Tag Archives: SummerSchool

Get online and get outside this summer!

Get online and get outside this summer!

Our online BISC 11a: Biodiversity Connections class will help you do both!

Photo of a lake, small island, trees, mountain, sky, and buildings representing bio-diversity

If you are looking to complete your Brandeis School of Science graduation requirement then check out BISC 11a: Biodiversity Connections.  (BISC 11a is open to any college student or degree recipient with an interest in the subject matter.  The course is also open to select high school students.)
This online course will help you discover the natural world by doing citizen science (via iNaturalist.org) in tandem with an exploration of ecology and evolution. So, if you are curious about the natural world and want to explore nature (from anywhere in the world), then this course is a great opportunity for you to get outside and discover local biodiversity.

Photo of a young woman working on her course work in a city park

BISC 11a is taught by Prof. Colleen Hitchcock of the Biology Department and Environmental Studies Program and is designed to promote local exploration of biodiversity through citizen science while you learn the fundamentals of ecology and evolution. Throughout the 10-week course you’ll have a chance to delve into the basics of biodiversity science and make contributions to biodiversity research by using a digital camera or cell phone to capture data about the biodiversity you interact with every day.
Biodiversity Connections is an entry-level science course designed to satisfy the School of Science graduation requirement and there are no prerequisites to this course! (The Science graduation requirement needs to be completed by all Brandeis students – not just students majoring in the Sciences!) 
Enrolled students will discover how everyone can make scientific contributions through citizen science and will use citizen science research to complement the scientific topics explored in each week’s online discussions. So get outside and explore the natural world regardless of if your summer is being spent in an urban center, suburb, or remote natural location while completing this online summer course.

Click here to learn more about online courses at Brandeis and how online classes are conducted!

Photo of a an ariel view of a city with busy highways and green spaces teeming with biodiversity.

Brandeis Anthropologist Javier Urcid teaches 2 courses this summer

Photo of Anthropology Professor Javier UrcidBrandeis Associate Professor and Chair of the Brandeis Anthropology Dept., Javier Urcid, will be teaching two classes this summer.  Prof. Urcid will be teaching ANTH 5a: Human Origins and ANTH 116a: Human Osteology. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, Prof. Urcid studies the development of ancient complex societies in Mesoamerica: the origin and societal functions of early writing, political economy and settlement patterns, and the social and ideological dimensions of mortuary practices.

Recently, Prof. Urcid was the feature of a video on his work helping students understand ancient societies using Brandeis’ rich collection of artifacts.

Several Anthropology courses are being offered this summer:

ANTH 1a: Introduction to the Comparative Study of Human Societies with Ieva Jusionyte
Sage class number: 2109

ANTH 5a: Human Origins with Javier Urcid
Sage class number: 2070

ANTH 61b: Language in American Life with Laura Ann John
Sage class number: 2110

ANTH 105a: Myth and Ritual with Adam Gamwell
Sage class number: 2111

ANTH 116a: Human Osteology with Javier Urcid
Sage class number: 2072

ANTH 129b: Global, Transnational, and Diasporic Communities with Noah Tamarkin
Sage class number: 2073

ANTH 144a: The Anthropology of Gender with Anna Jaysane-Darr
Sage class number: 2112

To register for 2012 Brandeis Summer Classes, visit:

http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/ready.html

New Summer Classes Added to Summer 2012!

3 new classes have been added to Summer 2012!

BIOL 172b – Growth Control and Cancer with Justin Dore
M, T, W, Th 9:00 – 10:50 AM
Summer Session I: May 29 to June 29, 2012
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
This course covers the fundamental rules of behavior of cells in multicellular organisms. We will examine cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern cell growth, and differentiation and survival in normal cells, as well as how this regulation is disrupted in cancer.

JOUR 89a – Contemporary Media: Internship and Analysis with Maura Jane Farrelly
Extended Summer Session: May 29 to August 3, 2012
Prerequisite: AMST 15a, 137b, or 138b
This course brings together students who are independently engaged in various media internships and provides an opportunity for them to exchange their experiences w

ith other students and to discuss and analyze related readings. Students will receive career guidance in the various communication fields and they will have an opportunity to practice job-hunting skills, such as resume and cover letter writing. Students who choose to satisfy the journalism minor’s internship option must take this course. Students should first contact Prof. Maura Jane Farrelly to discuss their proposed Internship, or for advice in finding an internship site.

HISP 104b – Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World with Jorge Arteta

M, T, Th 8:30 – 10:50 AM
Summer Session I: May 29 to June 29, 2012
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, fl
Prerequisite: 30-level Spanish course or equivalent.
This course offers an opportunity to expand the participants’ linguistic skills in Spanish while simultaneously deepening their understanding of Hispanic culture. The main theme of the course is the history and ideas that shape the Spanish-speaking world, from its peninsular origins to the realities of Spanish-speakers in the Americas, including the United States.

The following topics will be studied throughout the course:

  • Concepts of identity and culture
  • Religion and mythology in the course of history
  • Dynamics of nation formation
  • Hispanic peoples, ideas and languages in the USA

Pertinent vocabulary and complex grammar not mastered in previous courses will be studied, contextualized and applied during the course as appropriate. Please note that most of the study of grammar will be assigned to be done outside of class, as well as the course manual’s activities. Students will improve their listening skills, as well as develop new strategies to acquire new vocabulary and carry out the following functions in Spanish: narrating, describing, giving out advice and recommendations, comparing and contrasting, expressing opinions and providing valid arguments.

Registration is now open!

Check out all the summer course offerings at:

http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/courses/index.html

 

Brandeis Summer Students Studying on Campus

Prof. Flesch – One of Newsweek’s “Four Great College Professors”

Did you know that Newsweek Magazine named Brandeis Professor of English Literature William Flesch one of their “Four Great College Professors”?:
http://www.newsweek.com/2009/08/11/in-search-of-great-professors.html

This summer, Prof. Flesch is offering three great summer classes at Brandeis:

Antique English PenENG 33a – Shakespeare
Survey Shakespeare’s most powerful dramatic plays representing all periods of Shakespeare’s dramatic career.

ENG 147a – Film Noir
Study the classics of the film noir genre like “The Killers,” “The Maltese Falcon,” “Touch of Evil” as well as more modern contributions to the genre like “Chinatown,” and “Bladerunner”.

ENG 180a – Modern American Short Story
Explore the masterworks of American short fiction from the last hundred years.  Read stories by Henry James, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Cather, Flannery O’Connor, Hammett, West, Pynchon, Denis Johnson, and Stuart Dybeck.

Summer School is a fantastic opportunity for students to take a class with one of the top teachers in the country in a smaller, more intimate, summer class setting.


Brandeis Summer Instructor, Randall Geller, wins the prestigious Glatzer Prize

The Brandeis University Summer School would like to congratulate one of our summer instructors, Randy GellarRandall Geller, on winning the prestigious Glatzer Prize.

The Glatzer Prize is awarded each year to the most exceptional doctoral dissertation in the NEJS Department. The prize is named for Nahum Glatzer, who served as the Philip W. Lown Professor of Jewish Thought at Brandeis and served as Chairman of the Near Eastern and Judaic Studies Department at Brandeis from 1957 to 1969.

Mr. Geller will be teaching NEJS 189a: The Arab-Israeli Conflict this summer.  This course explores the origins and development of one of the most intractable conflicts of our time – the Arab-Israeli conflict. Students will examine the diplomatic and military options the two sides have used, within the limitations of international constraints, to achieve their objectives. The impact of oil, religious fundamentalism, and political militancy will be evaluated in this context. Special attention will be given to the developments of the last decade, including the building of a separation wall between Israelis and Palestinians beginning in 2004, the Second Lebanon War of 2006, the Gaza War of 2008-2009, and current plans and prospects for the peaceful resolution of the more than century-long conflict. Mr. Geller’s course will make extensive use of newscasts, documentaries and portions of dramatic movies to illuminate the history of the conflict.

This evening class is open to all students and meets in the first Summer Session (May 31-July 1, 2011) on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11AM – 1:30PM.  Interested students can review a course syllabus for NEJS 189a: The Arab-Israeli Conflict online.  To find out more about this course, and other Brandeis Summer School courses, visit the Summer School website.