Jadhav receives NARSAD Young Investigator Grant

Assistant Professor of Psychology Shantanu Jadhav has recently been named to receive a 2015 NARSAD Young Invesigator Grant from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. The $70,000 award will help allow the Jadhav lab to

investigate the physiological interactions between the brain’s hippocampal and prefrontal cortex regions that support learning and memory-guided behavior. The two structures are important for different aspects of memory formation, storage, and retrieval, and impaired hippocampal-prefrontal interactions have been implicated in neurological disorders related to cognition, including memory disorders and schizophrenia.

7 Division of Science Faculty Recently Promoted

Congratulations to the following 7 Division of Science faculty members were recently promoted:

katz_dbDonald B. Katz (Psychology) has been promoted to Professor of Psychology. Don came to Brandeis as an Assistant Professor with a joint appointment in the Volen Center for Complex Systems in 2002 and was promoted to Associate Professor and awarded tenure in 2008. Don’s teaching and research serve central roles in both Psychology and the Neuroscience program. His systems approach to investigating gustation blends behavioral testing of awake rodents with multi-neuronal recording and pharmacological, optogenetic, and modelling techniques. Broad themes of the neural dynamics of perceptual coding, learning, social learning, decision making, and insight run through his work on gustation. For his research, Don has won the 2007 Polak Award and the 2004 Ajinomoto Young Investigator in Gustation Award, both from the Association for Chemoreception Sciences. Don has taught “Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience” (NPSY11b), “Advanced Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience” (NPSY197a), “Neuroscience Proseminar” (NBIO250a), “Proseminar in Brain, Body, and Behavior II” (PSYC302a), “How Do We Know What We Know?” (SYS1c). For his excellence in teaching, Don has been recognized with the 2013 Jeanette Lerman-Neubauer ’69 and Joseph Neubauer Prize for Excellence in Teaching and Mentoring, the 2006 Brandeis Student Union Teaching Award, and the 2006 Michael L. Walzer Award for Teaching and Scholarship.

Nicolas RohlederNicolas Rohleder (Psychology) has been promoted to Associate Professor in Psychology. Nic is a member of the Volen Center for Complex Systems and on the faculty of the Neuroscience and Health, Science, Society and Policy programs. His course offerings include “Health Psychology” (PSYC38a), “Stress, Physiology and Health” (NPSY141a), and” Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology” (PSYC52a). Nic’s research investigates how acute and chronic or repeated stress experiences affect human health across individuals and age groups. His laboratory performs studies with human participants using methods than span behavioral to molecular to understand how the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulate peripheral immunological responses and how these processes mediate cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and aging. His research and teaching fill unique niches for all his Brandeis departmental and program affiliations. Nic’s research excellence has been recognized outside Brandeis with awards including the 2013 Herbert Weiner Early Career Award of the American Psychosomatic Society and the 2011 Curt P. Richter Award of the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology.

Matthew HeadrickMatthew Headrick (Physics) has been promoted to Associate Professor of Physics. He works at the intersection of three areas of modern theoretical physics: quantum field theory, general relativity, and quantum information theory. In particular, he uses information-theoretic techniques to study the structure of entanglement — a fundamental and ubiquitous property of quantum systems — in various kinds of field theories. Much of his work is devoted to the study of so-called “holographic” field theories, which are equivalent, in a subtle and still mysterious way, to theories of gravity in higher-dimensional spacetimes. Holographic theories have revealed a deep connection between entanglement and spacetime geometry, and Headrick has made significant contributions to the elucidation of this connection. Understanding the role of entanglement in holographic theories, and in quantum gravity more generally, may eventually lead to an understanding of the microscopic origin of space and time themselves.

Isaac Krauss

Isaac Krauss (Chemistry) has been promoted to Associate Professor of Chemistry. He is an organic chemist and chemical biologist whose research is at the interface of carbohydrate chemistry and biology. His lab has devised tools for directed evolution of modified DNA and peptides as an approach to designing carbohydrate vaccines against HIV. Krauss is also a very popular teacher and the recipient of the 2015 Walzer prize in teaching for tenure-track faculty.

Xiaodong Liu (Psychology) has been promoted to Associate Professor in Psychology. Xiaodong provides statistical training for graduate students in Psychology, Heller School, IBS, Neuroscience, Biology, and Computer Science, he serves as a statistical consultant for Xiaodong LiuPsychology faculty and student projects, and he performs research on general & generalized linear modeling and longitudinal data analysis, which he applies to child development, including psychological adjustment and school performance. He teaches “Advanced Psychological Statistics I and II” (PSYC210a,b), “SAS Applications” (PSYC140a), “Multivariate Statistics I: Applied Structural Equation Modeling” (PSYC215a), and “Multivariate Statistics II: Applied Hierarchical Linear Models” (PSYC216a). He is developing a new course on “The R Statistical Package and Applied Bayes Analysis”, and he recently won a Provost’s Innovations in Teaching Grant for “Incorporating Project-based modules in Learning and Teaching of Applied Statistics”.

Gabriella SciollaGabriella Sciolla (Physics) has been promoted to Professor of Physics. She is a particle physicist working on the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. Sciolla and her group study the properties of the newly discovered Higgs Boson and search for Dark Matter particles produced in high-energy proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Sciolla is also responsible for the reconstruction and calibration of the muons produced in ATLAS. These particles are key to both Higgs studies and searches for New Physics.

Nianwen Xue (Computer Science) has been promoted to Associate Professor of Computer Science.  The Computer Science Department is pleased to annNianwen Xueounce the promotion of Nianwen (Bert) Xue to Associate Professor with tenure. Since joining Computer Science he has made significant contributions to the research and teaching efforts in Computational Linguistics, including growing a masters program from zero up to 18 students this year. His publications are very well regarded, and focus on the development and use of large corpora for natural language processing, especially in Chinese. He has built a sizable lab with diverse funding that students from around the world are vying to enter.

Thank you to the following department chairs for their contributions to this post:

  • Paul DiZio, Psychology
  • Jane Kondev, Physics
  • Jordan Pollack, Computer Science
  • Barry Snider, Chemistry

Shantanu Jadhav Wins Sloan Research Fellowship

Shantanu Jadhav

Shantanu Jadhav, assistant professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and one of our newest faculty members, has won the prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Jadhav’s research focuses on how the hippocamus and the prefrontal cortex interact and communicate with each other.  This activity influences the brain’s ability to learn, remember and make decisions.

More information about Shantanu Jadhav’s research and the Sloan Research Fellowship can be found at Brandeis NOW.

 

 

Institutional Betrayal: The case of Campus Sexual Assault

freyd1Please join us and The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program for a special lecture:

Institutional Betrayal: The case of Campus Sexual Assault

Presented by Prof. Jennifer Freyd
University of Oregon
Department of Psychology

Friday, September 12, 2:00 PM
Sachar International Center, Wasserman Cinematheque

Co-sponsored by The Department of Psychology, The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, The Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Prof. Ray Knight

John Wardle Named Division of Science Head

John Wardle, Division of ScienceSusan Birren, Dean of Arts and Sciences, has announced that John Wardle, Professor of Physics, will be the new Head of the Division of Science.

The following is Susan’s email:

“I am pleased to announce that John Wardle will be the new Head of the Division of Science.  John is an astrophysicist and Professor of Physics and is a former chair of the Physics department.  In his new role he will oversee science-wide programs and initiatives, including the summer undergraduate research program and will work with Division of Science faculty and staff to identify new directions for the division.  I am delighted that he has agreed to take on this role and I hope that you will join with me in welcoming him.

We all owe a debt of gratitude to Eve Marder who, as the first Head of the Division, created and steered many of the priorities of the Division.  During her time as Head, Eve ably represented the Sciences at Brandeis and beyond, worked to make the Summer Undergraduate Science Program a flourishing success, changed the way we trained students and postdocs in the ethical conduct of research, and worked tirelessly to secure funding and recognition for the Sciences.  Thank you Eve!”

Men, Women and Emotional Stress Responses

Psychoneuroendocrinology (November 2014) is publishing a fascinating paper authored by Sarah Lupis, Michelle Lerman and Jutta Wolf titled Anger responses to psychosocial stress predict heart rate and cortisol stress responses in men but not women.

473People can experience a wide range of emotions when under stress, including feelings of anger and fear. In recent years researchers have sought to understand how these emotion stress responses are linked to biological stress responses. In particular, some evidence suggests that anger and fear may be linked to cardiovascular changes in differential ways. It is less clear, however, how emotions during stress may predict increases in levels of the stress hormone cortisol. These deficits in our understanding are partly due to the methodological difficulties in measuring emotion in the context of stress. Much prior research has relied solely on retrospective self-report (after the stress has passed, a questionnaire asks a study participant to reflect on how he felt in the moment of stress). By this time, the participant may have forgotten how he felt, or may already be utilizing coping strategies to process those emotions. In addition, he may not feel comfortable reporting how the stressor made him feel, leading to less-than-honest responses. Unsurprisingly, prior research has not shown consistent links between these self-report measures and biological stress responses. In the current study, we therefore added facial coding of emotion expression to assess emotions occurring during stress. Our aim was to determine how expressions of anger and fear were linked to heart rate and cortisol stress responses.

We recruited 32 healthy Brandeis students and exposed them to a brief psychosocial stressor. A certified coder assessed facial expressions shown during the stressful situation. Heart rate and cortisol levels were measured throughout. After the stressor, the participants also self-reported how they felt during the stressor. A first notable finding showed that what participants self-reported feeling and the expressions they actually showed did not correlate. With regards to self-report, men who reported feeling fear showed blunted cortisol stress responses. Consistent with prior research, self-report was otherwise not associated with heart rate or cortisol stress responses. When looking at facial expressions, a consistent pattern appeared: men who showed more anger during the stressful situation also showed exaggerated heart rate and cortisol stress responses. For women, neither anger nor fear were linked to biological stress responses (see Figure).

Our findings first emphasize the importance of assessing emotion using multiple means. In this case, facial expressions revealed an emotion-stress link for males that would not be apparent using self-report alone. Facial coding may thus be a useful addition to current stress paradigms. Further, if men who react with anger in stressful situations do respond with exaggerated stress responses, it could have important down-stream health effects. Exaggerated, prolonged, or dysfunctional stress responses could, over time, lead to changes in basal stress systems. This kind of ‘allostatic load’ is associated with negative health outcomes including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Anger and fear do not seem to drive these responses in females, and further study is needed to determine if similar relationships exist for a different set of emotions, perhaps self-conscious emotions like shame. By better understanding these relationships, more healthful ways of coping with stress can be developed, which is particularly important given that for many, stress has become an unavoidable part of daily life.

 

Art Wingfield Festschrift – “Age, Hearing, and Speech Comprehension”

Brandeis_072214_004b

On July 22nd, 70 colleagues, friends, and students gathered for a festschrift in honor of Art Wingfield, the Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience. The theme of the day was Age, Hearing, and Speech Comprehension, reflecting Art’s research interests.

Brandeis_072214_064In addition to a scientific program composed of talks centered on this topic, the day also featured former students, collaborators, and colleagues sharing stories about Art. These included Stefanie Kuchinsky (2003) who completed a senior honors project in Art’s lab, former postdoc Marianne Fallon, former students Cindy Lahar and Sarah Wayland, and colleagues from the Department of Psychology (Jim Lackner and Paul Dizio).

The day ended with the surprise announcement of the establishment of an annual travel award in Art’s name that will support a graduate student in psychology or neuroscience to travel to a scientific conference, and dinner in town. A great time was had by all!

More information, photos, and stories can be found at www.artwingfieldfest.com.

Brandeis_072214_082
Images: Heratch Photography

“Age, Hearing, and Speech Comprehension”: A Festschrift for Art Wingfield

artWingfieldBlogA one-day event will be held on July 22, 2014 at the Shapiro Campus Center Theater to honor Art Wingfield, the Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience, for his 40+ years of research and teaching at Brandeis. During his time at Brandeis, Art has made contributions to the areas of speech comprehension, cognitive aging, memory, and aphasia and has mentored numerous PhD students, research assistants and postdocs. Art has inspired countless other students in his course on Human Neuropsychology.

Some of the speakers will include former lab members and prominent researchers in the field:

  • Mark Eckert, Department of Otolaryngology,
    Medical University of South Carolina
  • Murray Grossman, Department of Neurology,
    University of Pennsylvania
  • Stefanie Kuchinsky, Center for Advanced Study of Language,
    University of Maryland
  • Jonathan Peelle, Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Kathy Pichora-Fuller, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga
  • Robert Remez , Department of Psychology, Columbia University
  • Bruce Schneider, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga
  • Liz Stine-Morrow, Department of Educational Psychology and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

For more information about this event can be found at www.artwingfieldfest.com/.

If you are interested in attending, please register at by July 5th.

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