Waltz Symposium on Sept 23

Artificial Intelligence luminaries from across the nation gathered at Brandeis on Sunday Sept 23 to honor David Waltz, who was a professor at Brandeis from 1984-1993 and who passed away in March from cancer. Organized by Prof. Jordan Pollack with sponsorship from Brandeis, AAAI, and Ab Initio Software, the day long event featured keynotes and panels from 6 different phases of Waltz’s career reflecting on his work and his leadership. A complete schedule follows the break and video, when available, is on the Computer Science website.

Studifi

With the advent of web applications and mobile devices, students in Computer Science are becoming more and more entrepreneurial during their stay at university. A stream or new and intriguing applications built by students has been emerging from Brandeis.

Studifi ® is a collaboration platform for students, developed by Thomas Lextrait, graduate student at Brandeis. It is hosted in the cloud and offers free service. Students can use Studifi to find, manage and collaborate(*) on projects, while instructors can use it to manage student teams within their classes. The platform allows students to find teammates within their classes as well as look for projects at other universities across the globe.

Studifi generates revenue by allowing landlords to post local apartments and companies to post jobs. These are matched with students to create targeted yet relevant advertisement, adding value to the platform.

(*) Brandeis students should consult course instructors before collaborating on projects, and should be cognizant of the rules laid out in section 4 of the Rights and Responsibilities handbook.

JBS Computer Science Product Showcase 2012

The JBS Computer Science Product Showcase will take place on Thursday 8/2/2012 in the main Auditorium of the Mandel Center from 2:00-4:00

Tim Hickey and Pito Salas will present a short overview of this year’s Justice Brandeis Semester in Web Applications and Social Networks, and then each of four student groups will present the product they created this summer. There are four products that involve a database-backed web application and possibly a mobile component as well. The products are listed below, with a little suggestion of their purpose:

  • Spy Game: a new genre of Augmented Reality phone games
  • WikiWitness: an archive for first person reports of historical events
  • Volunteerhours.org: LinkedIn for volunteers
  • Where’s My Lane: civic hacking for Boston bike commuters

The JBS program covered not only the technical aspects of how to create a database backed website that could efficiently handle hundreds of millions of records, but also covered the practice of computer science and software entrepreneurship. The students will give 10-15 minute presentations with 5-10 minutes of discussion.

Followup: story at BrandeisNOW

Natural Language Annotation for Machine Learning

From the Computer Science Department blog:

James Pustejovsky and his student Amber Stubbs have a new book “Natural Language Annotation for Machine Learning” out from O’Reilly Books and Media: “Systems exist for analyzing existing corpora, but making a new corpus can be extremely complex. To help you build a foundation for your own machine learning goals, this easy-to-use guide includes case studies that demonstrate four different annotation tasks in detail. You’ll also learn how to use a lightweight software package for annotating texts and adjudicating the annotations.”

Teaching awards for Hickey & Thomas

Professor of Computer Science Tim Hickey and Assistant Professor of Chemistry Christine Thomas are among the 2012 winners of major Brandeis teaching awards.  Hickey won the Lerman-Neubauer ’69 Prize for Excellence in Teaching and Mentoring. Thomas received the Michael L. Walzer ’56 Award for Teaching.

Among the comments from student nominators:

When I first met Professor Hickey in the fall of my first year during my COSI 2A class, he was incredibly knowledgeable, patient, encouraging and caring about our progress in his class…

Professor Christine Thomas might be the most dedicated, passionate teacher I have ever had…

See the full story at Brandeis NOW.

American Academy of Arts & Sciences elects Turrigiano, Luo and Berger.

The American Academy of Arts & Sciences recently announced its 2012 class of Fellows, including 3 current and former Brandeis scientists.

Professor of Biology Gina Turrigiano and graduate alumnus Liqun Luo (PhD ’92, Biology) were elected in the Neurosciences, Cognitive Sciences, and Behavioral Biology section. Undergraduate alumna Bonnie Berger ’83 was elected in the Mathematics section.

Turrigiano’s lab works on the plasticity of synaptic and intrinsic properties of cortical neurons and circuits. Turrigiano has been previously honored with a MacArthur Fellowship and with the Human Frontier Science Program Nakasone Award for “frontier-moving research in biology“. Luo, who did his graduate research with Kalpana White at Brandies,  is now Professor of Biology at Stanford University and an HHMI Investigator. His lab studies how neural circuits are organized and assembled during development. Berger discovered her interest and talent for math as an undergraduate at Brandeis, graduating with a degree in computer science. She obtained her PhD at MiT, where she is now Professor of Applied Mathematics and head of the Computation and Biology group at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). Berger has continued to support Brandeis through her active membership in the Brandeis University Science Advisory Council.

The American Academy of Arts & Sciences elects leaders in the academic disciplines, the arts, business, and public affairs. Among the others elected this year are Mel Brooks, Clint Eastwood, Frederica von Stade, Melinda Gates and Hilary Clinton.

See also Brandeis NOW.

UPDATE (5/1/2012): Liqun Luo was elected to the National Academy of Sciences this year.

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)