Clocks, fruit flies, and Sweden

We mentioned previously that Rosbash, Hall and Young are getting the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine this year “for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm”.

The Physiology/Medicine lectures were on Thursday Dec 7 at 1 pm CET (7 am Brandeis time) and are still available to view. The Biology Department enjoyed watching the lectures on “tape delay”:

From and about the winners, via Cell:

About the science and its implications:

If you need to flesh out your fantasy of going to Sweden to collect your prize, see What to expect when you’re expecting a Nobel Prize


Circadian Rhythms and When to Eat (Swedish Television)


Rosbash, Hall & Young Awarded Nobel Prize

Michael Rosbash, Nobel Laureate

Brandeis researchers Michael Rosbash, the Peter Gruber Endowed Chair in Neuroscience, and Professor Emeritus of Biology Jeffrey C. Hall have received this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, together with Michael Young from The Rockefeller University,  for their pioneering work on the molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythm.

More about Michael

More about Jeff

More about Drosophila


Hall, Rosbash and Young Share Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine

The 10th annual Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine has been awarded jointly to Michael Rosbash and Jeffrey Hall of Brandeis and Michael Young of Rockefeller University. The trio are once again being honored for their discovery of molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms. Hall is Emeritus Professor of Biology at Brandeis, and Rosbash is Peter Gruber Endowed Chair in Neuroscience, Professor of Biology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator.

The Shaw Prize, established under the auspices of Mr Run Run Shaw, honours individuals, regardless of race, nationality, gender and religious belief, who have achieved significant breakthrough in academic and scientific research or applications and whose work has resulted in a positive and profound impact on mankind. There are three annual prizes: Astronomy, Life Science and Medicine, and Mathematical Sciences, each bearing a monetary award of one million US dollars. The presentation ceremony is scheduled for Monday, 23 September 2013.

Update: There a couple of really nice videos on YouTube from the Pearl Report (TVB in Hong Kong) that discuss the science and the history behind this prize.

Hall, Rosbash, and Young share Wiley Prize

menetfig1The 12th annual Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences has been awarded jointly to Michael Rosbash and Jeffrey Hall of Brandeis and Michael Young of Rockefeller University. The trio are once again being honored for their work on the molecular mechanisms governing circadian rhythms (see more on this site)

Massry Prize for Hall, Rosbash, and Young

Brandeis scientists Michael Rosbash and Jeff Hall, along with Michael Young (Rockefeller Univ.) will receive the 2012 Massry Prize, according to Brandeis NOW. The prize, established in 1996 by the Meira and Shaul G. Massry Foundation,   honors “outstanding contributions to the biomedical sciences and the advancement of health“. This trio of researchers has garnered several prizes already for their contributions to understanding the mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms.

The winners will receive the prize and present lectures on October 29, 2012 at the University of Southern California.

There will be a couple of opportunities to hear Michael Rosbash talk about circadian rhythms locally, first at the Inaugural Lecture for the Gruber chair on Thursday, then at the Brandeis Café Science fall season opener on October 1.


Rosbash, Hall, and Young Honored with Canada Gairdner International Award

Brandeis science faculty members Michael Rosbash and Jeff Hall were named today as 2012 recipients of the Canada Gairdner International Award, one of the world’s top prizes for biomedical research. Together with Michael Young (Rockefeller Univ.), they were honored “for pioneering discoveries concerning the biological clock responsible for circadian rhythms”. The trio has previously been honored with the 2011 Louis Gross Horwitz Prize and the 2009 Gruber Neuroscience Prize for this research.

The Gairdner Foundation in Toronto began giving awards in 1959 to recognize and reward the world’s most creative and accomplished biomedical scientists. So far about a quarter of the recipients have gone on to win a Nobel Prize. Also honored this year (for other work) were neuroscientist Tom Jessell and immunologist Jeffrey Ravetch.

Hall is now Professor Emeritus of Biology, and his influence is felt strongly in the strong Drosophila genetics community at Brandeis even though his lab is gone. The Rosbash lab continues to be a force for innovation in research on circadian regulation and mRNA processing. To hear more about Rosbash lab research, come to Wednesday seminar on April 4, when Michael will be the speaker. The title of his seminar is: 37 years at Brandeis (but who’s counting): Gene Expression and Circadian Rhythms.

Here’s some video the Gairdner Foundation posted on YouTube:

More information about this story at the following sites:

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