Rosenstiel Award lectures on Mar 22 to honor Susan Lindquist

James Haber, Director of the Rosenstiel Center, writes:

The 46th annual Rosenstiel Award for Distinguished Work in Basic Medical Research was awarded last October to Susan Lindquist (MIT), one of the most inventive and influential life scientists of our generation.  Sue tragically passed away a few weeks thereafter; in her honor we have arranged a symposium to celebrate her lab’s great legacy.  The Award talks will be held in next Wednesday, March 22, in Gerstenzang 123 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM, followed by a reception open to all in the Shapiro Science Center atrium.  We hope you will all come to honor Sue Lindquist and to be edified by the excellent work carried out by her former colleagues.

Angelika Amon  (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
“The Remarkable Scientific Life of Susan Lindquist”

Leah Cowen (University of Toronto)
“Harnessing Evolution to Thwart Microbial Drug Resistance and Treat Infectious Disease”

Daniel Jarosz (Stanford University)
“Remembering the Past: A New Form of Protein-Based Inheritance”

Sandro Santagata (Brigham and Women’s Hospital)
“Heat Shock Factor (HSF1): A Powerful Driver of Malignancy”

Susan Lindquist

 

8th Annual Pepose Award Lecture moved to Monday, March 13

Professor Frank Werblin, Professor Emeritus of Neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley will receive the eighth annual Jay Pepose ’75 Award in Vision Sciences from Brandeis University on Monday, March 13 (date change due to impending snowstorm). The event will be held at 4 PM (room to be announced). At that time, Werblin will deliver a public lecture titled, “The Evolution of Retinal Science over the Last 50 Years.”

During his research, Professor Werblin identified a number of cellular correlates underlying visual information processing in the retina. He has authored many articles in peer-reviewed journals, and has contributed articles on retinal circuitry to the Handbook of Brain Microcircuits (Oxford University Press) and retinal processing in the Encyclopedia of the Eye (Elsevier). Werblin founded Visionize in 2013, a company dedicated to helping patients suffering from vision diseases that cannot be corrected with glasses or surgery.

The Pepose Award is funded by a $1 million endowment established in 2009 through a gift from Jay Pepose ’75, MA’75, P’08, P’17, and Susan K. Feigenbaum ’74, P’08, P’17, his wife. Pepose is the founder and medical director of the Pepose Vision Institute in St. Louis and a professor of clinical ophthalmology at Washington University. He founded and serves as board president of the Lifelong Vision Foundation, whose mission is to preserve lifelong vision for people in the St. Louis community, nationally and internationally through research, community programs and education programs. While a student at Brandeis, he worked closely with John Lisman, the Zalman Abraham Kekst Chair in Neuroscience and professor of biology at Brandeis.

Leslie Griffith Receives SASTRA-Obaid Siddiqi Award

SASTRA award


Model depicts how the integration of light, ambient temperature, the circadian clock and homeostatic sleep drive sets the balance between daytime and nighttime sleep [Parisky, K.M., Agosto Rivera, J.L., Donelson, N.C., Kotecha, S. and Griffith, L.C. (2016) “Reorganization of sleep by temperature in Drosophila requires light, the homeostat and the circadian clock” Curr Biol 26:882-892]

Leslie C. Griffith, Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Volen National Center for Complex Systems, has received the SASTRA–Obaid Siddiqi Award for excellence in life sciences. The prize is given by the Shanmugha Arts, Science, Technology & Research Academy (SASTRA) University in Thanjavur, India. Siddiqi was a pioneering molecular biologist and founder of the Molecular Biology Unit of the Tata Institute for Fundamental Research.

Griffith’s interests range from the biochemistry of neuronal signal transduction, in particular the role of CaMKII in memory formation, to the hierarchical relationships between complex behaviors such as sleep and learning. She has contributed to our understanding of these issues using genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster and believes that model systems have an important place in pioneering the understanding of basic biological processes. Her lab has been active in developing tools that allow interrogation of molecular and cellular processes with temporal and spatial resolution in freely behaving animals to bridge the molecule-behavior gap.

Griffith received the award on February 28, 2017.

The 7th Annual SPROUT Awards Are Available

Post written by Fern Shamis.

The 7th Annual SPROUT Awards are back and want to help you bring your research and entrepreneurial ambitions to life! Have a great idea? Does your research have the ability to impact the world? Need funding support to make your innovation a reality? Consider applying for a SPROUT award.

In the past, successful SPROUT applications have come from all departments in the sciences including Biology, Biochemistry, Physics, and Chemistry.  Past candidates have proposed projects ranging from early-stage research and development to patent-ready projects.  Many undergraduates, graduates, staff and faculty have all pitched various projects from a Therapy for the Diseases of Aging (Anne Lawson, Hedstrom lab), to a Circadian Rhythm Incubating Device (Jae Jung, Rosbash lab) and the use of carrot fiber as an antidiabetic (Michelle Landstrom, Hayes lab) to a panel of outside judges in the hopes of receiving funding.   Articles about past SPROUT winners are available on Brandeis Now.  A list of additional winners and their executive summaries are also available online.

This year, the award pool once again is up to $100,000 to be dispersed among this year’s successful candidates.  The final deadline for preliminary applications is February 20th by 11 p.m.  Information sessions will be held on Thursday, February 2nd, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. in Volen 201 and on Tuesday, February 7th, 3:00.-4:00 p.m. Shapiro Science Center, 1st Floor Library.  More information and to submit our preliminary application is available on the SPROUT website!

Research Funding For Undergrads: MRSEC Summer Materials Undergraduate Research Fellowships

The Division of Science wishes to announce that, in 2017, we will offer seven MRSEC Summer  Materials Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SMURF) for Brandeis students doing undergraduate research, sponsored by the Brandeis Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

The fellowship winners will receive $5,000 stipends (housing support is not included) to engage in an intensive and rewarding research and development program that consists of full-time research in a MRSEC lab, weekly activities (~1-2 hours/week) organized by the MRSEC Director of Education, and participation in SciFest VII on Aug 3, 2017.

The due date for applications is February 27, 2017, at 6:00 PM EST.

To apply, the application form is online and part of the Unified Application: https://goo.gl/9LcSpG (Brandeis login required).


Eligibility

Students are eligible if they will be rising Brandeis sophomores, juniors, or seniors in Summer 2017 (classes of ’18, ’19, and ’20). No prior lab experience is required. A commitment from a Brandeis MRSEC member to serve as your mentor in Summer 2017 is required though. The MRSEC faculty list is: http://www.brandeis.edu/mrsec/people/index.html

Conflicting Commitments
SMURF recipients are expected to be available to do full time laboratory research between May 30 – August 4, 2017. During that period, SMURF students are not allowed to take summer courses, work another job or participate in extensive volunteer/shadowing experiences in which they commit to being out of the lab for a significant amount of time during the summer. Additionally, students should not be paid for doing lab research during this period from other funding sources.

Application Resources
Interested students should apply online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQ may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at brandeis.edu>.

Irving Epstein has been named AAAS Fellow

irving-epstein

In recognition of his contribution to the study of oscillating chemical reactions, Irving Epstein, the Henry F. Fischbach Professor of Chemistry, has been selected as a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Epstein, who in his 45 years at Brandeis has served as Provost and Dean of the Arts and Sciences, said he was honored to receive the award from the AAAS. “I’m delighted and grateful for the recognition,” he said. “It’s always nice to be appreciated by fellow scientists.”

 

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