Dynamics of GreB-RNA polymerase interaction

Larry Tetone, Larry Friedman, and Melissa Osborne, and collaborators from the Gelles lab (Brandeis University) and the Landick lab (University of Wisconsin-Madison) used multi-wavelength single-molecule fluorescence methods to for the first time directly observe the dynamic binding and dissociation of an accessory protein with an RNAP during active transcript elongation.

Their findings are detailed in the recent paper “Dynamics of GreB-RNA polymerase interaction.” (PNAS, published online 1/30/2017).

Read more at The Little Engine Shop blog

Mediating the early response to acute hypoxia

Neurons in the brain require a continuous supply of oxygen for normal activity. If the level of oxygen in the brain decreases—for example when a blood vessel becomes blocked—neurons begin to die, and permanent brain damage can result. A shortage of oxygen first causes sodium ion channels within the surface membrane of the neurons to open. Sodium ions then flow into the cells through these open channels to trigger a cascade of events inside the cells that ultimately results in their death.

In “SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels mediates the early response to acute hypoxia in central neurons” (Elife), Plant et al. now reveal how oxygen deficiency, otherwise known as hypoxia, rapidly increases the flow of sodium ions into brain cells. By inducing hypoxia in neurons from rat brain, Plant et al. show that a lack of oxygen causes SUMOylation, a process whereby a series of enzymes work together to attach a Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (or SUMO) protein, of specific sodium ion channels in under a minute. The channels linked to the SUMO protein, a subtype called Nav1.2, open more readily than unmodified channels, allowing more sodium ions to enter the neurons.

Plant et al. study granule cells of the cerebellum, the most numerous type of neuron in the human brain. Further investigation is required to determine if SUMOylation of Nav1.2 channels underlies the response of other neurons to hypoxia as well. It also remains to be discovered whether molecules that block the SUMOylation of Nav1.2 channels, or that prevent the flow of sodium ions through these channels, could reduce the number of brain cells that die in low-oxygen conditions such as stroke.

doi: 10.7554/eLife.20054.
SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels mediates the early response to acute hypoxia in central neurons
Leigh D Plant, Jeremy D Marks, Steve AN Goldstein
eLife 2016;5:e20054

The 7th Annual SPROUT Awards Are Available

Post written by Fern Shamis.

The 7th Annual SPROUT Awards are back and want to help you bring your research and entrepreneurial ambitions to life! Have a great idea? Does your research have the ability to impact the world? Need funding support to make your innovation a reality? Consider applying for a SPROUT award.

In the past, successful SPROUT applications have come from all departments in the sciences including Biology, Biochemistry, Physics, and Chemistry.  Past candidates have proposed projects ranging from early-stage research and development to patent-ready projects.  Many undergraduates, graduates, staff and faculty have all pitched various projects from a Therapy for the Diseases of Aging (Anne Lawson, Hedstrom lab), to a Circadian Rhythm Incubating Device (Jae Jung, Rosbash lab) and the use of carrot fiber as an antidiabetic (Michelle Landstrom, Hayes lab) to a panel of outside judges in the hopes of receiving funding.   Articles about past SPROUT winners are available on Brandeis Now.  A list of additional winners and their executive summaries are also available online.

This year, the award pool once again is up to $100,000 to be dispersed among this year’s successful candidates.  The final deadline for preliminary applications is February 20th by 11 p.m.  Information sessions will be held on Thursday, February 2nd, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. in Volen 201 and on Tuesday, February 7th, 3:00.-4:00 p.m. Shapiro Science Center, 1st Floor Library.  More information and to submit our preliminary application is available on the SPROUT website!

Research Funding For Undergrads: MRSEC Summer Materials Undergraduate Research Fellowships

The Division of Science wishes to announce that, in 2017, we will offer seven MRSEC Summer  Materials Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SMURF) for Brandeis students doing undergraduate research, sponsored by the Brandeis Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

The fellowship winners will receive $5,000 stipends (housing support is not included) to engage in an intensive and rewarding research and development program that consists of full-time research in a MRSEC lab, weekly activities (~1-2 hours/week) organized by the MRSEC Director of Education, and participation in SciFest VII on Aug 3, 2017.

The due date for applications is February 27, 2017, at 6:00 PM EST.

To apply, the application form is online and part of the Unified Application: https://goo.gl/9LcSpG (Brandeis login required).


Eligibility

Students are eligible if they will be rising Brandeis sophomores, juniors, or seniors in Summer 2017 (classes of ’18, ’19, and ’20). No prior lab experience is required. A commitment from a Brandeis MRSEC member to serve as your mentor in Summer 2017 is required though. The MRSEC faculty list is: http://www.brandeis.edu/mrsec/people/index.html

Conflicting Commitments
SMURF recipients are expected to be available to do full time laboratory research between May 30 – August 4, 2017. During that period, SMURF students are not allowed to take summer courses, work another job or participate in extensive volunteer/shadowing experiences in which they commit to being out of the lab for a significant amount of time during the summer. Additionally, students should not be paid for doing lab research during this period from other funding sources.

Application Resources
Interested students should apply online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQ may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at brandeis.edu>.

Full year funding for undergraduates working in computational neuroscience

The Division of Science is pleased to announce the availability of Traineeships for Undergraduates in Computational Neuroscience through a recently-renewed grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Traineeships will commence in summer 2017 and run through the academic year 2017-18.

Please apply to the program by February 27, 2017 at 6 pm to be considered.

Traineeships in Computational Neuroscience are intended to provide intensive undergraduate training in computational neuroscience for students interested in eventually pursuing graduate research. The traineeships will provide approximately $5000 in stipend to support research in the summer, and $3000 each for fall and spring semesters during the academic year. Current Brandeis sophomores and juniors (classes of ’18, ’19) may apply. To be eligible to compete for this program, you must

  • have a GPA > 3.0 in Div. of Science courses
  • have a commitment from a professor to advise you on a research project related to computational neuroscience
  • have a course work plan to complete requirements for a major in the Division of Science
  • intend to apply to grad school in a related field.

Interested students should apply online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQ may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at brandeis.edu> or to Prof. Paul Miller.

Research Funding For Undergrads: Division of Science Fellowships

The Division of Science announces the opening of the Division of Science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship competition for Brandeis students doing undergraduate research in Summer 2017.  These fellowships are funded by generous alumni donations.

New this year are the Helaine B. Allen Summer Fellowships. These fellowships are for students working with Brandeis faculty members focusing in the sciences, specifically in the fields of Biochemistry, Biology, Biophysics, Chemistry, Neuroscience, and/or Physics.  There are five $5,000 awards available, each with $1,000 additional funding for laboratory supplies/support. See the Div Sci website for details of additional programs.

The due date for applications  is February 27, 2017,  at 6:00 PM EST.

Students who will be rising Brandeis sophomores, juniors, or seniors in Summer 2016 (classes of ’18, ’19, and ’20), who in addition are working in a lab in the Division of Science at the time of application, are eligible to apply. A commitment from a Brandeis faculty member to serve as your mentor in Summer 2017 is required.

The Division of Science Summer Program will run from May 30 – Aug 4, 2017. Recipients are expected to be available to do full time laboratory research during that period, and must commit to presenting a poster at the final poster session (SciFest VII) on Aug 3, 2017.

Interested students should apply online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQ may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at brandeis.edu>.

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