Math Receives Gift for Berger-Leighton Endowed Professorship

Bonnie Berger

The entire Mathematics Department at Brandeis feels grateful and deeply honored by the recent gift by Bonnie Berger ’83, a former Brandeis trustee and the Simons Professor of Mathematics at MIT, and her husband, Dr. Tom Leighton, Professor of Applied Mathematics at MIT and CEO and cofounder of Akamai Technologies. This gift is very timely for the Mathematics department, as they are experiencing a generational transition, and look to attract a new generation of scholars that will help shape the direction and reputation of the department for the next decades.

The Brandeis Mathematics Department has an illustrious history, and many prominent mathematicians have flourished at Brandeis. The Berger-Leighton Endowed Professorship will be a crucial tool to renew this tradition of excellence. They will aim at hiring new faculty of the highest caliber, which will serve as anchors for future research groups within the department and beyond.

Brandeis prides itself in having a faculty body that both radiates internationally and takes good care of its students internally. The Mathematics department is a prime example of this aspiration, and they are excited that the Berger-Leighton Endowed Professorship will help them achieve this vision. The first recipient of the Endowed Professorship will be hired this year. The department has an abundance of exceptional candidates. They are looking forward to welcoming a new colleague soon, and helping them bloom and become an influential mathematician.

Additional information: Brandeis Alumni, Friends and Families

Maurice Auslander Distinguished Lectures & International Conference to be held 10/26-10/30

Maurice AuslanderThe Mathematics Department of Northeastern University is organizing the 2022 Maurice Auslander Distinguished Lectures and International Conference which will take place at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. The Maurice Auslander Distinguished Lectures is going to be held from October 29-30. The International Conference runs October 26-30.

The conference series honors the legacy of the renowned late mathematician Maurice Auslander whose research in the areas of representation theory, commutative algebra and category theory has had a tremendous impact on mathematics. The conference series is one of the premier events in Algebra, gathering a large number of prominent researchers and early career mathematicians, including many minority and female mathematicians. It is supported by the COS and Math Department of Northeastern, the NSF and the Mathematics Department of Brandeis University. The Distinguished Lectures are supported by the contributions of Bernice Auslander.

Registration fee is $100. To register: contact Kiyoshi Igusa (igusa@brandeis.edu).

Virtual Conference: Climate & Math to be held 5/26/22

As part of the Brandeis’ Year of Climate ActionThomas Fai, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Jonathan Touboul, Associate Professor or Mathematics (with Denis Patterson from Princeton University) have organized a Climate and Math Conference for Thursday, May 26th (10:00 AM to 5:00 PM). This will be a virtual one-day conference offered as part of the Brandeis Mathematical Biology Seminar.

This conference will bring together leading researchers in mathematical modeling related to climate change. It will cover techniques from mathematical modeling, data analysis and climate policy, and topics including impact of climate change on vegetation, animal populations, water/ice, carbon, and human health.

This virtual conference is part of the Brandeis Year of Climate Action program that will be occurring throughout 2022 and 2023. The Office of Sustainability is responsible for this program.

 

Dmitry Kleinbock is awarded a Simons Fellowship in Mathematics

Dmitry KleinbockProfessor of Mathematics Dmitry Kleinbock has been awarded a prestigious Simons Fellowship in Mathematics, which will support research activities during his sabbatical leave in the fall of 2022.

Kleinbock’s research deals with dynamical systems of algebraic origin and their applications to number theory. A dynamical system is simply a set of points together with an evolution law that governs the way points move over time. It turns out that many mathematical problems concerning integer solutions of some equations or inequalities can be understood in terms of the behavior of certain dynamical systems. Furthermore, systems that arise in this context are of algebraic nature (so called flows on homogeneous spaces of Lie groups), which makes it possible to use a wide variety of sophisticated tools such as representation theory, hyperbolic geometry and geometry of lattices.

During the Spring 2022 semester Kleinbock is visiting the Institute for Mathematical Research at ETH (Zürich, Switzerland), giving a lecture course on the topic of dynamics on homogeneous spaces. The plan for the spring is to finish several projects and start new collaborations. Then in the Fall 2022 semester Kleinbock will be a member of a thematic program on Applications of Dynamics in Number Theory and Algebraic Geometry at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, NJ, led by Tamar Ziegler (Hebrew University, Jerusalem). This will be an excellent opportunity, thanks to the Simons Fellowship, to explore further connections between dynamics and number theory.

Anish Ghosh receives the 2021 Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize

Anish Ghosh has received the 2021 Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize in Mathematical Sciences. The Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize is India’s highest science award within the country. While at Brandeis, Anish Ghosh was the student of Dmitry Kleinbock, Professor of Mathematics. He is currently a faculty member at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai where he specializes in Ergodic Theory and Number Theory.

Kleinbock wrote the following about his former student:

“It was a great pleasure to find out that Anish Ghosh, my former student here at Brandeis, has received the Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar prize. Anish is a talented mathematician working in the field of ergodic theory on homogeneous spaces. Interest in this field rose significantly during the late 1980s and early 1990s after the seminal achievements of Marina Ratner and Anish’s mathematical grandfather Gregory Margulis, whose work, in particular the proof of the Oppenheim Conjecture, has since served as a basis for numerous links between dynamics and number theory.”

“Anish has been exploring connections between the two fields throughout his mathematical career. Since his graduation in 2006 he has authored more than 40 papers, many published in top-level journals, and has become one of a few people who are shaping the subject of ergodic theory and its arithmetical applications. Among his notable achievements I can mention the work on distribution of dense lattice orbits in homogeneous spaces, on intrinsic Diophantine approximation, on applications of equidistribution to counting lattice points and – most recently – an approach to quantitative Oppenheim-type problems involving Rogers’ moment formulas.”

“Anish has also been a great mentor, who as of now has produced at least 8 PhD students and collaborated with them extensively on various problems. He has lectured extensively on the subject of connections of dynamics and number theory and edited several collections of papers. To summarize, the Bhatnagar Prize is well deserved, and I am positive that the mathematical talent of Anish Ghosh will continue to flourish.”

New Undergraduate Engineering Science Program Approved

Technology is central to our society. Universities play a key role as innovation hubs in new technology development, by linking knowledge creation, workforce development and commerce. After a multi-year planning process with Brandeis stakeholders and Engineering education experts, the Brandeis Faculty and Board of Trustees has approved the creation of a distinctively Brandeisian undergraduate Engineering Science program, designed for ABET accreditation. Unlike other models in which Engineers are siloed in their own department or school, this interdepartmental program is designed to  maximize horizontal integration across and beyond the Sciences.  All hands are now on deck to make this program a reality.  Institutional Advancement is working closely with faculty to raise the funds necessary to meet our ambitious goals.

Science Engineering LogoTo build up this program, we will  capitalize on the existing synergy between the life and physical sciences, while enhancing core research areas with an emphasis on translating basic research to technological applications.  Our goal is to integrate the engineering curriculum with the social justice mission that is integral to Brandeis. We envision providing opportunities for our students and faculty to deeply engage in science, design, and problem-solving while participating in a curriculum and culture that grapples with issues of social justice, business ethics and sustainability. The curriculum will be designed with these aspirations by engaging faculty from all of arts and sciences, IBS and Heller.  Ultimately, we hope that this new program will give our students the tools to intervene in the world and challenge them to build a better one.

We welcome input from our friends and alums as we begin to engage in the task of building up this exciting new program.

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