Shantanu Jadhav Wins Sloan Research Fellowship

Shantanu Jadhav

Shantanu Jadhav, assistant professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and one of our newest faculty members, has won the prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Jadhav’s research focuses on how the hippocamus and the prefrontal cortex interact and communicate with each other.  This activity influences the brain’s ability to learn, remember and make decisions.

More information about Shantanu Jadhav’s research and the Sloan Research Fellowship can be found at Brandeis NOW.

 

 

SPROUT grant opportunity for 2015 announced

From the Brandeis Office of Technology Licensing:

The Brandeis Virtual Incubator invites members of the Brandeis Community (faculty, staff and students) to submit an application for the SPROUT Program. These Awards are intended to stimulate entrepreneurship on campus and help researchers launch their ideas and inventions from the lab to the marketplace.The SPROUT Program will provide pilot funding for innovative scientific projects within the Division of Science that require bench research, lab space, and/or lab equipment.

We will be awarding $50,000 to be shared among the most promising proposals.
Come get your questions answered at one of our upcoming information sessions.
Info Sessions: 
Thursday, February 26,  11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. (Volen, room 201)
Monday, March 2,  2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.   (Shapiro Science Center, 1st Floor Library, room 1-03)
 
Deadlines: Preliminary Proposals are due by Friday, March 6th
Please note, the introduction of the new SPARK Program geared towards innovative non-bench projects that have impact. An additional email will be sent detailing this program.
For more information on each program go to our website or contact the OTL program leaders,  Melissa Blackman for SPROUT and  Anu Ahuja  for SPARK.

Sleep and memory are connected by a pair of neurons in Drosophila

In a recent post on the Fly on the Wall blog, Neuroscience grad student Bethany Christmann talks about recently published research from Leslie Griffith’s lab:

 … [How are sleep and behavior] connected in the brain? Does sleep simply permit memory storage to take place, such that the part of the brain involved in memory just takes advantage of sleep whenever it can? Or are sleep and memory physically connected, and the same mechanism in the brain is involved in both? In a recent study published in eLife, researchers in the Griffith lab may have [uncovered the answer]. They found that a single pair of neurons, known as the DPM neurons, are actively involved in both sleep and memory storage in fruit flies.

Haynes PR, Christmann BL, Griffith LC. A single pair of neurons links sleep to memory consolidation in Drosophila melanogaster. eLife. 2015;4.

Eve Marder Receives SfN Award

marderEve Marder, PhD, from Brandeis University and Richard Olivo, PhD, from Smith College will receive the Award for Education in Neuroscience from the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). The award will be presented at Neuroscience 2014, SfN’s annual meeting to be held on November 15-19 in Washington, DC.

The $5,000 prize will be split between Drs. Marder and Olivo. It recognizes people who have made outstanding contributions to neuroscience education and training. Dr. Marder played a critical role in the establishment of one of the first undergraduate neuroscience training programs at Brandeis almost 25 years ago. Since then, she has continued to provide advice and support at all academic levels.

Read the SfN press release to learn more about this prestigious award.

 

Odor Recognition & Brute-Force Conversions

Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience will be publishing an interesting paper written by Honi Sanders and John Lisman (with co-authors Brian E. Kolterman, Roman Shusterman, Dmitry Rinberg, Alexei Koulakov) titled, “A network that performs brute-force conversion of a temporal sequence to a spatial pattern: relevance to odor recognition“. Honi Sanders has written a preview of this paper.

by Honi Sanders

Lisman_ProvisionalPDF_BLThere are many occasions in which the brain needs to process information that is provided in a sequence. These sequences may be externally generated or internally generated. For example, in the case of understanding speech, where words that come later may affect the meaning of words that come earlier, the brain must somehow store the sentence it is receiving long enough to process the sentence as a whole. On the other hand, sequences of information also are passed from one brain area to another.  In these cases too the brain must store the sequence it is receiving long enough to process the message as a whole.

One such sequence is generated by the olfactory bulb, which is the second stage of processing of the sense of smell.  While individual cells in the olfactory bulb will fire bursts in response to many odors, the order in which they fire is specific to an individual odor. How such a sequence can be recognized as a specific odor remains unclear.  In Sanders et al, we present experimental evidence that the sequence is discrete and therefore contains a relatively small number of sequential elements; each element is represented in a given cycle of the gamma frequency oscillations that occur during a sniff. This raises the possibility of a “brute force” solution for converting the sequence into a spatial pattern of the sort that could be recognized by standard “attractor” neural networks.  We present computer simulations of model networks that have modules; each model can produce a persistent snapshot of what occurs during a given gamma cycle. In this way, the unique properties of the sequence can be determined at the end of sniff by the spatial pattern of cell firing in all modules.

The authors thank Brandeis University High Performance Computing Cluster for cluster time. This work was supported by the NSF Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience, NSF IGERT, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Gina Turrigiano Named One of the “30 Most Influential Neuroscientists Alive Today”

Gina Tturrigiano405urrigiano has been named one of the “30 Most Influential Neuroscientists Alive Today” by the Online Psychology Degree Guide.

The guidelines for selecting the neuroscientists include: leadership, applicability (neuroscientists that have created technologies that have improved people’s lives); awards & recognition by the international science community and other notable accomplishments such as personal or educational achievements.

Gina Turrigiano is the author of numerous papers, has been awarded a MacArthur Foundation fellowship and the HFSP Nakasone Award, and in 2013 was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

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