8th Annual Pepose Award Lecture moved to Monday, March 13

Professor Frank Werblin, Professor Emeritus of Neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley will receive the eighth annual Jay Pepose ’75 Award in Vision Sciences from Brandeis University on Monday, March 13 (date change due to impending snowstorm). The event will be held at 4 PM (room to be announced). At that time, Werblin will deliver a public lecture titled, “The Evolution of Retinal Science over the Last 50 Years.”

During his research, Professor Werblin identified a number of cellular correlates underlying visual information processing in the retina. He has authored many articles in peer-reviewed journals, and has contributed articles on retinal circuitry to the Handbook of Brain Microcircuits (Oxford University Press) and retinal processing in the Encyclopedia of the Eye (Elsevier). Werblin founded Visionize in 2013, a company dedicated to helping patients suffering from vision diseases that cannot be corrected with glasses or surgery.

The Pepose Award is funded by a $1 million endowment established in 2009 through a gift from Jay Pepose ’75, MA’75, P’08, P’17, and Susan K. Feigenbaum ’74, P’08, P’17, his wife. Pepose is the founder and medical director of the Pepose Vision Institute in St. Louis and a professor of clinical ophthalmology at Washington University. He founded and serves as board president of the Lifelong Vision Foundation, whose mission is to preserve lifelong vision for people in the St. Louis community, nationally and internationally through research, community programs and education programs. While a student at Brandeis, he worked closely with John Lisman, the Zalman Abraham Kekst Chair in Neuroscience and professor of biology at Brandeis.

“Exceptionally Helpful” Matthew Headrick Receives Award

Associate Professor of Physics Matthew Headrick was named by the American Physical Society as an Outstanding Referee for 2017. The award recognizes “scientists who have been exceptionally helpful in assessing manuscripts for publication in the APS journals”. Headrick, who works in string theory and related areas of theoretical physics, is one of 150 Outstanding Referees named this year, out of about 60,000 active referees for the APS journals. Headrick is not the only Brandeis physicist to have received this honor; Robert Meyer, now Emeritus Professor, was named an Outstanding Referee in 2011.

Headrick’s research is primarily focused on the intersection of quantum gravity, quantum field theory, and quantum information theory. He is specifically interested in information-theoretic aspects of holographic field theories (field theories that are dual to higher-dimensional gravitational theories), such as entanglement entropies and related quantities.

Leslie Griffith Receives SASTRA-Obaid Siddiqi Award

SASTRA award


Model depicts how the integration of light, ambient temperature, the circadian clock and homeostatic sleep drive sets the balance between daytime and nighttime sleep [Parisky, K.M., Agosto Rivera, J.L., Donelson, N.C., Kotecha, S. and Griffith, L.C. (2016) “Reorganization of sleep by temperature in Drosophila requires light, the homeostat and the circadian clock” Curr Biol 26:882-892]

Leslie C. Griffith, Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Volen National Center for Complex Systems, has received the SASTRA–Obaid Siddiqi Award for excellence in life sciences. The prize is given by the Shanmugha Arts, Science, Technology & Research Academy (SASTRA) University in Thanjavur, India. Siddiqi was a pioneering molecular biologist and founder of the Molecular Biology Unit of the Tata Institute for Fundamental Research.

Griffith’s interests range from the biochemistry of neuronal signal transduction, in particular the role of CaMKII in memory formation, to the hierarchical relationships between complex behaviors such as sleep and learning. She has contributed to our understanding of these issues using genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster and believes that model systems have an important place in pioneering the understanding of basic biological processes. Her lab has been active in developing tools that allow interrogation of molecular and cellular processes with temporal and spatial resolution in freely behaving animals to bridge the molecule-behavior gap.

Griffith received the award on February 28, 2017.

Dynamics of GreB-RNA polymerase interaction

Larry Tetone, Larry Friedman, and Melissa Osborne, and collaborators from the Gelles lab (Brandeis University) and the Landick lab (University of Wisconsin-Madison) used multi-wavelength single-molecule fluorescence methods to for the first time directly observe the dynamic binding and dissociation of an accessory protein with an RNAP during active transcript elongation.

Their findings are detailed in the recent paper “Dynamics of GreB-RNA polymerase interaction.” (PNAS, published online 1/30/2017).

Read more at The Little Engine Shop blog

Mediating the early response to acute hypoxia

Neurons in the brain require a continuous supply of oxygen for normal activity. If the level of oxygen in the brain decreases—for example when a blood vessel becomes blocked—neurons begin to die, and permanent brain damage can result. A shortage of oxygen first causes sodium ion channels within the surface membrane of the neurons to open. Sodium ions then flow into the cells through these open channels to trigger a cascade of events inside the cells that ultimately results in their death.

In “SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels mediates the early response to acute hypoxia in central neurons” (Elife), Plant et al. now reveal how oxygen deficiency, otherwise known as hypoxia, rapidly increases the flow of sodium ions into brain cells. By inducing hypoxia in neurons from rat brain, Plant et al. show that a lack of oxygen causes SUMOylation, a process whereby a series of enzymes work together to attach a Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (or SUMO) protein, of specific sodium ion channels in under a minute. The channels linked to the SUMO protein, a subtype called Nav1.2, open more readily than unmodified channels, allowing more sodium ions to enter the neurons.

Plant et al. study granule cells of the cerebellum, the most numerous type of neuron in the human brain. Further investigation is required to determine if SUMOylation of Nav1.2 channels underlies the response of other neurons to hypoxia as well. It also remains to be discovered whether molecules that block the SUMOylation of Nav1.2 channels, or that prevent the flow of sodium ions through these channels, could reduce the number of brain cells that die in low-oxygen conditions such as stroke.

doi: 10.7554/eLife.20054.
SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels mediates the early response to acute hypoxia in central neurons
Leigh D Plant, Jeremy D Marks, Steve AN Goldstein
eLife 2016;5:e20054

The 7th Annual SPROUT Awards Are Available

Post written by Fern Shamis.

The 7th Annual SPROUT Awards are back and want to help you bring your research and entrepreneurial ambitions to life! Have a great idea? Does your research have the ability to impact the world? Need funding support to make your innovation a reality? Consider applying for a SPROUT award.

In the past, successful SPROUT applications have come from all departments in the sciences including Biology, Biochemistry, Physics, and Chemistry.  Past candidates have proposed projects ranging from early-stage research and development to patent-ready projects.  Many undergraduates, graduates, staff and faculty have all pitched various projects from a Therapy for the Diseases of Aging (Anne Lawson, Hedstrom lab), to a Circadian Rhythm Incubating Device (Jae Jung, Rosbash lab) and the use of carrot fiber as an antidiabetic (Michelle Landstrom, Hayes lab) to a panel of outside judges in the hopes of receiving funding.   Articles about past SPROUT winners are available on Brandeis Now.  A list of additional winners and their executive summaries are also available online.

This year, the award pool once again is up to $100,000 to be dispersed among this year’s successful candidates.  The final deadline for preliminary applications is February 20th by 11 p.m.  Information sessions will be held on Thursday, February 2nd, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. in Volen 201 and on Tuesday, February 7th, 3:00.-4:00 p.m. Shapiro Science Center, 1st Floor Library.  More information and to submit our preliminary application is available on the SPROUT website!

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