Breaking the barriers to manufacture thermoplastic microfluidics!

themoplastic microfluidics figure

Thermoplastics, such as Cyclin Olefin Copolymer, are used in commercial applications of microfluidics because they are biocompatible, have good material properties such as optical clarity, low fluorescence, high toughness and are cheap to mass produce. However, there are challenges for academic labs to make thermoplastic microfluidics devices. Fabricating molds for thermoplastics is expensive and other process steps, such as sealing the chip and interfacing the chip to the lab are difficult. In a recent publication, the Fraden lab described an inexpensive method for rapid prototyping of thermoplastic microfluidics suitable for academic labs for applications such as x-ray diffraction of protein crystals produced on the same chip in which they were crystallized, or for labs seeking to manufacture a thermoplastic prototype of a microfluidic device in order to demonstrate the potential for mass production. This process will facilitate the transfer of University developed microfluidics to commercialization.

Rapid prototyping of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microfluidic devices. S. Ali Aghvami, Achini Opathalage, Z.K. Zhang, Markus Ludwig, Michael Heymann, Michael Norton, Niya Wilkins, Seth Fraden. Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical. Volume 247, August 2017, Pages 940-949.

 

Eisenbud Lectures in Mathematics and Physics set for November 27-29, 2017

The Departments of Physics and Mathematics at Brandeis University are incredibly excited to announce that this year’s Eisenbud Lectures in Mathematics and Physics will be given Prof. James P. Sethna, a theoretical physicist whose work has often carved out new directions in condensed matter physics, in its broadest interpretation.

The Eisenbud Lectures are the result of a bequest by Leonard and Ruth-Jean Eisenbud, and this year marks the 100th anniversary of Leonard Eisenbud’s birth. Leonard Eisenbud was a mathematical physicist at SUNY-Stony Brook; upon his retirement he moved to the Boston area, as his son David was a member of the Mathematics faculty at Brandeis, and was given a desk here. The bequest is for an annual lecture series by physicists and mathematicians working on the boundary between the first two fields.

Prof. Sethna has tackled traditional and highly non-traditional topics in Physics. The title of one of his recent talks is “The Statistical Mechanics of Zombies”!. “Mosh Pit Dynamics at Heavy Metal Concerts” is another example where Jim uses the tools of statistical mechanics to understand a social phenomenon. Jim is a fascinating speaker, and these lectures promise to be enlightening and entertaining in equal measure. His playful enthusiasm for science is certain to draw you in. So, try not to miss this year’s series of three Eisenbud Lectures.

The first lecture on Monday, November 27 will be on “Sloppy models, Differential geometry, and How Science Works”, and is intended for a general science audience. This lecture will be held in Gerstenzang 121 at 4 PM. The second lecture on Tuesday, November 28 will be a colloquium-style lecture entitled “Crackling Noise” and will take place in Abelson 131 at 4 PM. The final lecture, “Normal form for renormalization groups: The framework for the logs” will be delivered at 10 AM on Wednesday, November 29 in Abelson 333.

Refreshments will be served 15 minutes prior to each talk. There will be a reception in Abelson 333 following Tuesday’s talk.

Additional information is available on the lecture’s website.

We hope to see you all at what promises to be an exciting series of talks!

Searches for Tenure-Track Faculty in the Sciences, 2017

Brandeis has six open searches for tenure-track faculty in the Division of Science this fall, with the intent to strengthen cross-disciplinary studies across the sciences. We are looking forward to a busy season of intriguing seminars from candidates this winter.

  1. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. Biochemistry is looking for a creative scientist to establish an independent research program addressing fundamental questions of biological, biochemical, or biophysical mechanism, and who will maintain a strong interest in teaching Biochemistry.
  2. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Chemistry seeks a creative individual at the assistant professor level for a tenure-track faculty position in physical (especially theoretical/computational) chemistry, materials chemistry, or chemical biology.
  3. Assistant Professor of Computer Science. Computer Science invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track assistant professor, beginning Fall 2018, in the broad area of Machine Learning and Data Science, including but not limited to deep learning, statistical learning, large scale and cloud-based systems for data science, biologically inspired learning systems, and applications of analytics to real-world problems.
  4. Assistant Professor in Soft Matter or Biological Physics. Physics invites applications for the position of tenure-track Assistant Professor beginning in the fall of 2018 in the interdisciplinary areas of biophysics, soft condensed matter physics and biologically inspired material science.
  5. Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in Psychology. Psychology invites applications for a tenure track appointment at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor, with a specialization in Aging, to start August 2018. They seek an individual with an active human research program in any aspect of aging, including cognitive, social, clinical and health psychology.
  6. Tenure Track Assistant Professor in Applied MathematicsMathematics invites applications for a tenure-track position in applied mathematics at the rank of assistant professor beginning fall 2018. An ideal candidate will be expected to help to build an applied mathematics program within the department, and to interact with other science faculty at Brandeis. Candidates from all areas of applied mathematics will be considered.

Brandeis University is an equal opportunity employer, committed to building a culturally diverse intellectual community, and strongly encourages applications from women and minorities.  Diversity in its student body, staff and faculty is important to Brandeis’ primary mission of providing a quality education.  The search committees are therefore particularly interested in candidates who, through their creative endeavors, teaching and/or service experiences, will increase Brandeis’ reputation for academic excellence and better prepare its students for a pluralistic society.

Gregory Widberg named State Command Sergeant Major for the Massachusetts National Guard

Greg Widberg, Senior Mechanical Engineer in Physics, has been selected to be the 8th State Command Sergeant Major for the Massachusetts National Guard. Greg, who also performs repair work in the Division of Science, will be the senior enlisted advisor to Gary W. Keefe, Major General and The Adjutant General for the Massachusetts National Guard.

Roland Maher, Operations Manager for the Physics Department, said, As Gregory Widberg’s supervisor, I want to congratulate Greg on this opportunity with the Massachusetts National Guard.  All of us who know and respect Greg are proud of his accomplishments and wish him the all best with this wonderful opportunity. I am very sorry that we will be without Greg’s services and look forward to his return upon completion of his service to the Massachusetts National Guard.

Congratulations to Greg on his achievement!

Bjoern Penning is New Assistant Professor of Physics

Bjoern PenningBjoern Penning has joined the Physics department as a new Assistant Professor. He researches dark matter (DM) and has performed direct DM searches at the LUX-Zeplin (LZ) experiment and collider DM searches with CMS and ATLAS.

At Brandeis, he is a member of the High-Energy Physics Group. He will focus on direct dark matter searches with LZ and phenomenological dark matter research.

Penning received his Ph.D. from the University of Freiburg. Previous to his arrival at Brandeis, Penning was a Lecturer in Experimental Particle Physics at the University of Bristol.

Penning will teach Particle Physics (PHYS 107b) during the Fall 2017 semester.

Marcelle Soares-Santos Joins the Physics Department

Marcelle Soares-Santos

Marcelle Soares-Santos is joining Brandeis as an Assistant Professor in the Physics department starting in September 2017. Soares-Santos will continue her research into the nature of the accelerated expansion of the Universe.  She is also a member of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Collaboration and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Dark Energy Science Collaboration (LSST/DESC).

Nature recently profiled Marcelle in “Turning point: Galactic groundbreaker. In the article, she discusses her research, career trajectory and future plans.

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