Tag Archives: biology

images

Introductory Biology 15b

BIOL 15b is one of the more basic biology courses that fulfills the science requirement. Often you’ll see non-science majors in the lecture hall alongside those newly embarking on a science concentration.  This class touches on many of the same concepts found in the AP Biology curriculum, which explains why the registrar recommends against taking this course if you have taken AP Bio.  Because there is a lot of material to cover, it is important that you remain focus throughout the session and try to absorb as much of it as possible.  If you are taking this course with the intention of enrolling in BIOL 22a/b in the future, this course will provide an excellent foundation for those future courses.  Be sure to save your notes and lectures, perhaps they will be useful in semesters to come!

Course Tuition: $2,236 plus a nonrefundable, once per summer $50 registration fee.
http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/courses/offerings.php?sessionid=0&programid=25#

New Summer Classes Added to Summer 2012!

3 new classes have been added to Summer 2012!

BIOL 172b – Growth Control and Cancer with Justin Dore
M, T, W, Th 9:00 – 10:50 AM
Summer Session I: May 29 to June 29, 2012
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
This course covers the fundamental rules of behavior of cells in multicellular organisms. We will examine cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern cell growth, and differentiation and survival in normal cells, as well as how this regulation is disrupted in cancer.

JOUR 89a – Contemporary Media: Internship and Analysis with Maura Jane Farrelly
Extended Summer Session: May 29 to August 3, 2012
Prerequisite: AMST 15a, 137b, or 138b
This course brings together students who are independently engaged in various media internships and provides an opportunity for them to exchange their experiences w

ith other students and to discuss and analyze related readings. Students will receive career guidance in the various communication fields and they will have an opportunity to practice job-hunting skills, such as resume and cover letter writing. Students who choose to satisfy the journalism minor’s internship option must take this course. Students should first contact Prof. Maura Jane Farrelly to discuss their proposed Internship, or for advice in finding an internship site.

HISP 104b – Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World with Jorge Arteta

M, T, Th 8:30 – 10:50 AM
Summer Session I: May 29 to June 29, 2012
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, fl
Prerequisite: 30-level Spanish course or equivalent.
This course offers an opportunity to expand the participants’ linguistic skills in Spanish while simultaneously deepening their understanding of Hispanic culture. The main theme of the course is the history and ideas that shape the Spanish-speaking world, from its peninsular origins to the realities of Spanish-speakers in the Americas, including the United States.

The following topics will be studied throughout the course:

  • Concepts of identity and culture
  • Religion and mythology in the course of history
  • Dynamics of nation formation
  • Hispanic peoples, ideas and languages in the USA

Pertinent vocabulary and complex grammar not mastered in previous courses will be studied, contextualized and applied during the course as appropriate. Please note that most of the study of grammar will be assigned to be done outside of class, as well as the course manual’s activities. Students will improve their listening skills, as well as develop new strategies to acquire new vocabulary and carry out the following functions in Spanish: narrating, describing, giving out advice and recommendations, comparing and contrasting, expressing opinions and providing valid arguments.

Registration is now open!

Check out all the summer course offerings at:

http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/courses/index.html

 

Brandeis Summer Students Studying on Campus

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Basic Guide to Courses for Brandeisians

We all know that the Brandeis students are of a completely different breed.  We can all relate to each other for one reason or another – that main reason being our Brandeisian pride.  Here is an unofficial guide to Brandeis courses:

INTERESTS:
First off, high school and college are extremely different. If you found that you did not particularly excel in something during your high school career, do not be turned off from this subject matter in college. Courses are taught differently and who knows, you may be avoiding a course that you would do really well in. It could be a potential major, minor, or career path to take after undergrad. It is also important to keep in mind that as much as your parents may want you to pursue an undergraduate degree in Art History, Biology, or Mathematics, this is your time to shine and find something that you are passionate in. If you choose a major or minor based off of what your parents want you could ultimately be stuck in a career that you do not enjoy.

SHOPPING PERIOD:
For those of you new to Brandeis, you may not fully understand the “Shopping Period” that we offer during the Fall and Spring semesters. The shopping period is self-explanatory, it is a two week period where you can try out different courses and see what you are most interested in or what fits your schedule best. No one wants to be stuck in a course that might drop his or her GPA. Also, why bother taking a course if you know that you won’t enjoy it and get all that you can out of it?

DON’T OVERWHELM YOURSELF:
Upon your arrival it may have appeared that every upperclassman had eight majors and sixteen minors. this is not the case! Some people are fortunate enough to have found different subject matters that interest them and they chose to pursue undergraduate degrees in those various subjects, but it is perfectly fine to only have one major. However, if you do find other courses that spark your interest, then take a few more classes in it. If you find that you can devote the time and energy into declaring a major or minor in it, then talk to your advisor and find out if he or she thinks it would be beneficial to you and your academic resumé.

BUILD A SPREADSHEET:
Organization is key. I have found that what helps me most is designing a spread sheet that clearly distinguishes each semester and the possible courses that are available and would fulfill my major, minor, and/or university requirements.  This way, you don’t find yourself in your eighth semester begging a professor to let you into a class before you didn’t realize that you forgot a major/minor/university requirement somewhere along the way.

DON’T BE AFRAID OF SUMMER SCHOOL:
Granted, in high school, Summer School seemed like a punishment for those who didn’t necessarily do as well as they could/should have in a particular course. In College, the concept of Summer School is completely different. In fact, it might be the students that are more proactive in their studies who enroll in summer courses. People enroll for a multitude of reasons. Maybe you have an internship in Waltham, Boston, or the surrounding area. Perhaps you want to double major and you wouldn’t normally have enough time to complete all of the requirements in your seven or eight semesters at Brandeis. These are just a few of the many reasons why students partake in the Summer Program here at Brandeis University.

Be sure to subscribe to this blog to hear about more Summer School updates as well as Brandeis updates.

technology and scientific researchchemical flask and a computer

Biology Curriculum Change

Attention Prospective Biology majors:

As many of you know, Biology is of one of the largest majors that is offered at Brandeis University.  The graduate school acceptance rates are so incredible that they attract “biophiliacs” from all over the world, literally.  Upon your arrival at Brandeis, you can immediately spot all of the Bio majors, usually by their heavy textbooks, 100 Carbonless Duplicate Paged Laboratory notebooks, and TI-80+ calculators.  These students came here for an understanding of fundamental and current biological knowledge in various areas, and nothing will stand in their way.

Some of you might be s little intimidated by the General Chemistry prerequisite, but fear not, Brandeis has adapted to the needs of its students and has provided alternatives!  Let’s just to take a few steps backwards, Biology is broken up into two sub sections, a bachelor’s degree of Arts and a bachelor’s degree of Science.  Both appear to require a year of General Chemistry before students decide to enroll in basic Biology courses.  Chemistry provides the foundation of Biology; however, if you have found that Chemistry is really not your forté, then read the following to learn how you can still get that degree in Biology:

1. Before you make any rash decisions, be sure to give Chemistry a chance during the shopping period.  It will definitely be helpful to sit in a Brandeis science class before embarking on more advanced courses.  If you seem to be leaning more towards dropping the course at the end of the shopping period, perhaps shop BIOL 15B Human Implications as well.

2.  If after the shopping period you feel that Chemistry is not for you, then talk to the professor and advisor to a second and third opinion.  The BIOL 15B course that was just mentioned is just one alternative for students that still want to pursue the Biology major.  It still satisfies the BIOL 22A/B prerequisite and you learn a lot on an introductory level.

3.  Perhaps you have taken AP Chemistry and/or AP Biology in high school, or a similar course, and you feel very confident in your science skills, then you should meet with your advisor and see what he or she thinks is the next best move for you.  Although the majority of students that enroll in BIOL 22A/B are sophomores, the course is open to exceptionally well-prepared first-year students.

After one has satisfied the core requirements for this major, students have the opportunity to pursue a specific field of interest or can continue to learn about the different biological courses and concepts that Brandeis has to offer.  In addition to the exceptional courses, these students also reserve the opportunity to participate in laboratory research and attend departmental colloquia.

Upon graduation, these Brandeis biology majors have many doors that open for them.  Depending on the courses that were taken and the individual’s interests, the student could pursue his or her graduate level education in dentistry, medicine, veterinary medicine, and allied health professions.  The student can also elect to join the work force as a biological researcher.   Others may choose to combine their other majors and/or minors to go in a completely different direction post-undergrad like law school, business, or education.  The possibilities are endless.  For more information, please visit the Biology University Bulletin.

IMPORTANT NOTE: For those interested in furthering their education in graduate studies of medicine, dentistry, and/or veterinary medicine, be sure to research their requirements or recommended requirements before you decide to not take General Chemistry.  Many of these schools strongly recommend some sort of chemistry background as it will be helpful in your future studies.

If you want to get a jumpstart on your Biology major requirements, be sure to keep an eye out for Summer 2012 Courses!

Summer Biology Instructor, Justin Dore, PhD

Biology Instructor and Scientist Lives and Teaches His Passion

Justin Dore is a remarkable bundle of energy. He earned his Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biology at Brandeis and his path to pursuing science is a great story.

Summer Biology Instructor, Justin Dore, PhDAfter being invited to observe his uncle’s participation in a long distance foot race, Justin was intrigued by the physiology of long-distance runners.  He leapt into the big time; training and entering triathlons. To ensure that his body was receiving the best fuel and conditioning possible, Justin began to study exercise physiology and nutrition on his own.  The intersection of biology, anatomy, biochemistry and human physiology continued to absorb his interest and led to pursuit of a Master of Science in Boulder, Colorado.  His research focus was comparative study of cardiac biochemistry in diabetic vs. nondiabetic populations.  Training in high altitude is what sets world-class runners apart and Justin used his time in Boulder to his advantage.

Degree completed, Justin returned to his native Massachusetts.  His research focus led him to work in the Diabetes Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. After several years at MGH, Justin decided to consolidate his interests and expand his knowledge by pursuing a Ph.D. here at Brandeis.

Through it all, he’s never slacked on training and running. For those of you who have checked out his biology courses on the Summer School website, you’ll note that they’ll begin a bit late.  Justin will be participating in the historic Comrades Marathon, an international ultramarathon of 90 kilometers, in Durban, South Africa.  He’s living his dream: teaching what he loves and applying that expertise in athletic competition.