From PhD to Life

By Craig W. Stropkay, (PhD ’13, Molecular and Cell Biology, Ren lab)

Reach for the stars, they said. You should definitely go get your PhD, you’d be great for it, they said. Well, I guess they did have a point. Pursuing my doctorate degree in Molecular Biology at Brandeis was definitely one of the most challenging things that I have ever had to do in my life. I could spend hours telling you about the long hours I spent trying to construct my dissertation or the countless nights that I had to wake up and drive into the lab from Medford just to “feed” my cells — but that’s not the point of this article. I want to talk about something that I wish was more openly discussed when I first started my journey towards pursuing a PhD. Something that I believe is important to anyone who is currently working their way towards earning their doctoral degree: a job.

Now I know what you may be thinking: why would I need to worry about a job when I know I will continue onto a postdoc and then a tenure-track academic post? Isn’t that what everyone does? That is precisely my point. Don’t get me wrong: there is absolutely nothing wrong with continuing a career in academia upon completion of your doctorate. It takes a lot of patience, skill, and dedication to remain in the field after you have literally spent years becoming an expert in everything dealing with Life Science. Maybe you’ve considered going that route, feeling that your choices are limited. Many people believe that apart from academia, their only “alternative” option is to go into industry and work in biotech or pharma.

Image from Naturejobs article

[Read more…]

Tenure-track positions in Biology (application deadline Oct 15)

The Biology Department at Brandeis University invites applications for up to two full-time, tenure-track appointments, beginning Fall 2016, from individuals who are conducting innovative research in the broad areas of molecular and cellular biology. Junior and more senior investigators will be considered, but preference will be given to hiring at the Assistant Professor level. Areas of interest range across molecular genetics, genomics and cell biology, including topics such as RNA biology, cytoskeleton, intracellular transport, development, signal transduction, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, membrane biology, and epigenetics.

The research environment at Brandeis is highly collaborative, and we seek colleagues who will complement and extend existing strengths. Brandeis offers world-class research in the setting of a small liberal-arts university. Brandeis is located 7 miles from Boston, and is part of the vibrant research community of the greater Boston area.

Brandeis recognizes that diversity in its student body, staff and faculty is important to its primary mission of providing a quality education. The search committee is therefore particularly interested in candidates who, through their research, teaching and/or service experiences, will increase Brandeis’ reputation for academic excellence and better prepare its students for a pluralistic society.

To apply, please provide the following: a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, a summary of your research accomplishments to date, including a statement of your goals for future independent research (3-page limit), up to three publications, and at least three letters of reference. Applications will be accepted only through AcademicJobsOnline at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/6064.

First consideration will be given to applications received by October 15, 2015. Following an initial evaluation by the search committee, finalists will be invited to visit the campus to discuss their research and to meet with faculty and students/postdocs. Additional inquiries may be directed to Leslie Griffith or to Paul Garrity.

Brandeis University is an equal opportunity employer, committed to supporting a culturally diverse intellectual community. Applications are particularly encouraged from applicants of groups underrepresented in the sciences.

Tenure-track faculty position in Biochemistry

The Department of Biochemistry at Brandeis University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position, to begin Fall 2014. We are searching for a creative scientist who will establish an independent research program and who in addition will maintain a strong interest in teaching Biochemistry at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The research program should address fundamental questions of biological, biochemical, or biophysical mechanism. Brandeis University offers the rare combination of a vigorous research institution in a liberal-arts college setting. The suburban campus is located 20 minutes from Boston and Cambridge and is part of the vibrant community of academic and biotechnology centers in the Boston area. The application should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of research accomplishments and future plans, copies of relevant publications, and three letters of reference. Applications will be accepted only through AcademicJobsOnline at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/3366. Additional inquiries may be directed to Dan Oprian, Professor of Biochemistry (oprian@brandeis.edu). First consideration will be given to applications received by December 1, 2013.

Brandeis University is an Equal Opportunity Employer, committed to building a culturally diverse intellectual community. We particularly welcome applications from women and minority candidates.

Tenure-track faculty position in Neuroscience and Psychology

The Department of Psychology at Brandeis University invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor position to begin in Fall 2014.  The position includes an appointment to the Neuroscience Program and to the Volen National Center for Complex Systems.  We seek an individual with an active research program that combines systems neuroscience and psychological approaches to understanding behavior and mental processes; the preferred specialty areas are learning and development, but we are open to other sub-specialties.  The position is open to applicants working with human and/or non-human animals who have shown outstanding promise as a researcher and mentor.  The successful applicant will join a vibrant research department with NIH training grants, entitled “Brain-Body-Behavior Interface in Learning and Development Across the Lifespan” and “Training in Cognitive Aging in a Social Context.”  Teaching duties will include Psychology and Neuroscience courses.  Applications, which should be submitted through AcademicJobsOnline at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/2877 should include a CV, research statement, teaching statement, copies of relevant publications, and three letters of recommendation.  First consideration will be given to candidates whose applications are complete by October 1, 2013 although we will accept applications until the position is filled.
Brandeis University is an equal opportunity employer, committed to building a culturally diverse intellectual community, and strongly encourages applications from women and minority candidates.

notice reposted from the Psychology Dept. website

The Genetics Training Grant hosts a panel discussion and lunch focused on careers outside academia

This past Monday, April 29th, students and post-docs, eager to learn more about careers outside of academia, had the opportunity to hear from, and question, panelist who have successfully harnessed their PhD experience to excel in non-academic careers. The event, hosted by the Genetics Training Grant, brought together panelists from several different fields, including scientific publishing, pharmaceutical research, consulting, and intellectual property law. The panelists were Priya Budde, Reviews Editor, The Journal of Cell Biology; Sadanand Vodala, Research Scientist, ARIAD Pharmaceuticals; Derek Buhl, Principal Scientist, Pfizer Neuroscience; Peter Bak, Consultant, Back Bay Life Science Advisors; and John Garvey, Partner, K&L Gates LLP. Each panelist spoke about their background in academia, how they made the transition to their current position, and fielded numerous questions from the audience both during the panel and at the networking lunch that followed.

The panelists gave the audience a sense of what their specific careers entail, and how skills they had acquired during their PhDs were highly relevant to their current work. Some of the transferable skills mentioned included critical thinking and the ability to quickly synthesize information and distill what is most important and interesting about a given scientific finding. These skills enabled them to be highly effective in their jobs, whether efficiently evaluating scientific manuscripts as an editor, or determining the crux of a client’s research as a consultant or intellectual property lawyer.

Current jobs for recent Brandeis Life Science PhDs (graduates 2002 and beyond, n=200)

Current jobs for recent Brandeis Life Science PhDs (Neuro, Mol Cell Biol, Biochem, Biophys graduates, 2002 and beyond, n=200)

Having completed their transition from academia to the business world, panelists were able to highlight some of key cultural and practical differences associated with working in a profit-driven industry. While Derek described his lab at Pfizer as largely mimicking an academic environment (minus the need to perpetually write grants), he and other panelists noted that, unlike academia, business evaluations are based almost exclusively on having achieved specific pre-determined goals. On the upside, for those who exceed expectations in business, there are lots of opportunities to move up the ladder. Other differences that panelists encountered in their non-academic professions included firmer deadlines, higher dressing standards, and less flexible hours.

While the majority of the discussion was specific to the panelists’ career paths, much of the advice applied to career searches in general. The importance of good networking was emphasized. Job seekers were encouraged to make the most of their networks – and their network’s network as well. Each panelist explained how he or she had acquired their job through a combination of effective networking, being proactive, and in some cases, luck. Panelists were quick to point out, though, that time and effort invested were positively correlated with “luck.”

Panelists stressed that effective networking required quickly following through with contacts, and being prepared to impress key contacts with excellent questions that demonstrate your research on a given company. They encouraged the audience to be proactive, and if needed persistent, in reaching out to people whose work they find interesting. Several panelists also emphasized the benefits of acquiring job-related experience. They noted this was a good way to both boost your resume and get a better sense of whether a given profession is the right fit for you. For example, John Garvey recommended joining a consulting or biotech club, and/or taking a business class. Getting involved in job-related activities is also excellent ways to establish good contacts for networking.

Overall the panelist presented several attractive alternatives to a traditional academic career. By carefully analyzing his or her personality, strengths, and working style, each of them had found a rewarding career that effectively utilized their scientific background/training. Priya, the editor, described how she enjoyed being able to see where scientific fields are going and staying up to date with the latest scientific breakthroughs. Derek, the pharmaceutical researcher, explained how it was gratifying for him to be working directly to develop drugs that could benefit people. John, the lawyer, explained how his work solving business problems was important because it helped provide pharmaceutical companies with the financial resources to bring new life-saving drugs to market. The general take-home message from all of the panelists was that, using the right career strategies, one can effectively use one’s PhD as a launching point to successfully pursue many different avenues outside of academia. Those interested in getting a better sense of what career might be a good fit for them are encouraged to visit http://myidp.sciencecareers.org and fill out the survey.

What do Brandeis life science PhD students go on to do?

Biotech, Health & Science Forum on Nov. 14

Cary Weir Lytle from the Hiatt Career Center writes:

I am delighted to announce that registration is open for Brandeis’ premier career event of the year for science, health and research, and this year more than 25 employers from Sloan-Kettering and Health Corps to Pfizer and Boston Healthcare for the Homeless will be attending to help you.

Brandeis University’s 4th Annual
Biotech, Health and Science Forum
“Addressing unmet medical need.”

Sponsored by the Hiatt Career Center
Nov. 14, 6:00-9:00 p.m., Sherman Function Hall

Grad Students & Post Docs RSVP Here

Undergraduate Students RSVP Here

Meet the panel

This year’s program features employers in public health, research and development, medical research, clinical care, and business… all focused on new ways to improve health and patient outcomes. (see employers list below)

Thanks,
Cary

EMPLOYER LIST

Biotech, Pharma and R&D

  • Alnylam Pharmaceuticals
  • Cubist Pharmaceuticals
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Massachusetts Life Sciences Center
  • Merrimack Pharmaceuticals
  • Millennium
  • Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR)
  • Pfizer
  • Vertex Pharmaceuticals

Hospitals & Research Institutes

  • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Boston Medical Center
  • Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Children’s Hospital Boston
  • Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • MGH, Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases (MIND)
  • US Environment Protection Agency

Public Health

  • Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program
  • Harvard School of Public Health
  • HealthCorps
  • Massachusetts Division of Health Care Finance and Policy
  • Physicians for Human Rights
  • Research Triangle Institute

Business & Emerging Health Solutions

  • Epic
  • Medical Information Technology, Inc. (MEDITECH)
  • Neuro Alert Monitoring Services
  • Safe Passage Neuromonitoring
  • Yesware

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)