Category Archives: University Requirements

Considering an ECON major or minor? Start your study with ECON 10a!

Student reviewing course materials on his laptop with a background illustrating the stock market rising.

ECON 10A: Introduction to Microeconomics is intended for all possible economics majors, minors, and for all other students who plan to take Econ 20 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) later in their academic career. This is the first economics course that economics students should take at Brandeis, and anyone contemplating a major or minor should start with this course.

The course will give you an idea of the range of behaviors that economists investigate, introduce you to the basic tools that we use to analyze economic behavior, and apply these tools to public policy issues. Perhaps most important, this course will introduce you to the “economic way of thinking,” an approach to decision making that applies to personal decisions, to the decisions of businesses, labor unions and other organizations, and to the larger choices that society faces.

This course satisfies the School of Social Science (SS) distribution requirement and the Quantitative Reasoning (QR) component of the General University Requirements. It is also the first course for any student considering a concentration or minor in Economics.

This course has two “broad” goals. First, it is hoped that everyone will come out of this course a more educated citizen, being able to use basic economic principles to critically evaluate the arguments for and against public policy proposals (various tax proposals, immigration reform). Second, this course should give students the theoretical tools necessary for success in subsequent economics courses.

Learn more about registration for the Brandeis Summer School here.

Get online and get outside this summer!

Get online and get outside this summer!

Our online BISC 11a: Biodiversity Connections class will help you do both!

Photo of a lake, small island, trees, mountain, sky, and buildings representing bio-diversity

If you are looking to complete your Brandeis School of Science graduation requirement then check out BISC 11a: Biodiversity Connections.  (BISC 11a is open to any college student or degree recipient with an interest in the subject matter.  The course is also open to select high school students.)
This online course will help you discover the natural world by doing citizen science (via iNaturalist.org) in tandem with an exploration of ecology and evolution. So, if you are curious about the natural world and want to explore nature (from anywhere in the world), then this course is a great opportunity for you to get outside and discover local biodiversity.

Photo of a young woman working on her course work in a city park

BISC 11a is taught by Prof. Colleen Hitchcock of the Biology Department and Environmental Studies Program and is designed to promote local exploration of biodiversity through citizen science while you learn the fundamentals of ecology and evolution. Throughout the 10-week course you’ll have a chance to delve into the basics of biodiversity science and make contributions to biodiversity research by using a digital camera or cell phone to capture data about the biodiversity you interact with every day.
Biodiversity Connections is an entry-level science course designed to satisfy the School of Science graduation requirement and there are no prerequisites to this course! (The Science graduation requirement needs to be completed by all Brandeis students – not just students majoring in the Sciences!) 
Enrolled students will discover how everyone can make scientific contributions through citizen science and will use citizen science research to complement the scientific topics explored in each week’s online discussions. So get outside and explore the natural world regardless of if your summer is being spent in an urban center, suburb, or remote natural location while completing this online summer course.

Click here to learn more about online courses at Brandeis and how online classes are conducted!

Photo of a an ariel view of a city with busy highways and green spaces teeming with biodiversity.

Last Call for 2015 Brandeis Summer Courses

Online registration is no longer available, however, you may still add or drop a class by emailing summerschool@brandeis.edu until Tuesday July 7th.

See more details about important upcoming dates here.

These great summer classes may still have room:

ANTH 7a – Great Discoveries in Archaeology
BIOL 14a – Genetics and Genomics
CHEM 11b-1 – General Chemistry II – Section 1
CHEM 18b-1 – General Chemistry Laboratory II – Section 1
CHEM 25b – Organic Chemistry II, Lectures
CHEM 29b – Organic Chemistry II, Laboratory
ECON 20a – Introduction to Macroeconomics
ECON 82b – Macroeconomic Theory
ECON 171a – Financial Economics
ENG 180a – The Modern American Short Story
HISP 32a – Intermediate Spanish: Conversation
MATH 8a – Introduction to Probability and Statistics
MATH 10b – Techniques of Calculus (b)
MUS 35a – History of Rock
MUS 55a – Music in Film
PHYS 10b – Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II
PHYS 18b – Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II Lab
PSYC 52a – Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology
THA 15b-2 – Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication (Section 2)
THA 15b-3 – Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication (Section 3)

In addition to getting ahead with academic requirements and unique learning experiences, Brandeis Summer School students have priority access to all of the exciting summer activities on and off campus this summer. Activities include BBQs, trips into Boston, Cambridge, and Newport, ice cream socials, movie nights, and more. All of the activities are sponsored by the Summer School and are 100% free. But sign up fast, there are a limited number of spaces for some of these events.

For more information on how to join in the summer fun contact our summer activities director Alex Jacobs at amjacobs@brandeis.edu.

We hope to see you this summer!

SUMMER CLASSES ARE STILL AVAILABLE. GET THEM WHILE THEY’RE HOT! ONLINE REGISTRATION ENDS FRIDAY

Still need plans for the summer? We’ve got you covered with great classes to help you satisfy academic requirements and strengthen your skills. The accelerated summer curriculum offers a great way to get ahead in a short amount of time. See how you can still meet university requirements in these Summer Session II courses:

CREATIVE ARTS:

FA 30b – History of Art II: From the Renaissance to the Modern Age
MUS 35a – History of Rock
MUS 55a – Music in Film

FOREIGN LANGUAGE:

HISP 32a – Intermediate Spanish: Conversation

HUMANITIES:

ENG 180a – The Modern American Short Story

QUANTITATIVE REASONING:

MATH 8a – Introduction to Probability and Statistics
PHYS 10b – Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II

SCIENCE:

BIOL 14a – Genetics and Genomics
BIOL 101a – Molecular Biotechnology
CHEM 11a-2 – General Chemistry I – Section 2 (Summer Ses. 2)
CHEM 11b-1 – General Chemistry II – Section 1 (Summer Ses. 2)
CHEM 25b – Organic Chemistry II, Lectures

SOCIAL SCIENCES:

ANTH 7a – Great Discoveries in Archaeology
ECON 28b – The Global Economy
ECON 82b – Macroeconomic Theory
ECON 171a – Financial Economics
SOC 117a – Sociology of Work and Gender
SOC 130a – Families and Kinship
SOC 155b – Protest, Politics, and Change: Social Movements

WRITING INTENSIVE:

PSYC 52a – Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology

These classes start July 6th but online registration ends this Friday.

brandeis-summer-2015-enroll-now

Summer School helps Transfer Students Catch up with Brandeis University Requirements

Nyah Macklin comes to Brandeis from New Haven, CT to study African and African American Studies.  As a transfer student, she took advantage of summer school so she can graduate in a timely fashion. For Nyah, it came down to a choice between taking calculus or organic chemistry over the summer session last year. She chose to learn organic chemistry. Although the class is the largest in the Summer School, Nyah felt at many times like she was getting one on one attention. The class was structured and taught in a way that took advantage of the ability to focus in depth on a single subject.

nyahmacklin-16-brandeissummerschool-organicchemistry

During the academic year, Nyah is very active in her college community serving as undergraduate student union president. She is also heavily involved in theatre activities at Brandeis with the Undergraduate Theater Collective, Brandeis Ensemble Theater, and Company B Acapella.

This summer Brandeis welcomes a new lecturer in Organic Chemistry, Kristen Mascall, who will be teaching the following courses in Organic Chemistry that Nyah took last year:

CHEM 25a – Organic Chemistry, Lectures

Summer Session I: June 1 to July 3, 2015
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 10b, 11b, 15b or the equivalent. The corresponding lab for this course is CHEM 29a, Sage class number: 2159. This course meets the first half of the organic chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course CHEM 29a. It is also useful for individuals in the physical and life science fields who wish to gain a working knowledge of organic chemistry. The course will examine the important classes of organic compounds of chemical, biological, and medicinal interest. Attention is focused on the relationship between structure and reactivity. Current theoretical concepts of structure, bonding, and mechanism form a basis for the interpretation of the properties and interactions as well as the synthesis and transformation of a wide range of organic compounds.

CHEM 25b – Organic Chemistry, Lectures

Summer Session II: July 6 to August 7, 2015
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 25a or its equivalent. The corresponding lab for this course is CHEM 29b, Sage class number: 2160. As a continuation of CHEM 25a, this course meets the second half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course, CHEM 29b.

CHEM 29a – Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

Summer Session I: June 1 to July 3, 2015
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18b or 19b or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25a. Dropping CHEM 25a necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with the lab. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits. The laboratory affords practical experience in the purification, isolation, and analysis of organic compounds. Various techniques include extraction, distillation, chromatography, and crystallization.

CHEM 29b – Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

Summer Session II: July 6 to August 7, 2015
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 29a or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25b. Dropping CHEM 25b necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with the lab. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits. A continuation of CHEM 29a. This course is designed to give experience in the important techniques of organic synthesis. It includes synthesis of typical organic compounds and characterization using analytic and instrumental procedures.