DeRosier wins Distinguished Scientist Award from Microscopy Society of America

Professor Emeritus of Biology (and current Turrigiano lab “postdoc”) David DeRosier received the Distinguished Scientist Award (for Biological Science) at this year’s annual meeting of the Microscopy Society of America.

 

Hall, Rosbash and Young Share Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine

The 10th annual Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine has been awarded jointly to Michael Rosbash and Jeffrey Hall of Brandeis and Michael Young of Rockefeller University. The trio are once again being honored for their discovery of molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms. Hall is Emeritus Professor of Biology at Brandeis, and Rosbash is Peter Gruber Endowed Chair in Neuroscience, Professor of Biology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator.

The Shaw Prize, established under the auspices of Mr Run Run Shaw, honours individuals, regardless of race, nationality, gender and religious belief, who have achieved significant breakthrough in academic and scientific research or applications and whose work has resulted in a positive and profound impact on mankind. There are three annual prizes: Astronomy, Life Science and Medicine, and Mathematical Sciences, each bearing a monetary award of one million US dollars. The presentation ceremony is scheduled for Monday, 23 September 2013.

Update: There a couple of really nice videos on YouTube from the Pearl Report (TVB in Hong Kong) that discuss the science and the history behind this prize.

Asher Preska Steinberg ’13 receives NSF Graduate Fellowship

steinbergAsher Preska Steinberg ’13, who majored in both chemistry and physics at Brandeis, has been awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship in materials research.  The fellowships, which are awarded based on a national competition, provide three full years of support for Ph.D. research and are highly valued by students and institutions.

At Brandeis, Asher worked on his senior thesis in chemistry with Professor Milos Dolnik as part of the Epstein Group. They studied the growth dynamics of Turing patterns in photosensitive reaction-diffusion systems. As part of the 2011 NYU MRSEC Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program Asher worked with Paul Chaikin to study active colloids, and they recently published an article in Science entitled “Living Crystals of Light-Activated Colloidal Surfers”. The article received attention from the press, including the LA Times, Wired, and Ars Technica.  Last summer Asher participated in the Columbia EFRC Research Program for Undergraduates (RPU) and studied silver plasmonic nanoparticles with Louis Brus.

Asher will be attending California Institute of Technology this coming fall in the field of Chemical Physics.

Hall, Rosbash, and Young share Wiley Prize

menetfig1The 12th annual Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences has been awarded jointly to Michael Rosbash and Jeffrey Hall of Brandeis and Michael Young of Rockefeller University. The trio are once again being honored for their work on the molecular mechanisms governing circadian rhythms (see more on this site)

Ye Zhang wins Materials Research Society Poster Award

Ye Zhang, a Postdoctoral Fellow from Prof. Bing Xu’s research group at Brandeis, won the 2012 MRS Fall Meeting Poster Awards for her poster titled Self-oscillatory Hydrogels Driven by Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction within the symposium on Bioinspired Directional Surfaces-From Nature to Engineered Textured Surfaces & Precision Polymer Materials-Fabricating Functional Assemblies, Surfaces, Interfaces, and Devices. The goal of the project is to make materials that operate like synthetic cardiac or intestinal muscles; feed them and they will pump forever, or as long as the arteries remain open. Ye, the poster’s lead author, is a member of the Brandeis Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) working on project involving the groups of Profs. Bing Xu, Irving Epstein and Seth Fraden of the Chemistry and Physics Departments.

Ye’s work focuses on the development and study of active matter based on non-linear chemical dynamics, specifically the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. Beginning two years ago she systematically modified a class of gels that exhibit periodic volume oscillations which were produced by other groups. First, Ye succeeded in significantly improving the amplitude of volume oscillations. Next, she developed several novel self-oscillatory systems and established a systematic way to improve the bulk material properties of the synthetic heart.  To build a reliable beating heart, Ye optimized the molecules building the material at the molecular level of tens to hundreds of atoms, or scales of 1 nm and then figured out how to assemble them into networks of polymers on the scales of 10 – 100 nm, and then further assembled them on a longer length scale, into elastic networks on the scales of microns, and finally sculpted the resulting rubbery materials using photolithographic and microfluidic methods into useful shapes for study and application. Ye’s award is a recognition of her contribution to molecular engineering and serves as a quintessential example of the  “bottom-up” construction methods exemplified by the interdisciplinary teams of the Brandeis MRSEC.

The best battalion in the National Guard

Gregory Widberg is the Sr. Mechanical Engineer in the Physics department who also works with other departments in the Division of Science repairing scientific equipment.  Greg was called to active duty and served in Afghanistan from 2011 to 2012 as the Command Sgt. Major for the 1st Battalion, 182nd Infantry Regiment.  Greg is shown accepting the Walter T. Kerwin Jr. Readiness Award in a ceremony in Washington, DC on October 23, 2012.  The award is presented to the battalion with the highest level of readiness in its respective component.

General Raymond Odierno, chief of staff, U. S. Army, Lt Col. Ron Cupples, commander, 1st Battalion, 182nd Infantry Regiment, Massachusetts Army National Guard, Command Sgt. Maj. Greg Widberg, senior enlisted advisor, 1st Battalion, 182nd Infantry Regiment, Massachusetts Army National Guard, and Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Chandler III, Sgt. Maj. of the Army, pose for a picture after Odinero presented the Walter T.Kerwin Jr. Readiness Award to Cupples and Widberg during a ceremony at the Association of the United States Army Eisenhower Luncheon as the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington D.C., Oct. 23, 2012. The Kerwin Award, which is open to Army National Guard and Army Reserve battalions, is presented to the battalion with the highest level of readiness in it’s respective component. In order to be considered each battalion must have been rated as having superior performance in eight specific areas as well as meeting other specific criteria. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jerry Saslav, Massachusetts National Guard Public Affairs)

Bisphenol A researchers win Gabbay Award

Bisphenol A (BPA) has been used in the synthesis of polycarbonate plastics over the years. BPA is also a powerful estrogen analog. Three researchers, Patricia Hunt (Washington State Univ.), Ana Soto (Tufts) and Carlos Sonnenschein (Tufts), will today be awarded the 2012 Jacob Heskel Gabbay Award for their work identifying the cellular and developmental effects of BPA exposure. The three will lecture today, Oct. 22, at 3:30 pm in Rapaporte Treasure Hall, Goldfarb Library.

see also story at BrandeisNOW

Massry Prize for Hall, Rosbash, and Young

Brandeis scientists Michael Rosbash and Jeff Hall, along with Michael Young (Rockefeller Univ.) will receive the 2012 Massry Prize, according to Brandeis NOW. The prize, established in 1996 by the Meira and Shaul G. Massry Foundation,   honors “outstanding contributions to the biomedical sciences and the advancement of health“. This trio of researchers has garnered several prizes already for their contributions to understanding the mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms.

The winners will receive the prize and present lectures on October 29, 2012 at the University of Southern California.

There will be a couple of opportunities to hear Michael Rosbash talk about circadian rhythms locally, first at the Inaugural Lecture for the Gruber chair on Thursday, then at the Brandeis Café Science fall season opener on October 1.

 

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