Science Posse Scholars Present Posters July 9 at SSC Atrium

Student at Science Posse Session

On July 9th, incoming Science Posse Scholars will be presenting posters on various research topics including pheromones, computational models of galaxies, and software engineering.  The event will take place in the Shapiro Science Center atrium from 1:30 to 3:00 PM. The 10 scholars are interested in pursuing STEM degrees and will all start here at Brandeis in the fall.

Everyone is encouraged to attend.

HSSP undergraduate receives Critical Language Scholarship

CLS logoRegina Tham’20 has been awarded a Critical Language Scholarship. She is among the approximately 200 Brandeis students and recent alumni to receive fellowships and scholarships this year. A pre-health student majoring in Health: Science, Society, and Policy, Regina also works in the Leslie Griffith lab and is a Teaching Assistant for General Chemistry Lab.  Regina will be using her scholarship to study Mandarin Chinese in an intensive language program this summer.

 

 

 

Summer Research Funding For Undergrads in 2018

The Division of Science announces the opening of the Division of Science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship competition for Brandeis students doing undergraduate research in Summer 2018.  These fellowships are funded by generous alumni donations and by grants.

New this year is the Dan Getz Endowment for Cardiovascular Research Fellowship. This fellowship is for a student working with a Brandeis faculty member on a topic relevant to cardiovascular health. See the Div Sci website for details of additional programs which fund students across all the sciences. We expect to fund at least 30 students this summer.

The due date for applications  is March 1, 2018,  at 6:00 PM EST.

Students who will be rising Brandeis sophomores, juniors, or seniors in Summer 2018 (classes of ’19, ’20, and ’21), who in addition are working in a lab in the Division of Science at the time of application, are eligible to apply. A commitment from a Brandeis faculty member to serve as your mentor in Summer 2017 is required.

The Division of Science Summer Program will run from May 29 – Aug 3, 2018. Recipients are expected to be available to do full time laboratory research during that period, and must commit to presenting a poster at the final poster session (SciFest VIII) on Aug 2, 2018.

Interested students should apply online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQs may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at brandeis.edu>.

Grant funding for undergraduates doing Computational Neuroscience

The Division of Science is pleased once again to announce the availability of Traineeships for Undergraduates in Computational Neuroscience through a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Traineeships will commence in summer 2018 and run through the academic year 2018-19.

Please apply to the program by March 1, 2018 at 6 pm to be considered.

Computational Neuroscience undergraduate trainees were first authors on 2 papers in 2017; figure above from Christie et al., J. Neurophysiol., 2017

Traineeships in Computational Neuroscience are intended to provide intensive undergraduate training in computational neuroscience for students interested in eventually pursuing graduate research. The traineeships will provide approximately $5000 in stipend to support research in the summer, and $3000 each for fall and spring semesters during the academic year. Current Brandeis sophomores and juniors (classes of ’19, ’20) may apply. To be eligible to compete for this program, you must

  • have a GPA > 3.0 in Div. of Science courses
  • have a commitment from a professor to advise you on a research project related to computational neuroscience
  • have a course work plan to complete requirements for a major in the Division of Science
  • complete some additional requirements
  • intend to apply to grad school in a related field.

Interested students should apply online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQ may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at brandeis.edu> or to Prof. Paul Miller.

SciFest VII Wraps Up Summer 2017 Undergraduate Research Session

The Brandeis University Division of Science held its annual undergraduate research poster session SciFest VII on August 3, 2017, as more than one hundred student researchers presented summer’s (or last year’s) worth of independent research. We had a great audience of grad students and postdocs (many of whom were mentors), faculty, proud parents, friends, and senior administrators.

More pictures and abstract books are available at the SciFest site.

SciFest VII by numbers

Learning to see

How do we learn to see? Proper visual experience during the first weeks and months of life is critical for the proper development of the visual system. But how does experience modify neural circuits so that they exhibit the proper responses to visual stimuli? Knowledge of the mechanisms by which the brain is constructed early in development should inspire new therapies for repairing the brain if it develops improperly or is damaged by disease or injury.

At the present time, it is not possible to directly view all or even most connections within a living neural circuit. Therefore, neuroscientists often build computational models to study how these circuits may be constructed and how they may change with experience. A good model allows scientists to understand how these circuits may work in principle, and offers testable predictions that can be examined in the living animal to either support or refute the model.

Undergraduate Ian Christie ’16 was interested in understanding how neural circuits in the ferret visual system become selective to visual motion. At the time of eye opening, neurons in ferret visual cortex respond to an object moving in either of two opposite directions. With about a week of visual experience, each neuron develops a preference for only one of these directions, and greatly reduces its responses to the opposite direction.

Previous models of this process posited that the primary source of the change was in the organization and pattern of inputs to the cortex. But, recent experiments from the Van Hooser lab (Roy/Osik/Ritter et al., 2016) showed that stimulating the cortex by itself was sufficient to cause the development of motion selectivity, which suggests that some changes within the cortex itself must be underlying the increase in selectivity, at least in part. Further, other experiments in the lab of former Brandeis postdoc Arianna Maffei (Griffen et al., 2012) have shown that the cortex becomes less excitable to focal stimulation over the first weeks after eye opening.

Ian constructed families of computational models that could account for both of these observations. In the model, columns of neurons in the cortex already receive input that is slightly selective for motion in one of two opposite directions, but the connections between these cortical columns are so strong that both columns respond to both directions. However, the activity that is caused by simulated visual experience activates synaptic plasticity mechanisms in the model, that served to greatly reduce the strength of these connections between the columns, allowing motion selectivity to emerge in the cortical columns. The project was supervised by faculty members Paul Miller and Stephen Van Hooser, and the results were published in Journal of Neurophysiology (Christie et al., 2017).

Future experiments will now look for evidence of weaker connectivity between cortical neurons with visual experience.

This work was supported by the “Undergraduate and Graduate Training in Computational Neuroscience” grant to Brandeis University from NIH, and by the National Eye Institute grant EY022122. It also used the Brandeis University High Performance Computing Cluster.

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