Rosenstiel Award lectures on Mar 22 to honor Susan Lindquist

James Haber, Director of the Rosenstiel Center, writes:

The 46th annual Rosenstiel Award for Distinguished Work in Basic Medical Research was awarded last October to Susan Lindquist (MIT), one of the most inventive and influential life scientists of our generation.  Sue tragically passed away a few weeks thereafter; in her honor we have arranged a symposium to celebrate her lab’s great legacy.  The Award talks will be held in next Wednesday, March 22, in Gerstenzang 123 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM, followed by a reception open to all in the Shapiro Science Center atrium.  We hope you will all come to honor Sue Lindquist and to be edified by the excellent work carried out by her former colleagues.

Angelika Amon  (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
“The Remarkable Scientific Life of Susan Lindquist”

Leah Cowen (University of Toronto)
“Harnessing Evolution to Thwart Microbial Drug Resistance and Treat Infectious Disease”

Daniel Jarosz (Stanford University)
“Remembering the Past: A New Form of Protein-Based Inheritance”

Sandro Santagata (Brigham and Women’s Hospital)
“Heat Shock Factor (HSF1): A Powerful Driver of Malignancy”

Susan Lindquist

 

Division of Science Hosts the 2016 Undergraduate Science Symposium

Written by Jena Pitman-Leung.

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The Division of Science Graduate Affairs group hosted the 2nd annual Brandeis University Undergraduate Science Symposium on Saturday 17th, 2016. More than 60 students representing institutions from Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire attended the event, which was held in the Shapiro Science Center. The morning session included research talks from faculty in the Life Sciences (Don Katz, Liz Hedstrom) and the Physical Sciences (Matt Headrick, Christine Thomas), followed by panel discussions with faculty in the Life Sciences (Liz Hedstrom, Bruce Goode, and Maria Miara) and Physical Sciences (Gabriella Sciolla, Isaac Krauss, Jordan Pollack) on how to apply to graduate school. The students then came together for a networking lunch with Brandeis students, postdocs, and faculty. Lunch was followed by a well attended poster session, where 38 students had the opportunity to present their independent research. The day ended by awarding prizes for the best posters in five disciplines. The winners were:

Biology: Rahim Hirani, Hampshire College, “The regulatory role of Beta-Arrestin 1 in prostate cancer cell proliferation”
Neuroscience: Paige Miranda, Wellesley College, “Metabolic Processes Driving Hippocampal Long Term Potentiatio”
Biochemistry: Myfanwy Adams, Wellesley College, “Expression of a Cardiac ATP-sensitive Potassium Channel in a Heterologous Cell Line”
Chemistry: Natsuko Yamagata, Brandeis University, “Exploring the Unexplored: Supramolecular Hydrogels of Retro-Inverso Peptides for 3D Cell Culture”
Physics: Jameson O’Reilly, Northeastern University, “A capillary-mimicking optical tissue phantom for diffuse correlation spectroscopy”

The Division of Science is committed to supporting local undergraduate research, and is excited about the possibility of these bright young scientist choosing Brandeis for their graduate study. We look forward to hosting similar events in the future!

68th New England Complex Fluids Workshop, September 23, 2016

The 68th New England Complex Fluids Workshop will be held 9:00 am – 4:00 pm Friday, September 23, 2016 at the Shapiro Campus Center on Brandeis University. NECFW68 will feature two research talks, two soundbite sessions and one panel of scientists who are thriving after leaving academia for industry.

Online registration for the meeting is required, but thanks to the NSF Brandeis MRSEC, it is free. However, please register by 8 am, September 20 so we can order enough food for you.

NECFW‘s goal is to encourage collaboration among researchers from industry and academe in the New England area studying Soft Condensed Matter. We hold one day workshops four times a year which offer the opportunity for discussion and exchange of ideas between students, post-docs, and professionals. An additional objective is to further the career development of students and post-docs by introducing them to the local academic and industrial research community.

Please register at the complex fluids website: http://www.complexfluids.org. If you would like to present a 4:00 minute soundbite, submit your talk title and abstract when you register for the meeting. Soundbites are restricted to the first 25 submissions. Additional information such as maps, directions, schedule and a list of registered attendees is available at the website as well.

This year will feature an Industrial Panel to tell tales of life after academia. Entrepreneurs and industrial scientists will describe their pathway to creating companies, discuss which qualities they seek in applicants and answer the following questions. What kind of training and education do industrial labs seek in job applicants? What scientific and other knowledge should applicants possess? experience? skills? creativity? business knowledge? What should the universities do to better prepare students for a career in industry? What do the panel members wish they did differently in college to better prepare themselves for industry? What should students / postdocs be doing now to prepare for an industrial career? How can students find an internship? How should students build a network of contacts to help them find a job? How does research done in industry compare to that done in universities? What (if any) is the relevancy of research being done at universities to entrepreneurs, industrial scientists and managers?

Celebrating Chris Miller at Christravaganza Millerpalooza

Since its founding at Brandeis in 1976, Chris Miller’s lab has been home to 25 graduate students and 35 postdocs. Many of them, together with friends and colleagues from around the world, came together on July 8 and 9 for a two day symposium celebrating Chris’ 70th birthday.

For four decades Miller has used electrophysiological methods to study single ion channels. Ion channels are proteins that open and close, selectively allowing specific ions to cross cell membranes, for example to drive muscle contraction or nerve cell signaling. The selective transport of ions across membranes is a fundamental feature of cells.

Miller began studying channels selective for potassium ions, and then in 1978 discovered a chloride selective channel, from Torpedo, the first member of the important CLC chloride channels whose malfunction is implicated in a variety of diseases. (Its name comes from the electric ray Torpedo californica from which the channel was first isolated.) Chris discovered the unusual “double barreled” architecture of the CLC family of ion channels. The lab continues to work on related proteins, including Cl/H+ exchange-transporters.

Miller’s lab has followed clues in recent years to find additional novel channels to study, including bacterial proteins involved in acid resistance and most recently channels that are selective for fluoride. Chris has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator since 1989 and in 2007 he was elected to the US National Academy of Sciences.

Rod MacKinnon ’78 was Chris’ very first student while he was an undergraduate at Brandeis. After medical school, Rod came back to Chris’ lab as a postdoc, and together they investigated the mechanism of calcium activated potassium ion channels. Later, at Rockefeller University, Rod used high resolution x-ray diffraction to determine the complete molecular structure of the proteins that form the channel. For this he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2003. The structure confirmed a cartoon picture of how the potassium channel works that Chris, with postdoctoral fellows MacKinnon and Jaques Neyton, had developed ten years earlier.

Chris’ wife, Brandeis Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature Robin Feuer Miller, and their three daughters were in attendance. Lulu Miller (who is also co-host of the NPR program Invisibilia) introduced her father for the final talk of the symposium.

The editors thank Dan Oprian for help with this article. The photographs were taken by Heratch Ekmekjian.

7th Annual Jay Pepose Award to be presented April 12 at 12:30 pm

David WilliamsDavid Williams from the University of Rochester has been selected to receive the 7th annual Jay Pepose ’75 Award in Vision Sciences. Williams will be presented with the Pepose award on Tuesday, April 12th at 12:30 pm in Gerstenzang 121. The celebration will include David Williams talk titled, “Seeing Through the Retina”.

Williams’ research has improved the effectiveness of laser refractive surgery, the design of contact lenses, and enabled the imaging of single cells in the retina.

Brandeis University and NCBI to host Genomics Hackathon in April

Brandeis University is partnering with NCBI to host a Boston-area genomics hackathon April 25-27, 2016. Two previous hackathons held at NCBI successfully integrated scientists from across the country with different skill sets to tackle challenges in RNA-seq and genomics.

The August 2015 NCBI hackathon identified gaps in usability of current RNA-seq analysis tools and in just three days created software that greatly improved ease-of-use.

The August 2015 NCBI hackathon identified gaps in usability of current RNA-seq analysis tools and in just three days created software that greatly improved ease-of-use.

NCBI hackathons identify gaps in the current state-of-the-art analysis pipelines and outline feasible solutions to bring users, especially novices, closer to understanding genomic data and analysis. This hackathon will be highly cooperative: teams of 5-6 individuals will work on non-overlapping projects and share their expertise in a collaborative way. Projects planned for this session include:

  • Network Analysis of Variants
  • Structural Variation
  • RNA-Seq
  • Streaming Data and Metadata
  • Neuroscience/Immunity
  • Command-line user-interface design

The hackathon is an exciting opportunity to meet researchers in similar fields at different institutions, learn new ways of applying your work, and work with a team to contribute original work to the genomics field. Participants are also provided with the opportunity to publish their work in a newly-created F1000 hackathon channel.

Brandeis University and NCBI invite all genomics researchers to apply and visit the NCBI announcement for more information. Participants will need to bring their own laptops to the event and have some knowledge of a scripting language (Python, PERL, Shell, etc).

Please apply by 5:00 PM March 22, 2016.

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