MRSEC offers 2 one-week courses in Summer 2017

Brandeis’ MRSEC is offering two one-week courses in June 2017. “Introduction to Microfluidics Technology” and “Biomaterials: Kinesin Production for Beginners” are both hands-on laboratory courses with no prerequisites.

  • Introduction to Microfluidics Technology
    Date: June 19-23, 2017
    This course is intended for graduate students, post docs, faculty, and industrial scientists/engineers interested in utilizing microfluidic technology in their work, both in the physical and life sciences
  • Biomaterials: Kinesin Production for Beginners
    Date: June 26-30, 2017
    This course is intended for graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and industrial scientists/engineers interested in laboratory-scale expression and purification of kinesins, the biomolecular motors that power Brandeis MRSEC’s highly regarded active liquid crystals. The course is suitable for non-biologists who do not have access to any major specialized equipment at their home institution, since the goal of the course is to make protein production accessible to a wider variety of labs.

Register early (by March 1) for a $50 discount. Regular registration for both courses closes March 31, 2017.

Both courses are sponsored by the National Science Foundation’s Bioinspired Soft Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) at Brandeis.

JBS Offers “Bio-Inspired Design” Course

Maria de Boef Miara, Lecturer in Biology at Brandeis University, will be leading a course titled Bio-Inspired Design this summer (June 1 thru August 7, 2015). Bio-Inspired Design is part of the Justice Brandeis Semester (JBS). JBS combines courses and experiential learning to provide complete, immersive experiences so students can deeply examine a specific area of study.

Bio-Inspired Design is designed for students from a wide spectrum of disciplines, but may be particularly appealing to students in Biology, Biological Physics, Environmental Studies or HSSP areas. This is a 10-week course providing 12 credits.

Students in Bio-Inspired Design will spend the summer working with biologists, engineers and artists in a variety of settings. They will explore intriguing life forms and develop the quantitative tools needed to work at the intersection of form and function.

New team-taught course offered spring 2014: “Differential geometry in classical and quantum mechanics”

1) Introduction and Motivation

We would like to call attention to a new class offered this winter/spring 2014 quarter, being taught jointly by Prof. Daniel Ruberman in Mathematics and Prof. Albion Lawrence in Physics.  This is being listed jointly as Physics 202a (Quantum Field Theory) and Math 221b (Topics in Topology).  It is being team-taught under the auspices of the Brandeis Geometry and Dynamics IGERT program.

This course aims to introduce basic notions of fiber bundles and connections on them, and their application to basic physical examples in classical and quantum mechanics: especially the mechanics of deformable bodies, and Berry’s phase.  The target audience is mathematics and physics students, and mathematically inclined students in physical chemistry, neuroscience, computer science, and economics.  The essential principles here find applications to chemical and neural oscillators and control theory; there have even been suggestions that it is a useful language for describing currency trading.

The mathematics covered here typically appears in advanced courses on quantum and statistical field theory.  However, it has much broader applicability, and the instructors felt that studying more elementary physics examples better highlighted the essential mathematics and lead to a broader perspective that would better prepare students to find new and creative uses for the mathematics.  Furthermore, they allow us to teach a broader audience, as the essential physics background is straightforward and can be explained without the student needing two years of graduate-level physics courses.

This course is essentially a graduate course, but it is certainly appropriate for senior undergraduates with a solid mathematical background (math and physics majors especially).  The modern mathematical language of manifolds and vector bundles will be introduced and used throughout, but with reference to physical and geometric notions.  This will provide physics students with an appropriate vocabulary for further study, while mathematics students can try to grasp the intuition behind the formalism.  Note that the course satisfies one of the IGERT course requirements; however, we strongly encourage non-IGERT students to enroll.

The course is scheduled to take place Mondays and Wednesdays from 2-3:20pm. [Read more…]

Courses for Spring 2013 (I): Advanced NMR spectroscopy

Course registration for Spring 2013 has opened. I asked faculty to share details about new (and old) exciting and different courses being offered this spring.

Tom Pochapsky (Chemistry) writes:
Product Details

We are offering our CHEM 146 “Advanced NMR spectroscopy” course again in the spring, appropriate for grads and advanced undergrads in physics, chem, biochem, biophysics.   Pre-reqs are Physics 10 or equivalent, Math 10 or equivalent.   There is a laboratory component this year (using the 800), intro to theory of NMR and practical applications.  The text for the course is our book [ed.: NMR for Physical and Biological Scientists (Thomas Pochapsky and Susan Sondej Pochapsky, authors)], now available as an e-book.

 

New course on Genomic Health Care

Professor Barbara Lerner will teach a new course, BIOL 235b American Health Policy & Practice and the Delivery of Genomic Health Care, in Spring Semester, 2012. The course is now scheduled for Block X2,  Tuesdays from 6:30 PM–9:20 PM. Enrollment is limited to Genetic Counseling or Health Policy graduate students or with permission of the instructor.

The continuous discovery of genetic markers for common diseases is leading to an increasing demand for genetic services, and for the integration of traditional medical genetics with mainstream medicine and public health care. In addition, the American healthcare system is evolving and huge changes in how care is accessed, financed and delivered can be expected in the coming years. Those providing genetic services will therefore need a strong background in the structure of the American healthcare system and how public policy is influencing the field of medical genetics. This course is specifically designed to meet this objective using a mixture of readings from the literature, writing assignments, lecture, class discussion, guest speakers, and student presentations.

New course on RNA

Professors Michael Rosbash and Nelson Lau will teach a new version of BIOL 176b RiboNucleicAcids (RNA) in Spring Semester, 2012. The course is now scheduled for Block S8   W 9:00 AM–11:50 AM.

RNA is a central molecule of all living organisms.  RNA is extremely versatile and can function as an information storage and transfer device, an enzyme, a regulator of gene expression, or a cellular scaffold.   As biologists discover new types of RNAs and new functions for these different types, students must become aware of this progress to gain a complete view of the integral nature of RNA in all branches of the life sciences.

This seminar course will be a weekly discussion of primary literature that broadly covers key breakthroughs in this important subfield of molecular biology. We will examine the versatility and biological functions of RiboNucleicAcides (RNA) in an upper-level seminar and primary-literature based course.Topics include splicing and the spliceosome, the ribosome, ribozymes and the RNA World Hypothesis, RNA editing, RNA interference, and long non-coding RNAs.

This course intends to educate students to become experts on the diverse biological function of RNA.  This course is designed for fulfilling the science requirement for Biology majors. Students will learn how to read the primary literature on classic and recent discoveries concerning RNA.

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