Two new faculty members join the Chemistry department

The Chemistry department welcomes two new Assistant Professors who will be arriving on-campus in the summer/fall 2018.

Rebecca L.M. Gieseking

Rebecca GiesekingRebecca Gieseking‘s research is focused on developing computational models to understand materials for emerging energy technologies in the fields of solar energy, batteries, and fuel generation. The critical steps in these technologies involve electron transfer at complex interfaces. Her work will focus on revealing design principles that connect molecular structure to the important material properties required for these applications.​​

She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University working with George Schatz and Mark Ratner. She received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Georgia Tech and a B.S. in Chemistry and Studio Art from Furman University.​

Grace Han

Grace HanGrace Han will be joining the Department of Chemistry as a new Assistant Professor in July 2018. Her research focuses on the design and synthesis of light-responsive organic materials for various applications such as energy conversion, storage, and optoelectronics.

Grace received her PhD from the Department of Chemistry at MIT in 2015. She has been a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT after the graduation. At Brandeis, she will be teaching Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 121) in the Spring 2019.

Advanced spectroscopy reveals mechanism of vectorial action in a membrane pump

Judith Herzfeld research imageSome proteins in cell membranes are responsible for actively pumping desired molecules in or unwanted molecules out. Since their discovery, it has been expected that their vectorial action involves the existence of two protein conformations, one in which the active site has a low affinity for substrate and is open to the discharge side of the membrane and the other in which the active site has a high affinity for substrate and is open to the uptake side of the membrane. The driver of the pump is a source of energy that converts the pump from the lower energy state to the higher energy state, from which it can relax back and begin the cycle anew.

However, this model has never fit the longest-studied pump, the light-driven ion pump bacteriorhodopsin. At rest, the active site has a high proton affinity but is open to the discharge side of the membrane. Disruption of the active site by light reduces the proton affinity, but it has been a decades-long mystery how this occurs while maintaining access to the discharge side of the membrane. This mystery has now been solved through advanced spectroscopic studies of photocycle intermediates trapped at low temperatures. Obtained collaboratively by Judith Herzfeld’s group at Brandeis and Robert Griffin’s group at MIT, the spectra trace the establishment of an essential U-shaped pathway to the discharge side of the membrane. The results also explain how this pathway is broken as soon as the proton is released, thereby preventing back flow and enforcing the vectorial action of the pump.

“Primary transfer step in the light-driven ion pump bacteriorhodopsin: an irreversible U-turn revealed by DNP-enhanced MAS NMR.” Qing Zhe Ni, Thach Van Can, Eugenio Daviso, Marina Belenky, Robert G. Griffin, and Judith Herzfeld. J. Am. Chem. Soc., DOI: 10.1021/jacs.8b00022. Publication Date (Web): February 28, 2018

SciFest VII Wraps Up Summer 2017 Undergraduate Research Session

The Brandeis University Division of Science held its annual undergraduate research poster session SciFest VII on August 3, 2017, as more than one hundred student researchers presented summer’s (or last year’s) worth of independent research. We had a great audience of grad students and postdocs (many of whom were mentors), faculty, proud parents, friends, and senior administrators.

More pictures and abstract books are available at the SciFest site.

SciFest VII by numbers

2nd Boston Symposium of Encoded Library Platforms was held Aug. 4

BSELP imageThe Brandeis Chemistry Department, together with GlaxoSmithKline and Pharmaron, is hosting the 2nd Boston Symposium of Encoded Library Platforms on August 4th in the Shapiro Theater. This symposium will feature 8 speakers from industry and academic labs, covering the newest developments in the technology of encoded small molecule libraries and related topics.

For several decades, major efforts have gone into discovering drug leads by high-throughput screening, in which “libraries” of thousands to millions of random compounds are tested in a highly repetitive fashion for biological activity, such as the ability to inhibit an enzyme. A new and elegant alternative to this process is the use of encoded libraries, in which each random molecule within the library bears a “tag” of DNA with a unique sequence. Libraries containing hundreds of millions of DNA-tagged compounds can be incubated with a target protein in a single tube, and those which bind to the target can be identified by high-throughput sequencing of the DNA barcodes in the protein-bound fraction. This approach has gained great popularity in the last few years, and is just this week the cover story of Chemical & Engineering News.

Research Funding For Undergrads: MRSEC Summer Materials Undergraduate Research Fellowships

The Division of Science wishes to announce that, in 2017, we will offer seven MRSEC Summer  Materials Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SMURF) for Brandeis students doing undergraduate research, sponsored by the Brandeis Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

The fellowship winners will receive $5,000 stipends (housing support is not included) to engage in an intensive and rewarding research and development program that consists of full-time research in a MRSEC lab, weekly activities (~1-2 hours/week) organized by the MRSEC Director of Education, and participation in SciFest VII on Aug 3, 2017.

The due date for applications is February 27, 2017, at 6:00 PM EST.

To apply, the application form is online and part of the Unified Application: (Brandeis login required).


Students are eligible if they will be rising Brandeis sophomores, juniors, or seniors in Summer 2017 (classes of ’18, ’19, and ’20). No prior lab experience is required. A commitment from a Brandeis MRSEC member to serve as your mentor in Summer 2017 is required though. The MRSEC faculty list is:

Conflicting Commitments
SMURF recipients are expected to be available to do full time laboratory research between May 30 – August 4, 2017. During that period, SMURF students are not allowed to take summer courses, work another job or participate in extensive volunteer/shadowing experiences in which they commit to being out of the lab for a significant amount of time during the summer. Additionally, students should not be paid for doing lab research during this period from other funding sources.

Application Resources
Interested students should apply online (Brandeis login required). Questions that are not answered in the online FAQ may be addressed to Steven Karel <divsci at>.

How different metals stick together

Editor: Tamara Hanna JEM: Esther RTP: Bryan Nolte

Cover artwork from Inorganic Chemistry featuring paper from the Thomas group

Metal-metal interactions are at the heart of some of the most interesting metal-catalyzed transformations and are found everywhere from Nature (metalloenzymes) to industrially important heterogeneous catalysis (surfaces, nanomaterials).  While textbooks have been written about metal-metal multiple bonds, surprising gaps in knowledge remain, including bonding between first row transition metals and bonding between different metals.  The Thomas group in the Brandeis Chemistry Department seeks to fill these gaps in knowledge through the systematic synthesis of heterobimetallic complexes featuring a wide range of different transition metals and developing a thorough understanding of the electronic structure and bonding of these novel compounds.

The latest issue of Inorganic Chemistry features cover artwork highlighting the recent paper from the Thomas laboratory titled “Exploring Trends in Metal–Metal Bonding, Spectroscopic Properties, and Conformational Flexibility in a Series of Heterobimetallic Ti/M and V/M Complexes (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu).” The paper describes an extensive study of a series of Ti/M and V/M heterobimetallic complexes, where M is systematically varied across the periodic table from left to right (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu).  These complexes are classified as “early/late” heterobimetallic complexes because they feature one metal from the left half of the periodic table (“early”) and one metal from the right half of the periodic table (“late”).  The inherent differences between the properties of the two metals makes their metal-metal bonding quite polar and sensitive to a variety of different factors, but also poises these compounds for interesting reactivity because of the two electronically different metal sites presented. This latest installation from the Thomas group uncovers trends in metal-metal bond distance determined using X-ray crystallography, and uses a variety of spectroscopic (EPR, NMR, Mossbauer) and computational tools to probe the electronic structure of these compounds.  Most interestingly, these compounds are shown to be conformationally flexible, with ligand rearrangements occurring rapidly in solution and this ligand hemilability, which is ideal for facilitating reactivity, can be correlated directly with the strength of metal-metal interactions.

This paper was highly collaborative and its preparation involved researchers from both Brandeis and Harvard University. The synthesis and characterization of the new compounds were largely carried out by Bing Wu, a graduate student in the Thomas group, along with Chris Thomas herself. Matt Wilding, a recent Ph.D. graduate student from the Betley laboratory at Harvard University, assisted with the collection and interpretation of Mossbauer data and designed the cover artwork. Recent Ph.D. graduate Mark Bezpalko, of the Thomas/Foxman groups, and Bruce Foxman carried out all of the structural work in the Brandeis X-ray Diffraction Facility, and all of the computational studies were carried out by Bing Wu and Chris Thomas using the Brandeis high performance cluster.

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