Actin assembly and colorectal cancer

A new paper in J. Cell Biology from Bruce Goode’s lab by postdoc Kyoko Okada and co-workers finds that Adenomatous polyposis coli protein nucleates actin assembly. This may suggest a potential role of APC in suppressing tumors through its effects on actin assembly.

BIOL 99 AND NEUR 99 Senior Honors Talks

Senior honors presentations and defenses for Biology and Neuroscience are this week and next Monday.

Name      Faculty Sponsor & Committee  Time & Location of Talk

Biol 99

Alicia Bach Dagmar Ringe, Neil Simister, Liz Hedstrom May 10   3 pm    Bassine 251
Kristin Little Bruce Goode, Joan Press, Satoshi Yoshida May 6    10 am    Bassine 251
Spencer Rittner KC Hayes, Carolyn Cohen, Larry Wangh May 6    3 pm      Bassine 251
Danielle Saly Michael Rosbash, Mike Marr, Nelson Lau May 10   11 am   Bassine 251
Sue Yen Tay Jim Haber, Sue Lovett, Joan Press  May 7    11am     Bassine 251
Alan Tso Daniela Nicastro, Liz Hedstrom, Greg Petsko May 10   2 pm    Bassine 251
Hannah Worchel Jim Morris, Ruibao Ren, Paul Garrity   May 6    2 pm     Bassine 251

Neur 99
Sarah Pease Sue Paradis, Gina Turrigiano, Paul Miller  May 10   11 am   Volen 201
Solon Schur John Lisman, Eve Marder, Paul Miller May 6    10 am   Volen 201
Alexander Trott Leslie Griffith, Piali Sengupa, Melissa Kosinski-Collins May 6    11 am   Volen 201
Dylan Wolman Sue Paradis, Sacha Nelson, Piali Sengupta May 10   1 pm    Volen 201

Faculty research mentor (emphasized) is chair of the committee.

How actin networks assemble in cells

A new review article in Current Opinion in Cell Biology by Molecular and Cell Biology grad student Melissa Chesarone and Biology’s Professor Bruce Goode focuses on a group of remarkable protein machines that rapidly assemble actin polymers in cells. These factors are essential for cell division, cell movement, and cell shape determination in virtually all organisms. Their catalytic mechanisms involve intricate fast-moving parts, which enables them to construct entire actin networks in a matter of seconds.

Actin "pointers" for EM labeling

Single particle electron microscopy reconstruction can be a powerful tool for determining the structure of large protein complexes. One limitation of the technique is the difficulty in coming up with specific labels for the protein that can be visualized with EM. In a new paper in RNA, postdoc Beth Stroupe and coworkers show that the use of the actin-nucleating protein Spire as a cloneable tag allows them to nucleate actin filaments that then “point” to the location of the tag in the complex seen in EM, and applied the technique to their studies of the C complex spliceosome.

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