Category: Instructor Profile (page 1 of 4)

Good Storytellers Can Change the World

Join Professor David Sherman at JBS this summer for Storytelling as Social Practice, to be held from June 1 – July 31, 2020

“The best argument in the world won’t change a person’s mind. The only thing that can do that is a good story.” (Richard Powers, The Overstory, 488)

This course builds on the vibrant storytelling movement currently traveling across the U.S.

With a focus on nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers such asIrving, Poe, Hawthorne, Twain, Chekhov, Mansfield, Hemingway, O’Connor, García Márquez, Johnson, Wallace, and Moore, this course will help to answer short story questions such as: How did the genre of the short story emerge and what distinctive work has it performed in its long and protean history? And why does the short story still matter?

You will consider the formal features of plots, characters, and narrative discourse, as well as read theoretical accounts of the role that narrative plays in personal identity, community belonging, moral judgment, historical knowledge, and political authority.

You will also participate in workshops to craft and perform stories as part of the Brandeis Storytelling Brigade. Through a series of collaborative exercises and rehearsals, you will develop a repertoire of at least four stories: one fictional story for young children, one folk tale for young children, one story based on historical research for young adults or adults, and one autobiographical or fictional story for young adults or adults.

This course will help you to develop skills in:

  • holding stage presence in body and voice
  • organizing and promoting performance events
  • participating constructively in a collaborative performance team
  • designing intricate plots, with a sense of how beginnings, middles, and ends shape human time
  • understanding character psychology and development as a part of a character system
  • researching the history of folk stories, as a strategy for doing cultural history
  • analyzing narrative in theoretically sophisticated ways, including political and philosophical investigations into how stories work and what they do
  • writing critically about the short story literary genre, as it has evolved from antiquity to the present

By the end of the JBS program you’ll have acquired a repertoire of stories and skills that can support your work in education, political advocacy, creative writing, theater, stand-up, clinical psychology, and other realms where stories circulate. By knowing the stories that you’re capable of telling, you can learn more about where and how you can be effective in the world.

APPLY TODAY!

Visit our application page to fill out a Summer 2020 JBS Application.

Questions?

If you have questions about the program, please email Prof. David Sherman at: dsherman@brandeis.edu.

Tell me your zip code, and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.

The environments where we live, learn, work, play, and pray shape our day-to-day lives and long-term health and well-being in complex ways. Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at the California Endowment, famously said “tell me your zip code and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.”

If you are interested in understanding how these social and structural factors affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States, then register for this summer’s Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care course!

This Summer School course addresses the following inequity concerns and how they relate to health:

  • In New Orleans, the life expectancy of residents from the poorest zip code in the city is 26 years lower than for residents of the wealthiest zip code.
  • The median net worth for Black Bostonians is $8.00 compared to
    White median net worth of $247,500.00.
  • In 2015, women working full-time earned 80% of what men
    working full-time earned, and if trends continue, white women will have to wait until 2056 to see equal work for equal pay.
  • Hispanic women will have to wait 232 years for the pay gap to close without active policy intervention.

This course will also review and critique key theoretical frameworks and evidence from public health, social policy, and community development that demonstrate how social and structural factors influence health and well-being, and how these same factors drive health disparities and inequities.

Each week, a case study of a health equity 2 policy, practice, or initiative will be analyzed, and the opportunities and challenges presented by the case will be discussed.

This course also prepares students interested in a wide range of disciplines to understand and advance health and equity in their future careers by achieving the following course outcomes:

  • Define key terms and constructs related to health disparities and health equity.
  • Identify patterns of inequities in health status by race, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status from an epidemiological perspective.
  • Explain how systems, policies, and ideologies contribute to disparities in rates of illness, quality of life, premature death, mental health, and population-level health inequities.
  • Identify and critique current theories for racial/ethnic disparities in health status, access and quality.
  • Become familiar with and critically assess conceptual models,
    policies, initiatives, and strategies for reducing and/or eliminating
    health disparities.

Space is Limited! Register Now!

Course Details:

HSSP 114B: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care 

With Jessica Santos, Ph.D.

Summer Session 2: July 8 to August 9, 2019

Meets Mondays, Tuesday, and Thursdays

View the Full Syllabus here.

Questions?

Email us at summerschool@brandeis.edu

Which Hogwarts’ house do you belong to?

Gryffindor, Slytherin, Ravenclaw or Hufflepuff? Discover your house loyalty this summer with William Flesch in his Young Adult Literature class (ENG 21A).

You will explore the purest form of story-telling and ponder what it means to be a person (human or otherwise). Since this is a summer class, the reading list is flexible and at the beginning of the course students and the instructor will brainstorm a set of readings together.

Book options may include:

  • Rowling: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  • Cooper: The Hunger Games
  • Stevenson: Kidnapped
  • Pullman: The Golden Compass
  • Lewis: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe
  • Valente: Space Opera
  • Lowry: The Giver

Interested in skipping straight to the heart of the narrative? Explore how very short fiction works in William Flesch’s Modern American Short Story class (ENG 180A).

You will be able to propose your preferred reading list and select which short stories you want to explore and examine further this summer. Past picks included writers as different as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Flannery O’Connor, Richard Wright, and Harry Turtledove.

William Flesch is a Professor of English at Brandeis and works on the “nature of literary experience, from Homer through present day movies, and on what an accurate description of literary experience can offer evolutionary psychologists and cognitive theorists.”  He has been cited by Newsweek as one of America’s “Great College Professors”: https://www.newsweek.com/four-great-college-professors-78703

Space for this summer is filling up quickly so reserve your spot today!

If you have any questions e-mail us at: summerschool@brandeis.edu.

———————————————————————————-

EXPLORE | EXPERIENCE | EXCEL

Remember to subscribe to our e-mail list to be notified of the latest class schedule updates and registration deadlines.

Experience Organic Chemistry with Kristen Mascall this Summer

Kristen joined the Chemistry Department in August ’14 to begin her transition into the role of master teacher responsible for the undergraduate organic chemistry sequence. As a pre-health requirement, the organic chemistry lecture and labs reach near enrollment of 200 students each semester. The Summer School, which has been offering pre-health courses as the core of its offerings for forty plus years, offers an opportunity for students to complete this important requirement in an different format and as a primary focus.

kristingmascall-brandeis-organic-chemistry-summer-2015Kristen earned a PhD from Dartmouth college and specializes in the areas of chemical education, organic synthesis, and medicinal chemistry. Her journey to this point began at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry and Mathematics. Although her initial post graduate plans were to become a dentist, an interest in organic chemistry was sparked after taking an upper-level undergraduate course “Organic Synthesis and Mechanisms.” “I could not shake the desire to learn more about this fascinating subject” she says.

During her graduate tenure, her love for organic chemistry grew along with a new found interest in teaching. With the support of her graduate advisor, Dr. Peter Jacobi, she finished her doctoral work and went on to join the Postdoctoral Faculty Fellow Program at Boston University, where she received further training in teaching Organic chemistry. After two years at BU, She became a member of the team of talented Chemistry faculty here at Brandeis dedicated to quality teaching and research.

Teaching at Brandeis has been a wonderful experience for Kristen and she is looking forward to working with the summer students staring June 1st.

Summer 2015 Courses taught by Kristen Mascall are:
CHEM 25a – Organic Chemistry, Lectures | Session I
CHEM 25b – Organic Chemistry, Lectures | Session II
CHEM 29a – Organic Chemistry Laboratory I | Session I
CHEM 29b – Organic Chemistry Laboratory II | Session II

ENROLL NOW!

Picture Yourself in a Digital Photography class this summer with Scott Patrick Wiener

Summer is a great time to get your digital camera out and improve your photography skills, learning in a small group with an acclaimed professional. Professor Scott Patrick Wiener is offering an introductory course in digital photography at Brandeis this summer that fulfills the general University requirement in Creative Arts. Students will spend time discussing form and technique before shifting into conceptual content, the moment where the students photographic ‘voices’ become most pronounced and articulate.

“The photograph is a 2-dimensional surface that references the past as an object in the present.” – Scott Wiener

scott-wiener-brandeis-summer2015-faculty-digital-photographyScott earned his BFA at the Massachusetts College of Art, and went on to earn his Masters at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where he developed a more critical position toward the medium of photography and fell in love with teaching while working as a TA for his mentor, Claire Pentecost. He has been teaching at Brandeis for 5 years.

When Scott is not teaching he enjoys staying active in the Boston art community, and is looking forward to participating in a show at the Institute of Contemporary Art this June. His work has been profiled and reviewed in The Boston Globe, Temporary Land Bridge, Hyperallergic, Big Red & Shiny, ARTnews, TimeOut Chicago, and Paper & Carriage. Some of Scott’s work can be seen on his website.

Scott-Wiener-Grand-Canyon-Arizona-in-Violet

Grand Canyon, Arizona in Violet (circa 1985-86) *detail Year: 2014 Medium: Sunlight, Inkjet Transparency, Construction Paper Dimensions: 9” x 12”

Scott-Wiener-Northeast-United-States-in-Forest-Green

Northeast United States in Forest Green (circa 1975) *detail Year: 2013 Dimensions: 9” x 12” Medium: Sunlight, Inkjet Transparency, Construction Paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t miss this terrific opportunity to learn more about photography as an art form while developing your skills. Enroll today!

FA 9a – Introduction to Digital Photography

Summer Session I: June 1 to July 3, 2015

This is an experiential learning course. This course may be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.

This course is an introduction to the visual forms and concepts of the photographic image. A range of digital techniques are covered along with aspects of the history of photography. Students must provide their own digital camera. Field trips and image presentations also supplement the studio aspect of the course.

Scott-Wiener-Italy-in-Blue

Italy in Blue (circa 1989) *detail Year: 2012 Dimensions: 9” x 24” Medium: Sunlight, Inkjet Transparency, Construction Paper

 

« Older posts

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)