Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care

Study Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care this summer!

The environments where we live, learn, work, play, and pray shape our day-to-day lives and long-term health and well-being in complex ways. Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at the California Endowment, famously said “tell me your zip code and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.”

This course lays a theoretical and empirical foundation for those interested in understanding how social factors (poverty, community context, work environments, etc.) affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States. You will develop tools to analyze epidemiological patterns of health status by race/ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. In addition, you will learn how structural factors (racism, segregation, gender hierarchies, dominant cultural norms within health systems and organizations, and their intersections) contribute to health disparities, and how policies and practices inside and outside of the healthcare system are advancing health equity.

This Summer School course addresses the following inequity concerns and how they relate to health:

  • In New Orleans, the life expectancy of residents from the poorest zip code in the city is 26 years lower than for residents of the wealthiest zip code.
  • The median net worth for Black Bostonians is $8.00 compared to White median net worth of $247,500.00.
  • In 2015, women working full-time earned 80% of what men working full-time earned, and if trends continue, white women will have to wait until 2056 to see equal work for equal pay.
  • Hispanic women will have to wait 232 years for the pay gap to close without active policy intervention.

If you are interested in understanding how these social and structural factors affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States, then register for this summer’s Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care course.

Session 2 of Brandeis Summer School starts July 6!
Online courses are filling very quickly this summer so be sure to register soon!

 

Course Details:

HSSP 114B: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care

With Jessica Santos, Ph.D. – view biography here.

Summer Session 2: July 6 to August 7, 2020

Online: Mondays, Tuesday, and Thursdays

Time: 8:30am – 11:00am

Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS

View the Full Syllabus here.

 

Questions?

Email us at summerschool@brandeis.edu

Staying Sane During Quarantine

These past weeks have proved to be trying times for the global community. The transition to an online world has left many scrambling for a sense of normalcy. Many find themselves worried about the safety of their loved ones, especially if they are in the high-risk category. Others are trying to maintain their regular study and work schedule during a pandemic. So, how do we keep our sanity during this unprecedented global lockdown?

Brandeis University student and GPS blog writer, Angela Self, compiled a list of some helpful tips to stay sane during quarantine:

1. Stick to a routine

Being stuck inside can make the days blend together and amplify negative emotions. Creating a sense of structure during these uncertain times can help to soothe nerves. Take some time out of your day to figure out all of the activities that were important to you before the global pandemic. Did you go to the gym everyday? Try to workout at home (there are plenty of free workouts on youtube). Create a detailed schedule and stick to it. Be sure to include  when to wake up, shower, work, exercise, and most importantly, when you can relax. Hopefully this will help to create some semblance of normalcy.

2. Limit your news intake

It is important to keep up-to-date with information regarding the Coronavirus, especially when it concerns regulations or guidelines for public interactions in your area. But obsessing over the latest Coronavirus news can be  unhealthy and detrimental to your mental health. Consider limiting your news intake to just one or two times a day. Also, remember to check the reliability of your news source. One of the best sources of information about the Coronavirus is the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Another great resource for mental health coping strategies during these unprecedented times is NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness), which we encourage everyone to read. 

3.Stay physically active

WHO, otherwise known as the World Health Organization, strongly recommends that everyone finds a way to stay physically active during self-quarantine. It’s important to our health and well-being to avoid remaining sedentary. Try taking a few breaks during your day to go on short walks, even if it’s just around your house. And get outside if you can! Just remember that if you plan on exercising outside, to do so by abiding by the CDC guidelines.

Become absorbed in James Joyce’s Ulysses this summer!

David R. Sherman, Associate Professor of English at Brandeis, will lead a course on Joyce’s Ulysses this summer.

Session I: June 1 to July 3, 2020
Days: M, T, W, Th
Time: 11:10am – 1:10pm
Credit Hours: 4 Credits
Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: WI, HUM

This seminar is an opportunity to become absorbed in Joyce’s Ulysses as a member of an interpretive community. Published in 1922, this novel has impacted modern literature like no other. A novel at the edge of the genre of the novel, Ulysses is a highly experimental, weirdly delightful, and encyclopedic world-making project.

This class will explore the novel chapter by chapter, with parallel readings of Homer and other intertexts. This course will also consider the place of Ulysses in modernism: the explosive cultural project across the arts in the early 20th century that is still with us.

As a four-credit course, it is based on the expectation that students will work for at least three hours outside of class for every class contact hour (doing assigned readings, research, papers and projects, and so on). The learning goals for this course include:

  • developing the ability to closely read and re-read complex texts and to make nuanced
    descriptions of their stylistic patterns, structural principles, rhetorical techniques and
    other aspects of their aesthetic force and signifying effects;
  • developing skills with analytic and interpretive writing, through feedback and revision
    researching and presenting information about scholarly debates around Ulysses
    mapping Ulysses in relation to other modernist cultural movements;
  • designing creative or non-academic responses to Ulysses, in various media and genres

Our intensive, collaborative approach to Ulysses will serve different needs for each student, based on individual academic and creative commitments – view the full course syllabus here

Summer registration in Sage is open and some classes are already full – so be sure to enroll soon!

We are fully online this summer!

To ensure everyone’s health and safety, all Summer School sessions are now online for summer 2020.

Based on the expectation that social distancing will continue throughout the summer, the Brandeis Summer School will now offer all of the 5-week courses in Undergraduate Summer Session 1 and Session 2 via “remote learning.” As in past years, we will also offer a number (now greatly expanded) of 10-week asynchronous online classes.

What is the difference between 5-week Session 1 and Session 2 courses, and 10-week Session O?
  • Session 1 (June 1 – July 3, 2020) and Session 2 (July 6 – August 7, 2020) will offer five-week courses via “remote learning,” through which you’ll engage with instructors and classmates by utilizing Zoom for synchronous meetings, as well as LATTE.

 

  • Session O (June 1 – August 9, 2020) will also offer a number of 10-week asynchronous online classes. As in past years, Session O courses at Brandeis are generally presented asynchronously using a common structured calendar of readings, assignments, and interactions with classmates. You do not need to be online in front of your computer at set days and times each week. Instead, you’ll have shared course deadlines for completing the readings, watching and creating videos, submitting assignments, critiquing peer work, posting original and thoughtful contributions to online discussion forums, and replying to classmates.
What skills do I need to succeed in an online course?
  • Strong reading and writing skills: our courses rely on written material, recorded video, and podcasts. In addition to weekly readings, course content may include weekly online “lecture notes,” supplemental readings, articles, case studies, and discussions. You’ll participate in the course through regular, written assignments, discussion posts, and project work.

 

  • Effective time-management skills: using the syllabus, weekly checklists, and an online calendar and assignments tool, you’ll follow the course schedule and meet weekly assignment expectations. Expect to spend 18-22 hours per week in a 10-week course, and 36-44 hours per week in a 5-week course (including the live “remote learning” class meetings).

 

  • Comfort with the technology: you’ll learn to use online learning technology effectively. All online summer courses are based within the Brandeis LATTE system, the University’s online learning environment. Remote learning courses will utilize Zoom. Many courses will also use other online tools, like the creation of videos, sharing of files, development of Google Slides, Sheets, and Docs, as well as specialized programs developed for the subject matter.
What courses are being offered in the 10-week session online, and in the 5-week sessions?

Visit our course listings page. Then, to find the 10-week asynchronous online classes, use the “Choose which sessions to display” filter at the top of the page to select “Session 0” (Online) to view just the courses that will be offered 10-week asynchronous online.  The 5-week “remote learning” courses will be listed as Session 1 or Session 2, along with the dates and times of the online class meetings.

Registration will open soon!

The schedule and offering of summer are subject to change, and with the announcement that all classes will be online, a few courses have changed sessions, dates, and times. So be sure to review the Summer School course offerings and check your Sage account to confirm that you don’t have any holds that could prevent you from registering.

Sign up or visit our website to get the most up-to-date information about summer classes!

Coronavirus/COVID-19 Update

In response to Coronavirus/COVID-19, Brandeis has moved all classes online. Summer School staff are currently working remotely but holding regular office hours.

At present, we anticipate that summer courses and programs will run as scheduled on campus, but this may change based on public health updates. Should this change, we will notify you immediately. Please sign up for the Summer School email list to receive news, updates, and notifications.

We are aware that this is a stressful time for everyone and we are here to assist in any way that we can. Learn what steps Brandeis is taking to protect our community.

Listed below are the steps that the CDC recommends to take in order to protect both yourself and others during this global pandemic:

1.  Clean your hands often

2.  Avoid close contact with others

3. Stay home if you are sick

4. Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze

5. Wear a facemask if you are sick

6. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily

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