Hongfu Liu Joins Computer Science as Assistant Professor

Dr. Hongfu Liu has joined the Michtom School of Computer Science at Brandeis University as a tenure-track assistant professor. He received his Ph.D. in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Northeastern University (NEU), supervised by Prof. Yun (Raymond) Fu within 3.5 years. Before joining NEU, he earned his master and bachelor degrees in management from the Beihang University with Prof. Junjie Wu. He also received two minor bachelor degrees in applied mathematics and laws.

His current research interests lie in data mining, machine learning  and related applications on business intelligence, computer vision and bioinformatics. He has published several papers in top conferences and journals, such as KDD, ICDM, SDM, AAAI, IJCAI, T-PAMI, T-KDE, T-IP, DMKD, BMC and so on. He is also the reviewer for several top conferences and journals. He has been nominated as KDD Top 20 rising star all over the world in 2016.

Papaemmanouil Receives Funding from Huawei Technologies

Olga PapaemmanouilShenzhen-based Huawei Technologies, the largest manufacturer of telecom equipment in the world, is supporting Associate Professor of Computer Science Olga Papaemmanouil‘s efforts to develop machine learning approaches for managing the performance of data management systems. The grant will support research on workload management, that is the task of query placement, query scheduling and resource allocation for database applications. Workload management is an extremely critical task for database systems as it can impact the execution time of incoming processing tasks as well as the overall perceived performance of the database  and the quality of the service (QoS) offered to end-clients. The complexity of the problem increases for applications that involve dynamically changing workloads and concurrently executing queries sharing the same underlying resources, as well as applications that are deployed on data clusters with fluctuating resource availability.

Dr. Papaemmanouil’s research aims to design frameworks that can be trained on application-specific properties and performance metrics  to automatically learn how to effectively dispatch incoming queries across a cluster of servers, implicitly solving the resource allocation challenge. These techniques will rely on machine learning algorithms (reinforcement learning and deep learning)  that model the interaction of concurrently running queries  as well as the relationship between database performance and the underlying resource availability in the cluster. The project will lead the way towards the development of workload management solutions that eliminate ad-hoc heuristics often used by database administrators to address these challenges and replace them with software modules capable of providing custom workload management strategies to end-clients.

Olga Papaemmanouil Promoted to Associate Professor

During the November Board of Trustees meeting, Olga Papaemmanouil (Computer Science) was promoted to associate professor with tenure. She joined Brandeis in 2009 after receiving her Ph.D. in Computer Science from Brown University. Her work revolves around data management systems and distributed systems.

Her research aims to  offer insight on the complexity of the data sets and operations involved in data management systems and use this insight to produce solutions and optimizations that improve these systems’ effectiveness and efficiency. Her research is motivated by practical applications and offers real-world tools and services that assist application developers in tacking the challenges of building, managing and optimizing data-driven applications.

Her work covers a broad range of data-driven challenges, including big data exploration and analytics, workload and resource management for cloud databases, query optimization and query performance prediction.

Olga won an NSF Career Award for her work on performance tuning of cloud databases and her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Hewlett Packard, Amazon, Google and Huawei Technologies.

Searches for Tenure-Track Faculty in the Sciences, 2017

Brandeis has six open searches for tenure-track faculty in the Division of Science this fall, with the intent to strengthen cross-disciplinary studies across the sciences. We are looking forward to a busy season of intriguing seminars from candidates this winter.

  1. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. Biochemistry is looking for a creative scientist to establish an independent research program addressing fundamental questions of biological, biochemical, or biophysical mechanism, and who will maintain a strong interest in teaching Biochemistry.
  2. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Chemistry seeks a creative individual at the assistant professor level for a tenure-track faculty position in physical (especially theoretical/computational) chemistry, materials chemistry, or chemical biology.
  3. Assistant Professor of Computer Science. Computer Science invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track assistant professor, beginning Fall 2018, in the broad area of Machine Learning and Data Science, including but not limited to deep learning, statistical learning, large scale and cloud-based systems for data science, biologically inspired learning systems, and applications of analytics to real-world problems.
  4. Assistant Professor in Soft Matter or Biological Physics. Physics invites applications for the position of tenure-track Assistant Professor beginning in the fall of 2018 in the interdisciplinary areas of biophysics, soft condensed matter physics and biologically inspired material science.
  5. Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in Psychology. Psychology invites applications for a tenure track appointment at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor, with a specialization in Aging, to start August 2018. They seek an individual with an active human research program in any aspect of aging, including cognitive, social, clinical and health psychology.
  6. Tenure Track Assistant Professor in Applied MathematicsMathematics invites applications for a tenure-track position in applied mathematics at the rank of assistant professor beginning fall 2018. An ideal candidate will be expected to help to build an applied mathematics program within the department, and to interact with other science faculty at Brandeis. Candidates from all areas of applied mathematics will be considered.

Brandeis University is an equal opportunity employer, committed to building a culturally diverse intellectual community, and strongly encourages applications from women and minorities.  Diversity in its student body, staff and faculty is important to Brandeis’ primary mission of providing a quality education.  The search committees are therefore particularly interested in candidates who, through their creative endeavors, teaching and/or service experiences, will increase Brandeis’ reputation for academic excellence and better prepare its students for a pluralistic society.

Jordan Pollack Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Jordan Pollack

The International Society for Artificial Life. has awarded a lifetime achievement award to Jordan Pollack, Professor of Computer Science and Chairman of Computer Science department, for his work on robotics, computer-simulated evolution and artificial life forms. Pollack, who has been a Brandeis faculty member for the past 23 years, is also the director of the Dynamical & Evolutionary Machine Organization (DEMO). DEMO is a research lab where Pollack and his students study recurrent neural networks, evolutionary computation, and dynamical systems.

Pollack received the lifetime award last week (September 4-8) at The European Conference on Artificial Life 2017 in Lyon, France. Nick Moran and Jordan Pollack’s paper “Effects of Cooperative and Competitive Coevolution on Complexity in a Linguistic Prediction Game” (MITCogNet) also received the best paper award at the conference.

In an interview with Brandeis Now, Professor Pollack discusses his career and research.

Brandeis Receives Major Grant from the Mellon Foundation

Brandeis University has received a major grant to expand the LAPPS Grid Project that seamlessly connects open-source computer programs to quickly analyze huge amounts of language from diverse sources and genres.

James Pustejovsky

James Pustejovsky

Brandeis University has been awarded a two-year, $390,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to lead an international collaboration to link the two major American and European infrastructures for the computational analysis of natural language. The resulting meta-framework has the potential to transform scholarship and development across multiple disciplines in the sciences, language and social sciences, and digital humanities by enabling scholars in Europe, the US, and Asia to work seamlessly across a massive range of software tools and data resources, developed separately by the American and European efforts. Led by James Pustejovsky, the TJX/ Feldberg Professor of Computer Science at Brandeis, the project team includes Nancy Ide (Vassar College), Erhard Hinrichs (University of Tübingen), and Jan Hajic (Charles University Prague).

The Language Applications (LAPPS) Grid Project—a collaborative, NSF-funded effort among Vassar, Brandeis, Carnegie Mellon University, and the Linguistic Data Consortium at the University of Pennsylvania—and the European Common Language Resources and Technology Infrastructure (CLARIN) are both frameworks (“grids”) that create and provide access to a broad range of computational resources for analyzing vast bodies of natural language data: digital language data collections, digital tools to work with them, and expertise for researchers to use them. Within each framework, members adhere to common standards and protocols, so that tools and data from different projects are “interoperable”: users can access, combine, and chain data from different repositories and tools from different sources to perform complex operations on a single platform with a single sign-on.

But the LAPPS Grid and CLARIN are not themselves interoperable. Researchers using data and tools in one framework cannot easily access or add data and tools from the other. LAPPS Grid users cannot access CLARIN’s multi-lingual services for digital humanities, social sciences, and language technology research and development, like Prague’s tools for search of oral history archives (developed to support their hosting the USC Shoah Archive), or Tübingen’s WebLicht services for data mining political and social science documents. CLARIN users don’t have access to the LAPPS Grid’s state-of-the-art tools for English and, through the LAPPS Grid’s federation with five Asian grids, to services providing a broad spectrum of capabilities for work in Asian languages. Scholars manually annotating a text corpus with CLARIN’s WebAnno (developed at TU-Darmstadt) would love to feed their work through iterative machine learning and evaluation facilities in the LAPPS Grid—but can’t.

The new Mellon Foundation funding will enable the project team to make the two grids interoperable on three levels:

  • Infrastructural: While the LAPPS Grid and CLARIN are both committed to open data and software, they do provide secure access to licensed resources, including the vast majority of the language data available over the web. The team will create a “trust network” between the two services, enabling single-authentication sign-on;
  • Technical: The LAPPS Grid and CLARIN have different underlying architectures and data exchange formats. The team will map these architectures and formats onto one another, enabling communication between the two frameworks over the web;
  • Semantic: To combine differently curated datasets, the data needs not only to share or be converted into a common format, but must also share a vocabulary for describing basic linguistic structures (a common language ontology) that tells computers how to combine the data into meaningful statements. The project team will extend the common exchange vocabulary developed by the LAPPS Grid to the web services of both frameworks and implement a set of conversion services.

The project will dramatically extend the power and reach of both the European and American frameworks and put their combined resources at the direct disposal of scholars from a broad range of fields in the humanities and social sciences, without requiring them to be computer programmers. “It will effectively create an ‘internet of language applications’ for the everyday computer user,” explained Dr. Pustejovsky. “We’re going to give every scholar access to a toolkit that’s now only available to the largest corporations.”

 

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