Speaking of paperwork… (dissertations)

Dissertation Completion Workshop
Thursday, March 26, 4:30-5:30 p.m.
Kutz Hall, Room 130

Are you submitting your dissertation for publication in the next year? Do you know the difference between Traditional and Open publishing Access? Should you restrict or embargo your work? Do you know which forms go to Registrar and which must be given to GSAS? All these questions and many others will be covered at this workshop.

Registration is required due to space limitations. http://my.brandeis.edu/workshops/workshop?workshop_id=2222

Tax Help 101

Mark Metevier from Student Activities wrote:

[…] I have found that a shocking number of our students do not know they have to file a federal and a state(s) tax return. HR Block has generously agreed to come onto campus on Wednesday at 3:00 PM in the SCC Multipurpose Room for a Tax Help Session. There will be a short presentation on what students should look out for as first time file-ers/ as student file-ers and of course there will be a questions and answer part. […] I had this presentation for my student employees last year and it was a huge help for all of them. I strongly suggest that all student [employees] attend.

Neuroscience Movie Night

News for Neuroscience and Biology undergrads from the Neuroscience UDRs:

The first Neuroscience Movie Night will be Thursday, Feb 12th from 6-9pm in Volen 105!  We will be showing the movie Memento, a psychological thriller about a man with short-term memory loss.  The film will be followed by a discussion led by Professor John Lisman, Neuroscience Program Chair on recent findings on short-term memory. There will be FREE PIZZA as well!

Nanomaterials in cells

From Bing Xu, one of the new faculty members in the Chemistry Department here at Brandeis, comes a new review on Applications of nanomaterials inside cells. Quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, nanowires, the works.

Chloride channels and antiport mechanism

In a new paper in Journal of General Physiology, Brandeis postdoc Hyun-Ho Lim and Professor Christopher Miller examine the detailed mechanism by which a chloride transporter protein works. In particular, this protein does a rather crazy thing: it stoichiometrically swaps a proton on one side of the membrane for two Cl- ions on the other, and countertransports them across the membrane.  In this work, the authors identify a special glutamate residue on the cytoplasmic side of the protein that is responsible for picking up protons on that side in order to carry out this “antiport” mechanism.  (That glutamate is indicated by the spacefilled residue with red oxygen atoms in this depiction of the dimeric protein.)

Is my DNA fixed yet?

A broken chromosome (a double-strand DNA break) activates the DNA damage checkpoint to prevent cells from carrying out mitosis until the break has been repaired.  Repair of the break involves the modification and the removal of histone protein octamers from DNA around the break and these must be reestablished when repair is complete.  In a new paper in PNAS, Brandeis alumnus Jung-Ae Kim (Ph.D., Molecular and Cell Biology, 2008) and Professor James Haber show that when two of the major histone chaperone protein complexes (Asf1 and CAF-1) are deleted in yeast cells, their absence prevents cells from turning off the DNA damage checkpoint and hence cells stay permanently arrested.   These results suggest that cells specifically monitor the re-establishment of normal chromatin status after DNA repair.

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)