Food innovations at Brandeis: Carrot fiber proves more effective in control of blood glucose levels

This is the second in a series of posts highlighting food science discoveries at Brandeis. These functional innovations help lower cholesterol, find novel uses for antioxidants and healthy fats and develop process improvements.

Carrot pomace - Adobe Stock imageCarrot pomace powder (CPP) is currently a dried “waste” material generated during the production of carrot juice, but Brandeis inventors Daniel Perlman and K.C. Hayes have discovered that CPP may represent a dietary breakthrough. When carrot pomace powder is isolated using the proprietary process developed by Perlman and Hayes, it becomes highly enriched in both soluble and insoluble fibers while maintaining a low sugar-to-fiber ratio. This means that carrot pomace powder is an excellent new fiber product that can be adapted for commercial food production. Food manufacturers can use it to reduce blood glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, while having a major positive impact on the gut bacterial flora.

This patent pending process is significant given that the market for dietary fibers in foods and beverages is expected to reach $6.5 billion by 2022.

Read more about carrot fiber, the Brandeis Office of Technology and Licensing and the research behind this discovery.

Food Innovations at Brandeis: Brewing a Better Cup of Coffee

This is the first in a series of posts highlighting food science discoveries at Brandeis. These functional innovations help lower cholesterol, find novel uses for antioxidants and healthy fats and develop process improvements.

A lot of science goes into brewing that cup of coffee from a single-serve pod used in the very popular automatic brewing machines. The best results during the 25-30 second brewing process comes from carefully balancing the coffee particle grind size and the rate of water flow through the pods that optimizes the extraction of flavor, caffeine, color, and anti-oxidants from the beans. If particle sizes are too small in the pods, they clog the filter and prevent or slow brewing. If the particle sizes are too large, extraction is inefficient during brewing and more coffee must be used to obtain positive results.

Daniel Perlman, Senior Research Scientist and Inventor in the Physics department at Brandeis, has invented and patented a low-cost solution that decreases the cost of goods and increases gross margins by using less coffee in each pod for the same brewed taste.

Read more about this new process and the Brandeis Office of Technology and Licensing.

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