7 Division of Science Faculty Recently Promoted

Congratulations to the following 7 Division of Science faculty members were recently promoted:

katz_dbDonald B. Katz (Psychology) has been promoted to Professor of Psychology. Don came to Brandeis as an Assistant Professor with a joint appointment in the Volen Center for Complex Systems in 2002 and was promoted to Associate Professor and awarded tenure in 2008. Don’s teaching and research serve central roles in both Psychology and the Neuroscience program. His systems approach to investigating gustation blends behavioral testing of awake rodents with multi-neuronal recording and pharmacological, optogenetic, and modelling techniques. Broad themes of the neural dynamics of perceptual coding, learning, social learning, decision making, and insight run through his work on gustation. For his research, Don has won the 2007 Polak Award and the 2004 Ajinomoto Young Investigator in Gustation Award, both from the Association for Chemoreception Sciences. Don has taught “Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience” (NPSY11b), “Advanced Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience” (NPSY197a), “Neuroscience Proseminar” (NBIO250a), “Proseminar in Brain, Body, and Behavior II” (PSYC302a), “How Do We Know What We Know?” (SYS1c). For his excellence in teaching, Don has been recognized with the 2013 Jeanette Lerman-Neubauer ’69 and Joseph Neubauer Prize for Excellence in Teaching and Mentoring, the 2006 Brandeis Student Union Teaching Award, and the 2006 Michael L. Walzer Award for Teaching and Scholarship.

Nicolas RohlederNicolas Rohleder (Psychology) has been promoted to Associate Professor in Psychology. Nic is a member of the Volen Center for Complex Systems and on the faculty of the Neuroscience and Health, Science, Society and Policy programs. His course offerings include “Health Psychology” (PSYC38a), “Stress, Physiology and Health” (NPSY141a), and” Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology” (PSYC52a). Nic’s research investigates how acute and chronic or repeated stress experiences affect human health across individuals and age groups. His laboratory performs studies with human participants using methods than span behavioral to molecular to understand how the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulate peripheral immunological responses and how these processes mediate cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and aging. His research and teaching fill unique niches for all his Brandeis departmental and program affiliations. Nic’s research excellence has been recognized outside Brandeis with awards including the 2013 Herbert Weiner Early Career Award of the American Psychosomatic Society and the 2011 Curt P. Richter Award of the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology.

Matthew HeadrickMatthew Headrick (Physics) has been promoted to Associate Professor of Physics. He works at the intersection of three areas of modern theoretical physics: quantum field theory, general relativity, and quantum information theory. In particular, he uses information-theoretic techniques to study the structure of entanglement — a fundamental and ubiquitous property of quantum systems — in various kinds of field theories. Much of his work is devoted to the study of so-called “holographic” field theories, which are equivalent, in a subtle and still mysterious way, to theories of gravity in higher-dimensional spacetimes. Holographic theories have revealed a deep connection between entanglement and spacetime geometry, and Headrick has made significant contributions to the elucidation of this connection. Understanding the role of entanglement in holographic theories, and in quantum gravity more generally, may eventually lead to an understanding of the microscopic origin of space and time themselves.

Isaac Krauss

Isaac Krauss (Chemistry) has been promoted to Associate Professor of Chemistry. He is an organic chemist and chemical biologist whose research is at the interface of carbohydrate chemistry and biology. His lab has devised tools for directed evolution of modified DNA and peptides as an approach to designing carbohydrate vaccines against HIV. Krauss is also a very popular teacher and the recipient of the 2015 Walzer prize in teaching for tenure-track faculty.

Xiaodong Liu (Psychology) has been promoted to Associate Professor in Psychology. Xiaodong provides statistical training for graduate students in Psychology, Heller School, IBS, Neuroscience, Biology, and Computer Science, he serves as a statistical consultant for Xiaodong LiuPsychology faculty and student projects, and he performs research on general & generalized linear modeling and longitudinal data analysis, which he applies to child development, including psychological adjustment and school performance. He teaches “Advanced Psychological Statistics I and II” (PSYC210a,b), “SAS Applications” (PSYC140a), “Multivariate Statistics I: Applied Structural Equation Modeling” (PSYC215a), and “Multivariate Statistics II: Applied Hierarchical Linear Models” (PSYC216a). He is developing a new course on “The R Statistical Package and Applied Bayes Analysis”, and he recently won a Provost’s Innovations in Teaching Grant for “Incorporating Project-based modules in Learning and Teaching of Applied Statistics”.

Gabriella SciollaGabriella Sciolla (Physics) has been promoted to Professor of Physics. She is a particle physicist working on the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. Sciolla and her group study the properties of the newly discovered Higgs Boson and search for Dark Matter particles produced in high-energy proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Sciolla is also responsible for the reconstruction and calibration of the muons produced in ATLAS. These particles are key to both Higgs studies and searches for New Physics.

Nianwen Xue (Computer Science) has been promoted to Associate Professor of Computer Science.  The Computer Science Department is pleased to annNianwen Xueounce the promotion of Nianwen (Bert) Xue to Associate Professor with tenure. Since joining Computer Science he has made significant contributions to the research and teaching efforts in Computational Linguistics, including growing a masters program from zero up to 18 students this year. His publications are very well regarded, and focus on the development and use of large corpora for natural language processing, especially in Chinese. He has built a sizable lab with diverse funding that students from around the world are vying to enter.

Thank you to the following department chairs for their contributions to this post:

  • Paul DiZio, Psychology
  • Jane Kondev, Physics
  • Jordan Pollack, Computer Science
  • Barry Snider, Chemistry

Isaac Krauss Wins the Michael L. Walzer ’56 Award for Teaching

Isaac Krauss

Isaac Krauss

Isaac Krauss, Associate Professor of Chemistry, has won the 2015 Michael L. Walzer ’56 Award for Teaching. This award is given every year to a tenure track faculty member who “combines superlative scholarship with inspired teaching.”

Isaac teaches “Organic Chemistry” for undergraduates and “Advanced Organic Chemistry: Synthesis I and II” at the graduate level. His departmental service includes participation in the Chemistry department’s graduate admissions and graduate studies committee, colloquium committee and curriculum committee. His interactions with students include advising first years and majors; supervising students in his lab; serving on senior thesis and dissertation committees, and organizing a Chamber Music Brunch and playing chamber music with undergraduates on campus.

A few comments from student nominators include:

“Isaac cares about every single one of his students. Not only does he excel at teaching large lecture classes, he is a fantastic mentor to students.

“He makes sure to know every students name in a class of 200.”

Isaac is the recipient of the 15th Annual Strage Award for Aspiring Young Science Faculty, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the 2012 Thieme Chemistry Journal Award. His expertise is in the field of chemical glycobiology, and he and his lab are researching possible HIV vaccines, using directed evolution of modified DNA and petides to create antigenic mimics of the virus.

He is a graduate of Stanford University and earned his MA, MPhil, and PhD degrees from Columbia University. Isaac joined the Brandeis faculty in 2008, He has received grants from NIH and NSF, and his articles have been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and the Journal of Organic Chemistry, with his work highlighted in Chemical & Engineering News  and reviewed in Nature Chemical Biology and Current Opinion in Chemical Biology.

 

Isaac Krauss Wins 15th Annual Strage Award

Dr. Isaac Krauss, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, will be awarded the 15th Annual Alberta Gotthardt and Henry Strage Award for Aspiring Young Science Faculty on Wednesday, April 15 in Gerstenzang 123 at 2:00 PM.

In his annIsaac Kraussouncement, John F. Wardle, Chair of the Strage Award Selection Committee, said “Isaac has been recognized as one of the up and coming scientists in the field of chemical glycobiology. His work on carbohydrate recognition and direct evolution has been highlighted in Chemical & Engineering News and Faculty of 1000 Prime, and reviewed in Nature Chemical Biology and Current Opinion in Chemical Biology.

Dr. Krauss has also received the 2013 National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the 2012 Thieme Chemistry Journal Award.

Learn more about Dr. Krauss’ research

Who is Selma?

A new paper in Angewandte Chemie International Edition from a Brandeis group led by postdoc Iain MacPherson, Professor of Biology Liz Hedstrom and Assistant Professor of Chemistry Isaac Krauss introduces a new technique they dub SELMA, short for “selection with modified aptamers”. Currently available selection methods can identify the few oligonucleotides in a library of 107 random DNAs or RNAs that bind specifically to a target protein (these specific binders are termed aptamers). However, nucleic acids have a very limited repertoire of chemical functionality — SELMA expands this functionality by introducing an alkyne-modified nucleotide that can be coupled to virtually any azide-containing compound using a copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction (“click chemistry“).

The Brandeis group used SELMA to create a library of sugar-modified oligonucleotides and selected for glycoclusters that mimic the epitope of 2G12, an antibody that protects against HIV infection by binding to a cluster of high-mannose glycans on the HIV envelope protein gp120. This is the first example of the application of directed evolution to protein-carbohydrate interactions, a particularly difficult class of interactions to mimic with traditional synthetic methods. Protein carbohydrate interactions are involved in wide array of biological processes, including cell-cell signaling, cell migration and developmental programming as well as immune recognition, so this method should prove very useful.

MacPherson, I. S., Temme, J. S., Habeshian, S., Felczak, K., Pankiewicz, K., Hedstrom, L. and Krauss, I. J. (2011), Multivalent Glycocluster Design through Directed Evolution. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 50: 11238–11242. doi: 10.1002/anie.201105555

 

An alternative to scuba diving

Many promising medicinal agents (anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal) have been discovered among the diverse molecules produced by marine organisms. However, scuba-diving to harvest sponges and algae is not usually a practical way of obtaining usable quantities of these compounds, especially if they are present only in trace quantities in the source organisms.

A recently published paper in Organic Letters from the laboratory of Assistant Professor of Chemistry Isaac Krauss is the first to present a synthetic laboratory approach to the preparation of the bromophycolides, originally isolated from Callophycus Serratus, a red algae which was collected off the coast of Fiji. Although these compounds were shown to posses anti-tumour, anti-HIV and anti-malarial properties, algae collected in a second expedition to Fiji apparently contained none of the natural product (hence the desirability of a laboratory synthesis). The bromophycolides are a structurally unique family of natural products containing brominated asymmetric carbon centers and large 19-membered rings. This paper illustrates the preparation of the bromophycolide A and D ring system in high enantiomeric purity via a short (9-step) synthetic sequence.

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