Science.

Griffith, Turrigiano, Hackett and the other Fellows for 2017 will be recognized on Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018 at the 2018 AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas.

Read more at BrandeisNow.

Waltham Teachers Meet with Brandeis Scientists

Brandeis scientists & Waltham teachers

On Tuesday, November 7th, 32 science teachers from Waltham Public Middle and High Schools visited the Brandeis science labs as part of the Third Annual Brandeis Scientists in the Classroom Workshop. The workshop is designed to be an opportunity to connect middle and high school science teachers with Brandeis scientists. The teachers were grouped and matched with 14 Brandeis graduate students, postdocs and faculty who shared their Brandeis science research directly with the teachers to help them understand what we do, so they can better integrate science into their classroom lessons.

This event was an extension of an ongoing partnership between Brandeis and Waltham High School and was sponsored by the Brandeis MRSEC. The Waltham school district has a high percentage of students from backgrounds underrepresented in the sciences. Brandeis offers several on-going programs with Waltham teachers and students in an effort to broaden their participation in STEM.

Eisenbud Lectures in Mathematics and Physics set for November 27-29, 2017

The Departments of Physics and Mathematics at Brandeis University are incredibly excited to announce that this year’s Eisenbud Lectures in Mathematics and Physics will be given Prof. James P. Sethna, a theoretical physicist whose work has often carved out new directions in condensed matter physics, in its broadest interpretation.

The Eisenbud Lectures are the result of a bequest by Leonard and Ruth-Jean Eisenbud, and this year marks the 100th anniversary of Leonard Eisenbud’s birth. Leonard Eisenbud was a mathematical physicist at SUNY-Stony Brook; upon his retirement he moved to the Boston area, as his son David was a member of the Mathematics faculty at Brandeis, and was given a desk here. The bequest is for an annual lecture series by physicists and mathematicians working on the boundary between the first two fields.

Prof. Sethna has tackled traditional and highly non-traditional topics in Physics. The title of one of his recent talks is “The Statistical Mechanics of Zombies”!. “Mosh Pit Dynamics at Heavy Metal Concerts” is another example where Jim uses the tools of statistical mechanics to understand a social phenomenon. Jim is a fascinating speaker, and these lectures promise to be enlightening and entertaining in equal measure. His playful enthusiasm for science is certain to draw you in. So, try not to miss this year’s series of three Eisenbud Lectures.

The first lecture on Monday, November 27 will be on “Sloppy models, Differential geometry, and How Science Works”, and is intended for a general science audience. This lecture will be held in Gerstenzang 121 at 4 PM. The second lecture on Tuesday, November 28 will be a colloquium-style lecture entitled “Crackling Noise” and will take place in Abelson 131 at 4 PM. The final lecture, “Normal form for renormalization groups: The framework for the logs” will be delivered at 10 AM on Wednesday, November 29 in Abelson 333.

Refreshments will be served 15 minutes prior to each talk. There will be a reception in Abelson 333 following Tuesday’s talk.

Additional information is available on the lecture’s website.

We hope to see you all at what promises to be an exciting series of talks!

John Lisman (1944-2017)

Chair of Biology Piali Sengupta wrote:

It is with great sadness that I am writing to let you know that John Lisman passed away last night. He passed away peacefully surrounded by his family. John was an influential and creative scientist and a very good friend to all of us in Biology and Neuroscience. We are glad that we had the opportunity to honor him and hear from him at the Volen Retreat last week. He will be much missed.

John’s talk at the Volen Retreat earlier this month, delivered by video conference, is available here: The critical role of CaMKII in memory storage: 6 key physiological and behavioral tests

The family has asked that in lieu of flowers people consider contributing to the John Lisman Memorial Scholarship

Earlier tweets from past students and colleagues:

We also received this longer tribute from Michael Kahana:

I was greatly saddened to hear the news that John Lisman passed away this weekend. I spoke with him just a few weeks ago and was greatly looking forward to his upcoming visit to Penn. Although he told me of his illness, I was hoping to have a little more time with my good colleague and friend. Upon learning of his passing, I wanted to write down a few memories to share with friends and colleagues who knew John well.

I vividly recall when I first met John, at an evening gathering at his home that I attended just prior to joining the faculty at Brandeis (this may have been a precursor to the famous Boston Hippocampus meetings that John helped organize). The meeting was teaming with energy, and John welcomed me warmly, introducing me to other scientists in the room. John had recently become very interested in human memory, and as a newly minted PhD working on memory, John took me under his wings, teaching me about neurophysiology and quizzing me enthusiastically about the psychology of memory, a field that John was keen to master as quickly as possible.

John was a polymath, bursting with creative energy, and capable of seeing connections between diverse fields. Over the subsequent decade at Brandeis, John had an enormous influence on my career and research direction, introducing me to theta and gamma rhythms, and teaching me about countless topics in neurophysiology. On a typical day in the Volen Center, John would rush into my lab eager to share a new discovery or ask me a question about a study of memory that he had just learned about. He had this incredibly-infectious scientific curiosity, and he was always abundantly generous with his time, both with me and my students.

I particularly remember the early days when John was developing the LIJ (Lisman-Idiart-Jensen) model, and trying to learn as much as he could about the Sternberg task and other related phenomena in the field of human memory. Although I frequently challenged John on this front, he kept at it, continuing to refine the model together with Ole Jensen until they were able to answer many of the most serious objections. I just saw that the original paper was cited more than 1,200 times, and several of the follow up papers are well into the many hundreds of citations. This is arguably the most creative neurophysiological model of a cognitive function, and the best example of an attempt to link detailed physiological measurements to behavioral measures of human memory.

We have all lost a great friend, colleague, and mentor, and the field of neuroscience has lost one of its shining stars. I want to share my deepest sympathies with all of you who knew and loved John.

May his family be comforted among the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem.
Mike Kahana

Thomas Reese shared his thoughts:

John, your intellect and spirit lighted more than 30 summers my life at the MBL in Woods Hole.  You were a reference point for neurobiology there, holding court at your favorite table at the Kidd, at the far end of the dock.  A cherished invitation to lunch at exactly 12:00, with interesting synapse people passing though, or to hear a deluge of you new ideas about how a synapse is, or should be, put together.  Occasionally an invitation to dinner outside, behind your house with talk of many things…..joined by the delightful Natashia and other interesting people….discussing well into the night.

If Woods Hole is a little scientific Athens, you were our Socrates, lurking on Milfield. questioning in your disarming, open open way…bringing out the truth.  You were our Dogenes. searching Gardner Road for a man with the honest truth.

John, ,…John..it will seem empty there without you…you
will be very much missed..Tom Reese.     NIH

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