Two Science Students Are Fulbright Fellows

Two of the five Brandeis undergraduates and recent alumni that have been selected to teach English overseas as Fulbright Fellows are Division of Science students.

Abby Brooks ’16 and Joel Burt-Miller ’16 have received English Teaching Assistantships through the Fulbright grant program. Brooks is a double major in biology and history. She will be teaching in Laos. Joel Burt-Miller ’16 is a double major in biology and Health: Science, Society and Policy. He will be teaching in India.

Find more information about our soon-to-be graduates and the Fulbright program on BrandeisNow.

7th Annual Jay Pepose Award to be presented April 12 at 12:30 pm

David WilliamsDavid Williams from the University of Rochester has been selected to receive the 7th annual Jay Pepose ’75 Award in Vision Sciences. Williams will be presented with the Pepose award on Tuesday, April 12th at 12:30 pm in Gerstenzang 121. The celebration will include David Williams talk titled, “Seeing Through the Retina”.

Williams’ research has improved the effectiveness of laser refractive surgery, the design of contact lenses, and enabled the imaging of single cells in the retina.

Yoshinori Ohsumi to Receive Rosenstiel Award Wednesday, April 6

ohsumi220Biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi will receive the 45th Rosenstiel Award for Distinguished Work in Biomedical Science this Wednesday, April 6th at 4:00 pm in Gerstenzang 123. At that time, he will present a lecture titled, “Lessons from yeast: Cellular recycling system, autophagy”.

Ohsumi is a cell biologist and professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology’s Frontier Research Center in Japan. He is one of leading experts in the world on autophagy, a process that allows for the degradation and recycling of cellular components. The Rosenstiel Award is being given to Ohsumi in recognition of his pioneering discoveries in autophagy.

Learn more about Professor Ohsumi and his research at BrandeisNow.

Four Brandeis Science Grads Receive 2016 NSF Graduate Fellowships

GRFP_logoA science education at Brandeis University can be a springboard to future science achievements. We would like to congratulate four of our science graduates who have received the prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships for 2016.

Noam Saper

Noam was an outstanding student graduating summa cum laude with highest honors in Chemistry in 2015. At Brandeis, Noam worked in the labs of Prof. Barry Snider and Prof. Christine Thomas. He co-authored 3 publications with Snider and Thomas.

Noam received multiple awards including the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship (2014); the Elihu A. Silver Prize (2014); and the Doris Brewer Cohen Endowment Award (2015).

Following graduation and enthralled by the mysteries of the west coast, he decided to attend the University of California, Berkeley. Noam is working on mechanistic studies of Ni-catalyzed diaryl ether hydrogenolysis in Professor John Hartwig’s laboratory.

Alexandra Sun

Another outstanding Chemistry student, Alexandra Sun graduated magna cum laude with highest honors in 2015. Alexandra also worked in Christine Thomas’ lab where she carried out research on Transition Metal Complexes Featuring a Redox-Active Bidentate Amido-Phosphido Ligand. Alexandra received the Melvin M. Snider Prize in Chemistry in 2015.

She is currently a first-year student in the Chemistry Department at the University of Michigan working with Professor Corey Stephenson on developing new methods in photoredox catalysis.

Abigail Zadina

Abigail received her BS/MS in Neuroscience in 2013. Working in Michael Rosbash’s lab, she was a co-author on 2 publications and received numerous awards including the Doris Brewer Cohen award and the Elihu Silver Prize. In 2013, Abigail discussed her science experience in the Brandeis publication Imprint.

Following graduation, Abigail worked at Columbia in Richard Axel’s lab. She is currently a PhD student in Neurobiology and Behavior at Columbia University.

Joseph Jacobowitz

Joseph Jacobowitz received his BS/MS in 2014, graduating summa cum laude with Highest Honors in Biochemistry. While a Brandeis undergraduate, Joseph co-authored a publication with his faculty mentor, Doug Theobald. In 2013, Joseph received the Division of Science Prize for Outstanding Research Accomplishment and the William P. Jencks  Award in Biochemistry in 2014.

Joseph is in the Biology PhD program at MIT, working for Jing-Ke Weng on the origins of chemodiversity in plants.

Summer Research at Brandeis

All four science graduates had the opportunity to jump start their careers by doing summer research at Brandeis. Noam, Alexandra and Joseph were Division of Science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURF). Abigail received a Computational Neuroscience Traineeship.

These undergraduate research programs enable students to spend their summers at Brandeis engaged in intensive undergraduate training and summer research. Both programs provide a stipend, faculty mentoring and full-time lab research. The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellows work culminates in a poster presentation summarizing their work. The SURF program is funded by generous donations from alumni. The Computational Neuroscience Traineeship program begins in the summer and runs through the following academic year. It is funded through a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. 

Research Funding For Undergrads: Div Sci SURF

The Division of Science announces the opening of the Division of Science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship competition for Brandeis students doing undergraduate research in Summer 2016.  These fellowships are funded by generous alumni donations.

The due date for applications  is February 24, 2016,  at 6:00 PM EST.

Division of Science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellows will receive $5000 in stipend support to do summer research (housing support is not included). Students who will be rising Brandeis sophomores, juniors, or seniors in Summer 2016 (classes of ’17, ’18, and ’19), who in addition are working in a lab in the Division of Science at the time of application, are eligible to apply. A commitment from a Brandeis faculty member to serve as your mentor in Summer 2016 is required.

The Division of Science Summer Program will run from May 31 – Aug 5, 2016. Recipients are expected to be available to do full time laboratory research during that period, and must commit to presenting a poster at the final poster session (SciFest VI) on Aug 4, 2016.

The application form is online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQ may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at brandeis.edu>.

There will be a question-and-answer session about summer research funding applications on Thursday, Jan 14 at 5 pm in Gerstenzang 123

Research Funding for Undergrads: M. R. Bauer Fellows

The Division of Science is pleased to announce that a generous gift from the M. R. Bauer Foundation will fund ten M. R. Bauer Foundation Summer Undergraduate Research Fellows (“M. R. Bauer Fellows”) in Summer 2016. The due date for applications  is February 24, 2016 at 6:00 PM EST. 

M. R. Bauer Fellows will receive $5000 as a stipend in support of their summer research (housing support is not included). Students who will be rising Brandeis sophomores, juniors, or seniors in Summer 2016 (classes of ’17, ’18, and ’19), are eligible to apply. A commitment from a Brandeis Division of Science faculty member to serve as mentor in Summer 2016 on a project leading to a senior thesis is required.

The Division of Science Summer Program will run from May 31 to Aug 5, 2016. M. R. Bauer Fellows are expected to be available to do full time laboratory research during that period, and must commit to presenting a poster at the final poster session (SciFest VI) on August 4, 2016. M.R. Bauer Fellows are also expected to give back to the University in ways that promote science and research.

The application form is online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQ may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at brandeis.edu>.

IMG_1293The M.R. Bauer Foundation has been a generous and steadfast friend of the Volen National Center for Complex Systems for over 20 years. Established at Brandeis University in 1994, the Volen Center brings together faculty, students and postdocs from across the sciences with a common goal of understanding the brain, from the level of molecules to cognition.

The foundation recognizes that the advancement of science takes place not only in the lab, but in the seminar room and lecture hall, and in the countless conversations that help to spread ideas and spark new research. The size and intimate setting of the Volen Center has made it an ideal environment for forging connections among investigators from diverse fields.  A central part of these connections is the M.R. Bauer Foundation Colloquium Series, Distinguished Lecturer Series, and Annual Scientific Retreat program. This support has now been substantially widened through this new program of supporting undergraduates in summer research, which will enable greater participation by the youngest group of Brandeis researchers.

There will be a question-and-answer session about summer research funding applications on Thursday, Jan 14 at 5 pm in Gerstenzang 123

 

Research Funding for Undergrads: Computational Neuroscience Traineeships for 2016-17

The Division of Science is pleased to announce the availability of Traineeships for Undergraduates in Computational Neuroscience through a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Traineeships will commence in summer 2016 and run through the academic year 2016-17.

Please apply to the program by February 24, 2016 at 6 pm to be considered.

Traineeships in Computational Neuroscience are intended to provide intensive undergraduate training in computational neuroscience for students interested in eventually pursuing graduate research. The traineeships will provide a $5000 stipend to support research in the summer, and $3000 each for fall and spring semesters during the academic year. Current Brandeis sophomores and juniors are eligible to apply. In addition, to be eligible to compete for this program, you must

  • have a GPA > 3.0 in Div. of Science courses
  • have a commitment from a professor to advise you on a research project related to computational neuroscience
  • have a course work plan to complete requirements for a major in the Division of Science
  • intend to apply to grad school in a related field.compneuroimage

The curricular requirements are listed on the program website.  The application form is online (Brandeis login required). Also, see Frequently Asked Questions.

There will be a question-and-answer session about summer research funding applications on Thursday, Jan 14 at 5 pm in Gerstenzang 123

Sekuler elected to Society of Experimental Psychologists

Robert Sekuler photoLouis and Frances Salvage Professor of Psychology and Professor of Neuroscience Robert Sekuler has been elected a fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists.  The society, founded by Edward Titchener in 1904, elects 6 new members annually from among the leading experimentalists in North America. Sekuler and his lab continue to research issues involved with visual perception, visual and auditory memory, and the cognitive process, often using video games in the research process.

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