Darwin was a field biologist

ant and treehopper (photo by Dan Perlman)

ant and treehopper (photo by Dan Perlman)

Ok, most Brandeis students don’t get to sail around the world in a wooden boat. On the other hand, over the last several years, Dan Perlman‘s Field Biology classes have produced some very nice field guides about Brandeis and its environs. In honor of Darwin’s birthday, we present:

Field Biology Electronic Field Guides

Categories include: Animals; Trees; Edible, Medicinal, and Useful Plants; Wildflowers; Fungi; Galls

BLAST (2): Computational Biology Course

If you don’t really know what BLAST is, but think you might need to, maybe COSI 178A (Computational Biology) would be a good course for you to take. Prof. Pengyu Hong will be teaching the course in the spring semester.

Microscopy (1): Quant Bio Instrumentation Lab

Want to learn the principles of microscopy? Jeff Gelles writes:

Dear Life Sciences Ph.D. students,

This semester we will again be teaching the Quantitative Biology Instrumentation Lab course, QBIO 120b.  This course, now in its third year, was developed with funding from HHMI.  The course aims to give Ph.D. students who use (or will use) optical instruments in their research practical, hands-on training in the principles and practice of light microscopy (both phase and fluorescence), absorbance spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy.  A syllabus is attached.

The course is open to all students whether or not they participate in the Quantitative Biology program.  However, space in the course is limited, so it would be a good idea for students who want to enroll to email me prior to the first meeting, which is Wed. January 14 at 2:00 in Abelson 335.  Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

Jeff Gelles

Also, don’t forget about the Quantitative Biology Bootcamp next weekend.

Bouncy, sticky, slimy chemistry

Susannah Gordon-Messer, a graduate student in the Biophysics and Structural Biology Ph. D. program, talks about her experiences with science outreach in an article in NSF Discoveries. Her work with the Discovery Museums in Acton was supported as part of a training grant awarded to Brandeis by NSF’s IGERT program.

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