Leslie Griffith Receives SASTRA-Obaid Siddiqi Award

SASTRA award

Model depicts how the integration of light, ambient temperature, the circadian clock and homeostatic sleep drive sets the balance between daytime and nighttime sleep [Parisky, K.M., Agosto Rivera, J.L., Donelson, N.C., Kotecha, S. and Griffith, L.C. (2016) “Reorganization of sleep by temperature in Drosophila requires light, the homeostat and the circadian clock” Curr Biol 26:882-892]

Leslie C. Griffith, Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Volen National Center for Complex Systems, has received the SASTRA–Obaid Siddiqi Award for excellence in life sciences. The prize is given by the Shanmugha Arts, Science, Technology & Research Academy (SASTRA) University in Thanjavur, India. Siddiqi was a pioneering molecular biologist and founder of the Molecular Biology Unit of the Tata Institute for Fundamental Research.

Griffith’s interests range from the biochemistry of neuronal signal transduction, in particular the role of CaMKII in memory formation, to the hierarchical relationships between complex behaviors such as sleep and learning. She has contributed to our understanding of these issues using genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster and believes that model systems have an important place in pioneering the understanding of basic biological processes. Her lab has been active in developing tools that allow interrogation of molecular and cellular processes with temporal and spatial resolution in freely behaving animals to bridge the molecule-behavior gap.

Griffith received the award on February 28, 2017.

Genetics Training Grant Symposium to be held Sep 2

The Genetics Training Grant at Brandeis (GTG) is an important part of the graduate programs in Molecular & Cell Biology and Biochemistry & Biophysics, teaching students to critically evaluate both their own research and the scientific literature, while also developing their communication skills. The annual symposium, organized and hosted by the GTG students, is central to this mission. This year’s GTG Symposium is entitled “Signal Transduction: Insights gained from diverse species”, and will take place on September 2.  Four distinguished scientists will be presenting their recent work:

  • Gary Ruvkun (Harvard Medical School), our Keynote Speaker, will speak about neuroendocrine control of C. elegans development, metabolism and longevity;
  • Marcia Haigis (Harvard Medical School) will present her work on mitochondrial sirtuins and aging;
  • Morris White (Children’s Hospital Boston) will talk about the molecular basis of mammalian insulin-like signaling in the pathophysiology of metabolic disease;
  • Cynthia Bradham (Boston University) will present work on secondary axis specification and patterning in the sea urchin.

These talks will be followed by a Poster Session and Reception (see schedule). Current and former GTG trainees will be presenting posters from 3:40 to 5:00 PM in the Shapiro Science Center Atrium, All life sciences graduate students are encouraged to present posters.

The entire event is free and open to the public.  For planning purposes, we ask anyone attending the symposium and/or presenting a poster to pre-register by August 24th, 2011. Poster titles will be available after registration is complete.

Please join us for this exciting symposium showcasing genetics at Brandeis.

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