Institutional Betrayal: The case of Campus Sexual Assault

freyd1Please join us and The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program for a special lecture:

Institutional Betrayal: The case of Campus Sexual Assault

Presented by Prof. Jennifer Freyd
University of Oregon
Department of Psychology

Friday, September 12, 2:00 PM
Sachar International Center, Wasserman Cinematheque

Co-sponsored by The Department of Psychology, The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, The Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Prof. Ray Knight

John Wardle Named Division of Science Head

John Wardle, Division of ScienceSusan Birren, Dean of Arts and Sciences, has announced that John Wardle, Professor of Physics, will be the new Head of the Division of Science.

The following is Susan’s email:

“I am pleased to announce that John Wardle will be the new Head of the Division of Science.  John is an astrophysicist and Professor of Physics and is a former chair of the Physics department.  In his new role he will oversee science-wide programs and initiatives, including the summer undergraduate research program and will work with Division of Science faculty and staff to identify new directions for the division.  I am delighted that he has agreed to take on this role and I hope that you will join with me in welcoming him.

We all owe a debt of gratitude to Eve Marder who, as the first Head of the Division, created and steered many of the priorities of the Division.  During her time as Head, Eve ably represented the Sciences at Brandeis and beyond, worked to make the Summer Undergraduate Science Program a flourishing success, changed the way we trained students and postdocs in the ethical conduct of research, and worked tirelessly to secure funding and recognition for the Sciences.  Thank you Eve!”

Men, Women and Emotional Stress Responses

Psychoneuroendocrinology (November 2014) is publishing a fascinating paper authored by Sarah Lupis, Michelle Lerman and Jutta Wolf titled Anger responses to psychosocial stress predict heart rate and cortisol stress responses in men but not women.

473People can experience a wide range of emotions when under stress, including feelings of anger and fear. In recent years researchers have sought to understand how these emotion stress responses are linked to biological stress responses. In particular, some evidence suggests that anger and fear may be linked to cardiovascular changes in differential ways. It is less clear, however, how emotions during stress may predict increases in levels of the stress hormone cortisol. These deficits in our understanding are partly due to the methodological difficulties in measuring emotion in the context of stress. Much prior research has relied solely on retrospective self-report (after the stress has passed, a questionnaire asks a study participant to reflect on how he felt in the moment of stress). By this time, the participant may have forgotten how he felt, or may already be utilizing coping strategies to process those emotions. In addition, he may not feel comfortable reporting how the stressor made him feel, leading to less-than-honest responses. Unsurprisingly, prior research has not shown consistent links between these self-report measures and biological stress responses. In the current study, we therefore added facial coding of emotion expression to assess emotions occurring during stress. Our aim was to determine how expressions of anger and fear were linked to heart rate and cortisol stress responses.

We recruited 32 healthy Brandeis students and exposed them to a brief psychosocial stressor. A certified coder assessed facial expressions shown during the stressful situation. Heart rate and cortisol levels were measured throughout. After the stressor, the participants also self-reported how they felt during the stressor. A first notable finding showed that what participants self-reported feeling and the expressions they actually showed did not correlate. With regards to self-report, men who reported feeling fear showed blunted cortisol stress responses. Consistent with prior research, self-report was otherwise not associated with heart rate or cortisol stress responses. When looking at facial expressions, a consistent pattern appeared: men who showed more anger during the stressful situation also showed exaggerated heart rate and cortisol stress responses. For women, neither anger nor fear were linked to biological stress responses (see Figure).

Our findings first emphasize the importance of assessing emotion using multiple means. In this case, facial expressions revealed an emotion-stress link for males that would not be apparent using self-report alone. Facial coding may thus be a useful addition to current stress paradigms. Further, if men who react with anger in stressful situations do respond with exaggerated stress responses, it could have important down-stream health effects. Exaggerated, prolonged, or dysfunctional stress responses could, over time, lead to changes in basal stress systems. This kind of ‘allostatic load’ is associated with negative health outcomes including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Anger and fear do not seem to drive these responses in females, and further study is needed to determine if similar relationships exist for a different set of emotions, perhaps self-conscious emotions like shame. By better understanding these relationships, more healthful ways of coping with stress can be developed, which is particularly important given that for many, stress has become an unavoidable part of daily life.

 

Art Wingfield Festschrift – “Age, Hearing, and Speech Comprehension”

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On July 22nd, 70 colleagues, friends, and students gathered for a festschrift in honor of Art Wingfield, the Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience. The theme of the day was Age, Hearing, and Speech Comprehension, reflecting Art’s research interests.

Brandeis_072214_064In addition to a scientific program composed of talks centered on this topic, the day also featured former students, collaborators, and colleagues sharing stories about Art. These included Stefanie Kuchinsky (2003) who completed a senior honors project in Art’s lab, former postdoc Marianne Fallon, former students Cindy Lahar and Sarah Wayland, and colleagues from the Department of Psychology (Jim Lackner and Paul Dizio).

The day ended with the surprise announcement of the establishment of an annual travel award in Art’s name that will support a graduate student in psychology or neuroscience to travel to a scientific conference, and dinner in town. A great time was had by all!

More information, photos, and stories can be found at www.artwingfieldfest.com.

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Images: Heratch Photography

“Age, Hearing, and Speech Comprehension”: A Festschrift for Art Wingfield

artWingfieldBlogA one-day event will be held on July 22, 2014 at the Shapiro Campus Center Theater to honor Art Wingfield, the Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience, for his 40+ years of research and teaching at Brandeis. During his time at Brandeis, Art has made contributions to the areas of speech comprehension, cognitive aging, memory, and aphasia and has mentored numerous PhD students, research assistants and postdocs. Art has inspired countless other students in his course on Human Neuropsychology.

Some of the speakers will include former lab members and prominent researchers in the field:

  • Mark Eckert, Department of Otolaryngology,
    Medical University of South Carolina
  • Murray Grossman, Department of Neurology,
    University of Pennsylvania
  • Stefanie Kuchinsky, Center for Advanced Study of Language,
    University of Maryland
  • Jonathan Peelle, Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Kathy Pichora-Fuller, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga
  • Robert Remez , Department of Psychology, Columbia University
  • Bruce Schneider, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga
  • Liz Stine-Morrow, Department of Educational Psychology and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

For more information about this event can be found at www.artwingfieldfest.com/.

If you are interested in attending, please register at by July 5th.

Can Self-Referencing Contribute to Memory Errors?

A recent paper in the Journal of Gerontology by Brandeis Ph.D. program alumnus Dr. Nicole Rosa and Professor Angela Gutchess attempts to answer this question. During an interview with ElderBranch, Dr. Nicole Rosa discusses the relationship between self-referencing and false memory. For more information, please read the article on ElderBranch.

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