Rachel Woodruff Promoted to Assistant Professor

Rachel WoodruffRachel Woodruff has been promoted to Assistant Professor of Biology. Rachel joined the Brandeis faculty almost three years ago as an Instructor in Biology. During this time, Rachel has taught several Biology courses for undergraduate and Master’s students and recently guided Biology students as an Undergraduate Advising Head.

James Morris, Associate Professor, recently detailed Rachel’s importance to the Brandeis community:

“Rachel teaches courses for biology majors and non-majors. She regularly teaches Biology 14a-Genetics and Genomics, which is part of the introductory biology sequence. This course is taken by many first and second-year students. In addition, she teaches upper-level courses focusing on DNA damage and repair, as well as cancer, drawing on her research experience on DNA damage in bacteria and yeast. These classes include Biology 150b DNA Research and Mechanisms and Biology 172b Growth Control and Cancer. These seminar-style classes include opportunities to read and interpret scientific papers. She also teaches Biology 101b Molecular Biotechnology for advanced undergraduate and Master’s students, introducing students to techniques in molecular biology and teaching students to write their own research proposals. Finally, she teaches BISC 9b Biology of Cancer for non-majors, introducing this important topic to students in an accessible and engaging way.”

 

Summer 2015: “Introduction to Microfluidics Technology”

Students are in the cleanroom during training.

Students in the clean room during training

The annual one-week course offered during the summer of 2015 is “Introduction to Microfluidics Technology” (June 22 – 26). It will be held at Brandeis University and sponsored by the National Science Foundation’s Bioinspired Soft Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) at Brandeis. It is intended for graduate students, post docs, faculty and industrial scientists and engineers interested in utilizing microfluidic technology in their work, in both physical sciences and life sciences, and does not assume any specific prerequisites.

SUMMER COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT 2015

Microfluidic Xmas Tree

JBS Course Focuses on “Food, Lifestyle, and Health”

Elaine Lai, Senior Lecturer in Biology at Brandeis University, will be teaching a Justice Brandeis Semester (JBS) this summer titled Food, Lifestyle, and Health. The class runs from 6/1/2015 to 7/24/2015. The student receives 12 credits upon successful completion of the course. Food, Lifestyle, and Health will provide an immersive academic experience by combining academic training in the classroom with experiential learning in food labs.

The focus of this course will be to explore the link between food and health, specifically focusing on the factors that have lead to our national diabetes epidemic. Some of the issues studied will be the link between poverty and diabetes and diabetes and other chronic health conditions.

Applications for the Justice Brandeis Semester open on February 13, 2015. The application deadline is March 16, 2015.

James Morris Contributes Article to Boston Globe Magazine

The January 4, 2015 edition of the Boston Globe Magazine included a contribution from James Morris, associate professor of biology at Brandeis. The article titled, Raising kids is like making candy. Magical transformations occur in both processes.

In the article, Jim drew comparisons between the chemical processes involved in making candy and the complex process of raising children. The article provides a fun, insightful view of both topics.

Eve Marder Receives SfN Award

marderEve Marder, PhD, from Brandeis University and Richard Olivo, PhD, from Smith College will receive the Award for Education in Neuroscience from the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). The award will be presented at Neuroscience 2014, SfN’s annual meeting to be held on November 15-19 in Washington, DC.

The $5,000 prize will be split between Drs. Marder and Olivo. It recognizes people who have made outstanding contributions to neuroscience education and training. Dr. Marder played a critical role in the establishment of one of the first undergraduate neuroscience training programs at Brandeis almost 25 years ago. Since then, she has continued to provide advice and support at all academic levels.

Read the SfN press release to learn more about this prestigious award.

 

How Life Works

how life worksAssociate Professor of Biology James Morris, together with several faculty members from Harvard, has recently written a new textbook, titled Biology: How Life Works, a book that seems likely to become a standard for teaching introductory biology to college students.

According to Morris,

“The last 20 years or so have seen remarkable and exciting changes in biology, education, and technology.  With these in mind, we re-thought what an introductory biology textbook could be.  Introductory biology is a student’s first exposure to college-level biology.  We wrote a book that provides a solid base on which to build and treats biology not as a list of terms and facts to be memorized, but instead as a 21st century science that is compelling and relevant to students’ lives..”

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