Tag: summer school (page 1 of 6)

Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care

Study Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care this summer!

The environments where we live, learn, work, play, and pray shape our day-to-day lives and long-term health and well-being in complex ways. Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at the California Endowment, famously said “tell me your zip code and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.”

This course lays a theoretical and empirical foundation for those interested in understanding how social factors (poverty, community context, work environments, etc.) affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States. You will develop tools to analyze epidemiological patterns of health status by race/ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. In addition, you will learn how structural factors (racism, segregation, gender hierarchies, dominant cultural norms within health systems and organizations, and their intersections) contribute to health disparities, and how policies and practices inside and outside of the healthcare system are advancing health equity.

This Summer School course addresses the following inequity concerns and how they relate to health:

  • In New Orleans, the life expectancy of residents from the poorest zip code in the city is 26 years lower than for residents of the wealthiest zip code.
  • The median net worth for Black Bostonians is $8.00 compared to White median net worth of $247,500.00.
  • In 2015, women working full-time earned 80% of what men working full-time earned, and if trends continue, white women will have to wait until 2056 to see equal work for equal pay.
  • Hispanic women will have to wait 232 years for the pay gap to close without active policy intervention.

If you are interested in understanding how these social and structural factors affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States, then register for this summer’s Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care course.

Session 2 of Brandeis Summer School starts July 6!
Online courses are filling very quickly this summer so be sure to register soon!

 

Course Details:

HSSP 114B: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care

With Jessica Santos, Ph.D. – view biography here.

Summer Session 2: July 6 to August 7, 2020

Online: Mondays, Tuesday, and Thursdays

Time: 8:30am – 11:00am

Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS

View the Full Syllabus here.

 

Questions?

Email us at summerschool@brandeis.edu

Staying Sane During Quarantine

These past weeks have proved to be trying times for the global community. The transition to an online world has left many scrambling for a sense of normalcy. Many find themselves worried about the safety of their loved ones, especially if they are in the high-risk category. Others are trying to maintain their regular study and work schedule during a pandemic. So, how do we keep our sanity during this unprecedented global lockdown?

Brandeis University student and GPS blog writer, Angela Self, compiled a list of some helpful tips to stay sane during quarantine:

1. Stick to a routine

Being stuck inside can make the days blend together and amplify negative emotions. Creating a sense of structure during these uncertain times can help to soothe nerves. Take some time out of your day to figure out all of the activities that were important to you before the global pandemic. Did you go to the gym everyday? Try to workout at home (there are plenty of free workouts on youtube). Create a detailed schedule and stick to it. Be sure to include  when to wake up, shower, work, exercise, and most importantly, when you can relax. Hopefully this will help to create some semblance of normalcy.

2. Limit your news intake

It is important to keep up-to-date with information regarding the Coronavirus, especially when it concerns regulations or guidelines for public interactions in your area. But obsessing over the latest Coronavirus news can be  unhealthy and detrimental to your mental health. Consider limiting your news intake to just one or two times a day. Also, remember to check the reliability of your news source. One of the best sources of information about the Coronavirus is the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Another great resource for mental health coping strategies during these unprecedented times is NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness), which we encourage everyone to read. 

3.Stay physically active

WHO, otherwise known as the World Health Organization, strongly recommends that everyone finds a way to stay physically active during self-quarantine. It’s important to our health and well-being to avoid remaining sedentary. Try taking a few breaks during your day to go on short walks, even if it’s just around your house. And get outside if you can! Just remember that if you plan on exercising outside, to do so by abiding by the CDC guidelines.

Welcome Back!

It is the first day of classes here at Brandeis University and the campus is humming with excitement!

As the amazing summer comes to a close, the early signs of fall are already apparent. Daylight is beginning to soften, classrooms are filled with earnest students, and the evenings are crisp and cool in Waltham.

As you settle into your new class routines, we wish you the best with your studies this fall. If you encounter a course that you are unable to fit into your schedule, or if a required course is already closed, be sure to check back with us to see if we will offer it in Summer 2020!

Curious when classes will be announced, registration opens, or if new classes have been added? Join our email list so that you will be the first to know about any summer school updates!

If your summer plans take you away from Waltham, you can still earn Brandeis credits and continue your degree progress by taking an online summer course.  Online courses give you the flexibility to balance your summer work, travel, family commitments and social life. Learn more about online classes here.

If you have any questions about the upcoming summer, check out our website for more information or send us an email at summerschool@brandeis.edu. We are always happy to discuss any items of interest with you.

Enjoy the fall semester!

…and all at once, summer collapsed into fall.

Congratulations to all of our students for making another season of Brandeis Summer School a success!

Although we are looking forward to seeing the colorful fall leaves and indulging in pumpkin spice everything, we are sad to see the summer come to an end.

We could not have achieved so many academic accomplishments without the help of our talented group of Teaching Assistants, Program Assistants, and Activities Staff. We are very grateful for their hard work and dedication to every aspect of our summer classes.

Summer 2020 will arrive before we know it! Preparation for the upcoming season is already in progress – and we want to hear from you! Interested in taking a specific class? Improvements you’d like to suggest? Questions to ask? Email us at:  summerschool@brandeis.edu.

We are always happy to hear from our students.

We look forward to seeing you around campus and hope that you’ll join us again for a course or two next year!

In the meantime, best of luck with your studies and enjoy these last lazy days of summer.

Pursue your Passion for the Arts this Summer!

Are you interested in exploring your creative side this summer? It is the perfect time to take a course in the arts with Brandeis Summer School!

Summer class options include:
FA 165A: Contemporary Art – ONLINE CLASS!

This course addresses art at the turn of the 20th century with attention to intersections of art and identity, politics, economy, and history. It will begin with discussions of art in the United States as New York City established itself as the capital of contemporary art and then move to consider art communities around the world that have become prominent as the art world, like politics and the economy, have become increasingly globalized.

ENG 21A: Young Adult Literature

Like myth, Young Adult literature brings us to the most elemental aspects of literary experience, and it does that in the most compelling and interesting way. It takes the experiences of young adults as seriously as they should be taken, and offers joy and consolation to its audience. In this course students will examine what is genuinely great about the work of Young Adult authors like J.K. Rowling, Suzanne Collins, Philip Pullman, and Lois Lowry. You’ll study how literature works, and in particular what makes narrative powerful.

ENG 79A: Screenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay

There’s never been a better time to become a screenwriter. Breakthroughs in technology, production, and distribution have heightened the demand for good scripts. Whether you want to write a micro-budget indie or a Hollywood blockbuster, this course provides all the essential tools you’ll need. Learn the fundamentals – structure, story arc, character development – and develop the first act of your feature screenplay. You’ll also watch and analyze recent movies. You’ll never look at a movie the same way again!

FA 3A: Introduction to Drawing I

Through a solid understanding of its form and principles, students will be encouraged to instigate intuitive and open responses to perceptual and conceptual sources. Students will address the role of drawing as part of their creative process.

FA 178B: Seminar on Chinese Calligraphy: History and Practice

This seminar examines the art and history of Chinese calligraphy. The goal is to introduce students of different Chinese-language levels (not limited to native-speakers) to canonical works of calligraphy as well as the enthusiasm and creativity these works have generated through the ages. From anonymous oracle bones and stone inscriptions to famed masterpieces, such as Wang Xizhi’s “Lanting Pavilion Preface,” and from original renderings to copies of others’ compositions, this course showcases the kaleidoscopic range that makes calligraphy a visual-linguistic art form beyond “words.” The multifaceted functions of stylized writing—such as for political, religious, and expressive purposes—will also be explored.

ENG 180A: The Modern American Short Story

Short stories bring you to the heart of narrative in a way that no other kind of literature does. Novels, plays, and movies have time to do world-building, and therefore they can give you a sense of what’s unique about their world. But short stories have to be far more direct, have to interact with readers in their own world. Over 5 weeks students will explore many of these worlds as they read and discuss several short stories every class!

THA 130A-1 & 2: Suzuki

Developed by the Japanese theater artist Tadashi Suzuki, the Suzuki method of acting training develops physical strength, stamina, and agility while engaging the imagination and will of the actor. Through a series of walks, statues, and marches, students are taught to breathe and move from the core of their bodies. This training allows students to act from physical impulse, resulting in a deep and personal experience of language and the world of play. This class also counts as one activity course toward the physical education requirement.

View all of the Summer Arts Courses and Syllabi Online.

Enroll today! Space is limited!

 

Questions? Email us at: summerschool@brandeis.edu

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