Tag: courses (page 1 of 4)

Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care

Study Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care this summer!

The environments where we live, learn, work, play, and pray shape our day-to-day lives and long-term health and well-being in complex ways. Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at the California Endowment, famously said “tell me your zip code and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.”

This course lays a theoretical and empirical foundation for those interested in understanding how social factors (poverty, community context, work environments, etc.) affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States. You will develop tools to analyze epidemiological patterns of health status by race/ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. In addition, you will learn how structural factors (racism, segregation, gender hierarchies, dominant cultural norms within health systems and organizations, and their intersections) contribute to health disparities, and how policies and practices inside and outside of the healthcare system are advancing health equity.

This Summer School course addresses the following inequity concerns and how they relate to health:

  • In New Orleans, the life expectancy of residents from the poorest zip code in the city is 26 years lower than for residents of the wealthiest zip code.
  • The median net worth for Black Bostonians is $8.00 compared to White median net worth of $247,500.00.
  • In 2015, women working full-time earned 80% of what men working full-time earned, and if trends continue, white women will have to wait until 2056 to see equal work for equal pay.
  • Hispanic women will have to wait 232 years for the pay gap to close without active policy intervention.

If you are interested in understanding how these social and structural factors affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States, then register for this summer’s Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care course.

Session 2 of Brandeis Summer School starts July 6!
Online courses are filling very quickly this summer so be sure to register soon!

 

Course Details:

HSSP 114B: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care

With Jessica Santos, Ph.D. – view biography here.

Summer Session 2: July 6 to August 7, 2020

Online: Mondays, Tuesday, and Thursdays

Time: 8:30am – 11:00am

Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS

View the Full Syllabus here.

 

Questions?

Email us at summerschool@brandeis.edu

Pursue your Passion for the Arts this Summer!

Are you interested in exploring your creative side this summer? It is the perfect time to take a course in the arts with Brandeis Summer School!

Summer class options include:
FA 165A: Contemporary Art – ONLINE CLASS!

This course addresses art at the turn of the 20th century with attention to intersections of art and identity, politics, economy, and history. It will begin with discussions of art in the United States as New York City established itself as the capital of contemporary art and then move to consider art communities around the world that have become prominent as the art world, like politics and the economy, have become increasingly globalized.

ENG 21A: Young Adult Literature

Like myth, Young Adult literature brings us to the most elemental aspects of literary experience, and it does that in the most compelling and interesting way. It takes the experiences of young adults as seriously as they should be taken, and offers joy and consolation to its audience. In this course students will examine what is genuinely great about the work of Young Adult authors like J.K. Rowling, Suzanne Collins, Philip Pullman, and Lois Lowry. You’ll study how literature works, and in particular what makes narrative powerful.

ENG 79A: Screenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay

There’s never been a better time to become a screenwriter. Breakthroughs in technology, production, and distribution have heightened the demand for good scripts. Whether you want to write a micro-budget indie or a Hollywood blockbuster, this course provides all the essential tools you’ll need. Learn the fundamentals – structure, story arc, character development – and develop the first act of your feature screenplay. You’ll also watch and analyze recent movies. You’ll never look at a movie the same way again!

FA 3A: Introduction to Drawing I

Through a solid understanding of its form and principles, students will be encouraged to instigate intuitive and open responses to perceptual and conceptual sources. Students will address the role of drawing as part of their creative process.

FA 178B: Seminar on Chinese Calligraphy: History and Practice

This seminar examines the art and history of Chinese calligraphy. The goal is to introduce students of different Chinese-language levels (not limited to native-speakers) to canonical works of calligraphy as well as the enthusiasm and creativity these works have generated through the ages. From anonymous oracle bones and stone inscriptions to famed masterpieces, such as Wang Xizhi’s “Lanting Pavilion Preface,” and from original renderings to copies of others’ compositions, this course showcases the kaleidoscopic range that makes calligraphy a visual-linguistic art form beyond “words.” The multifaceted functions of stylized writing—such as for political, religious, and expressive purposes—will also be explored.

ENG 180A: The Modern American Short Story

Short stories bring you to the heart of narrative in a way that no other kind of literature does. Novels, plays, and movies have time to do world-building, and therefore they can give you a sense of what’s unique about their world. But short stories have to be far more direct, have to interact with readers in their own world. Over 5 weeks students will explore many of these worlds as they read and discuss several short stories every class!

THA 130A-1 & 2: Suzuki

Developed by the Japanese theater artist Tadashi Suzuki, the Suzuki method of acting training develops physical strength, stamina, and agility while engaging the imagination and will of the actor. Through a series of walks, statues, and marches, students are taught to breathe and move from the core of their bodies. This training allows students to act from physical impulse, resulting in a deep and personal experience of language and the world of play. This class also counts as one activity course toward the physical education requirement.

View all of the Summer Arts Courses and Syllabi Online.

Enroll today! Space is limited!

 

Questions? Email us at: summerschool@brandeis.edu

Thinking about a Economics major or minor? Start your study with ECON 10a this summer!

ECON 10A: Introduction to Microeconomics is intended for all possible economics majors, minors, and for all other students who plan to take Econ 20 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) later in their academic career. This is the first economics course that economics students should take at Brandeis, and anyone contemplating a major or minor should start with this course.

The course will give you an idea of the range of behaviors that economists investigate, introduce you to the basic tools that we use to analyze economic behavior, and apply these tools to public policy issues. Perhaps most important, this course will introduce you to the “economic way of thinking,” an approach to decision making that applies to personal decisions, to the decisions of businesses, labor unions and other organizations, and to the larger choices that society faces.

This course satisfies the School of Social Science (SS) distribution requirement and the Quantitative Reasoning (QR) component of the General University Requirements. It is also the first course for any student considering a concentration or minor in Economics.

This course has two “broad” goals. First, it is hoped that everyone will come out of this course a more educated citizen, being able to use basic economic principles to critically evaluate the arguments for and against public policy proposals (various tax proposals, immigration reform). Second, this course should give students the theoretical tools necessary for success in subsequent economics courses.

Learn more about registration for the Brandeis Summer School here.

Which Hogwarts’ house do you belong to?

Gryffindor, Slytherin, Ravenclaw or Hufflepuff? Discover your house loyalty this summer with William Flesch in his Young Adult Literature class (ENG 21A).

You will explore the purest form of story-telling and ponder what it means to be a person (human or otherwise). Since this is a summer class, the reading list is flexible and at the beginning of the course students and the instructor will brainstorm a set of readings together.

Book options may include:

  • Rowling: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  • Cooper: The Hunger Games
  • Stevenson: Kidnapped
  • Pullman: The Golden Compass
  • Lewis: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe
  • Valente: Space Opera
  • Lowry: The Giver

Interested in skipping straight to the heart of the narrative? Explore how very short fiction works in William Flesch’s Modern American Short Story class (ENG 180A).

You will be able to propose your preferred reading list and select which short stories you want to explore and examine further this summer. Past picks included writers as different as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Flannery O’Connor, Richard Wright, and Harry Turtledove.

William Flesch is a Professor of English at Brandeis and works on the “nature of literary experience, from Homer through present day movies, and on what an accurate description of literary experience can offer evolutionary psychologists and cognitive theorists.”  He has been cited by Newsweek as one of America’s “Great College Professors”: https://www.newsweek.com/four-great-college-professors-78703

Space for this summer is filling up quickly so reserve your spot today!

If you have any questions e-mail us at: summerschool@brandeis.edu.

———————————————————————————-

EXPLORE | EXPERIENCE | EXCEL

Remember to subscribe to our e-mail list to be notified of the latest class schedule updates and registration deadlines.

Registration for 2019 Summer School is now open!

The Brandeis University Summer School is excited to announce the opening of Summer 2019 registration in Sage.  Brandeis students can now enroll in summer classes for Summer Session 1 and 2 as well as the online session (Session 0).

We hope you will join us for a class this summer – on campus or online. We’re offering a variety of courses this year to help you fulfill degree requirements and explore new academic interests. Many students also use summer to focus on challenging courses like Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science, Psychology, or Economics. Some use summer term to work on a second or third major. Others use summer to lighten their course load in a future semester when they might be studying abroad or working at an internship.

Whatever your reason is, the Brandeis Summer School offers you the chance to study and connect with our talented faculty and fellow students in small classes – either on-campus or online!

About Summer School

The Brandeis Summer School is an open admission program and welcomes visiting students who regularly attend other colleges and universities. Visiting students can do not need to provide transcripts or proof that a course prerequisite has been satisfied (we trust that visiting students know best what they want and need for their academic progress). However, visiting students should check with their home institution (typically their Registrar’s Office) regarding the ability to transfer Brandeis courses back to your school. To assist you in obtaining this permission, we provide information on course levels and course numbering at Brandeis, as well as draft copies of our summer course syllabi.  One Brandeis semester course credit is equivalent to four units or four credit hours at other universities.

How To Register

For Brandeis students, registration for summer courses is very similar to registration in the Fall or Spring.  There are a few important differences which are summarized here:
http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/visiting-students/index.html

When registering, Brandeis students also need to start the registration process by telling Sage you want your student record active for summer. In the Sage Student Center page, Brandeis students will need to click “Summer School Term Activation” to activate their record for summer before enrolling. Please consult our helpful step-by-step guide to registering for summer in Sage if you need assistance.

2019 Summer Session Dates

  • Session I – June 3 to July 5, 2019
  • Session II – July 8 to August 9, 2019
  • Online Session – June 3 to August 11, 2019

Our full academic calendar can be found here:
http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/calendars/academic-calendar/index.html

Please note that if you wish to register for an online course, you will first need to complete a brief online orientation. To enroll in the online orientation, please email summerschool@brandeis.edu with the online courses you wish to take. Upon successful completion of the orientation, you will receive a Permission Number to enroll. If you wish to enroll in an upper-level Economics course, you will need to contact Leslie Yanich, the Economics Department administrator, at lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a consent code.

Learn More

Website: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/

Email: summerschool@brandeis.edu

We look forward to learning with you this summer!

———————————————————————————-

EXPLORE | EXPERIENCE | EXCEL

Remember to subscribe to our e-mail list to be notified of the latest class schedule updates and registration deadlines.

« Older posts

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)