Tag Archives: waltham

Thinking about a Economics major or minor? Start your study with ECON 10a this summer!

ECON 10A: Introduction to Microeconomics is intended for all possible economics majors, minors, and for all other students who plan to take Econ 20 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) later in their academic career. This is the first economics course that economics students should take at Brandeis, and anyone contemplating a major or minor should start with this course.

The course will give you an idea of the range of behaviors that economists investigate, introduce you to the basic tools that we use to analyze economic behavior, and apply these tools to public policy issues. Perhaps most important, this course will introduce you to the “economic way of thinking,” an approach to decision making that applies to personal decisions, to the decisions of businesses, labor unions and other organizations, and to the larger choices that society faces.

This course satisfies the School of Social Science (SS) distribution requirement and the Quantitative Reasoning (QR) component of the General University Requirements. It is also the first course for any student considering a concentration or minor in Economics.

This course has two “broad” goals. First, it is hoped that everyone will come out of this course a more educated citizen, being able to use basic economic principles to critically evaluate the arguments for and against public policy proposals (various tax proposals, immigration reform). Second, this course should give students the theoretical tools necessary for success in subsequent economics courses.

Learn more about registration for the Brandeis Summer School here.

Which Hogwarts’ house do you belong to?

Gryffindor, Slytherin, Ravenclaw or Hufflepuff? Discover your house loyalty this summer with William Flesch in his Young Adult Literature class (ENG 21A).

You will explore the purest form of story-telling and ponder what it means to be a person (human or otherwise). Since this is a summer class, the reading list is flexible and at the beginning of the course students and the instructor will brainstorm a set of readings together.

Book options may include:

  • Rowling: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  • Cooper: The Hunger Games
  • Stevenson: Kidnapped
  • Pullman: The Golden Compass
  • Lewis: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe
  • Valente: Space Opera
  • Lowry: The Giver

Interested in skipping straight to the heart of the narrative? Explore how very short fiction works in William Flesch’s Modern American Short Story class (ENG 180A).

You will be able to propose your preferred reading list and select which short stories you want to explore and examine further this summer. Past picks included writers as different as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Flannery O’Connor, Richard Wright, and Harry Turtledove.

William Flesch is a Professor of English at Brandeis and works on the “nature of literary experience, from Homer through present day movies, and on what an accurate description of literary experience can offer evolutionary psychologists and cognitive theorists.”  He has been cited by Newsweek as one of America’s “Great College Professors”: https://www.newsweek.com/four-great-college-professors-78703

Space for this summer is filling up quickly so reserve your spot today!

If you have any questions e-mail us at: summerschool@brandeis.edu.

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EXPLORE | EXPERIENCE | EXCEL

Remember to subscribe to our e-mail list to be notified of the latest class schedule updates and registration deadlines.

Registration for 2019 Summer School is now open!

The Brandeis University Summer School is excited to announce the opening of Summer 2019 registration in Sage.  Brandeis students can now enroll in summer classes for Summer Session 1 and 2 as well as the online session (Session 0).

We hope you will join us for a class this summer – on campus or online. We’re offering a variety of courses this year to help you fulfill degree requirements and explore new academic interests. Many students also use summer to focus on challenging courses like Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science, Psychology, or Economics. Some use summer term to work on a second or third major. Others use summer to lighten their course load in a future semester when they might be studying abroad or working at an internship.

Whatever your reason is, the Brandeis Summer School offers you the chance to study and connect with our talented faculty and fellow students in small classes – either on-campus or online!

About Summer School

The Brandeis Summer School is an open admission program and welcomes visiting students who regularly attend other colleges and universities. Visiting students can do not need to provide transcripts or proof that a course prerequisite has been satisfied (we trust that visiting students know best what they want and need for their academic progress). However, visiting students should check with their home institution (typically their Registrar’s Office) regarding the ability to transfer Brandeis courses back to your school. To assist you in obtaining this permission, we provide information on course levels and course numbering at Brandeis, as well as draft copies of our summer course syllabi.  One Brandeis semester course credit is equivalent to four units or four credit hours at other universities.

How To Register

For Brandeis students, registration for summer courses is very similar to registration in the Fall or Spring.  There are a few important differences which are summarized here:
http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/registration/visiting-students/index.html

When registering, Brandeis students also need to start the registration process by telling Sage you want your student record active for summer. In the Sage Student Center page, Brandeis students will need to click “Summer School Term Activation” to activate their record for summer before enrolling. Please consult our helpful step-by-step guide to registering for summer in Sage if you need assistance.

2019 Summer Session Dates

  • Session I – June 3 to July 5, 2019
  • Session II – July 8 to August 9, 2019
  • Online Session – June 3 to August 11, 2019

Our full academic calendar can be found here:
http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/calendars/academic-calendar/index.html

Please note that if you wish to register for an online course, you will first need to complete a brief online orientation. To enroll in the online orientation, please email summerschool@brandeis.edu with the online courses you wish to take. Upon successful completion of the orientation, you will receive a Permission Number to enroll. If you wish to enroll in an upper-level Economics course, you will need to contact Leslie Yanich, the Economics Department administrator, at lesliey@brandeis.edu, for a consent code.

Learn More

Website: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/

Email: summerschool@brandeis.edu

We look forward to learning with you this summer!

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EXPLORE | EXPERIENCE | EXCEL

Remember to subscribe to our e-mail list to be notified of the latest class schedule updates and registration deadlines.

Faculty Spotlight: Casey Golomski

casey.golomskiBrandeis University Summer School interviewed Casey Golomski, a lecturer in the Anthropology Department at Brandeis.  This summer, Casey will be teaching ANTH127a “Medicine, Body and Culture.” Registration is now open – click here to be directed to the enrollment page.

 

Brandeis University Summer School: How long have you been teaching at Brandeis? 

Casey Golomski: My home is in the Department of Anthropology. I am also Lecturer in Anthropology at UMASS Boston, and I formerly taught at Northeastern University. I matriculated to the Brandeis Anthropology PhD program in 2006 and successfully defended my dissertation this past March, so I will graduate this spring. Last spring I independently convened the course ANTH80a, “Anthropology of Religion.” I otherwise teach regularly “Introduction to Cultural Anthropology,” “Peoples and Cultures of Africa,” and “Watching Film, Seeing Culture.”

BUSS: What courses will you teach this summer? What can students expect?

CG: This summer I will teach ANTH127a, “Medicine, Body and Culture.” This course is a broad yet nuanced introduction to medical anthropology, engaging the social, economic and political dimensions of illness and healing across cultures. I’m very excited for the opportunity to convene this course. I consider myself a cultural anthropologist, but I am very involved in issues of bodies, aging and medicine. In the past, I’ve done work with traditional and Christian spiritual healers in southern Africa, as well as youth and shamanistic healing in the Hmong Diaspora in the US. My current research focuses effects of death and demographic shift from HIV/AIDS on life cycle rites in the the Kingdom of Swaziland. In the course, I’ll share some of these findings and works-in-progress.

To explain the syllabus a bit, we begin with historical precursors to the field, so how earlier scholars were writing about medicine, culture, society and power and consider how they laid certain intellectual foundations we still work with today. I designed a number of interesting case studies modules on: race and medicine the US; health, environment, and ecology, including how we are affected by wind; chronic illness; and even sleep and sleeplessness! This course attracts many students who are Biology, International Global Studies, or Health Science Society and Policy majors or are pre-med, and we are going to interrogate “biomedicine (our own system and understandings of health) and programs and initiatives of “global public health,” as well as learning how undergraduate students in Africa learn to become doctors in some resource deprived settings there. At the end of the course, we consider how to apply our culturally-nuanced findings in practice and public policy. We draw case studies from Anglo-, Hispanic- and Native North, Central and South America, Western Europe, Eastern and Southern Africa, East and South Asia and the Pacific.

BUSS: What is unique about summer courses – either for the students or faculty?

CG: I like the opportunities that summer school schedules provide. While the course is condensed to make up for a full semester’s content, I make sure to stagger the work expectations so students are able to better relish the material. While the readings are pretty equitable across the course schedule, some days will be more concentrated my own material and lectures. Other days use a “conversation circle” format where we each share individually- or group-assigned readings with each other. We will read scholarly and some popular writing which can be a much quicker read, like the best-seller “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” I think summer is a good time to catch up on “leisure” reading, and this combination lets students see how books in the library and popular books can converse in interesting ways. We will watch a number of films as well.  Students will have three different options for a final project, including doing their own short ethnographic investigation which a summer course permits more time and freedom to take on.

 

Registration for ANTH127a and all summer course is now open.  Click here for more information, or to sign up!