Behind the Scenes @ Brandeis: The Masks We Wear

April 13th, 2015

Behind the Scenes @ Brandeis: The Masks We Wear

Thursday, April 23 9am-9pm in the Farber Mezzanine

Reception 6:30-8:30 pm

SOC 128b: Documenting Race, Class, and Gender will present an interactive photo exhibit on Thursday, April 23 in the Farber Mezzanine. The exhibit will be open from 9am-9pm with a reception from 6:30-8:30 pm. Led by Professor Powers, the students from SOC 128b document their personal experiences at Brandeis through photo essays in order to examine intersections of race, class, and gender. This event is sponsored by the Sociology Department and the International Center for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life.

The Outrageous Sophie Tucker

April 3rd, 2015

Saturday, May 2, 2:00 p.m. at the Museum of Fine Art

Professor Joyce Antler, author of A History of The Jewish Mother, is a guest speaker for The National Center for Jewish Film’s 18th Annual Film Festival, which runs from April 30-May 15. Purchase tickets and find out more at!

“American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street”

March 5th, 2015

American Pulp

A talk by Paula Rabinowitz at University of Minnesota

March 5th at 4:00 p.m. Mandel Atrium

Paula Rabinowitz ’74 is a professor in the Department of English at the University of Minnesota. Her new book, “American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street,” tells the story of the midcentury golden age of pulp paperbacks and how they brought modernism to Main Street, democratized literature and ideas, spurred social mobility and helped readers fashion new identities. Drawing on extensive original research, Paula unearths the far-reaching political, social and aesthetic impact of the pulps between the late 1930s and early 1960s.

How New England could become Farmville again

November 25th, 2014


In an article in the Boston Globe, Professor Brian Donahue discusses his “elaborate report laying out a scenario in which New England, in the year 2060, has three times as much farmland as it does now—a full 6 million acres, or 15 percent of the entire landmass, upon which to raise crops and livestock that would be consumed by the local population. Under these conditions, the authors of the report argue, New England could grow 50 percent of its own food.” Read more at the Boston Globe.

Doherty Presents Hollywood and Hitler: The back story, at Drew University, Nov. 13

November 12th, 2014

hollywood and hitler by thomas doherty

In the last years of the 20th century, Hollywood was big on causes.

But in the 1930s, American cinema was virtually silent on one of history’s most urgent moral issues: The rising persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany.

This silence was especially curious because the era’s most powerful movie moguls were Jews, who themselves had fled Russian pogroms a generation earlier.

Presenting at the daylong conference, Hollywood and Nazi Germany, 1933-1945, Stories Told/Stories Untold, Professor Doherty, author of Hollywood and Hitler, 1933-1939, will delve deeper into this complex story with a panel of experts at Drew University in Madison on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014.

Read more about the conference and Professor Doherty’s talk here.

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