Category Archives: Online Learning

Welcome Back!

It is the first day of classes here at Brandeis University and the campus is humming with excitement!

As the amazing summer comes to a close, the early signs of fall are already apparent. Daylight is beginning to soften, classrooms are filled with earnest students, and the evenings are crisp and cool in Waltham.

As you settle into your new class routines, we wish you the best with your studies this fall. If you encounter a course that you are unable to fit into your schedule, or if a required course is already closed, be sure to check back with us to see if we will offer it in Summer 2020!

Curious when classes will be announced, registration opens, or if new classes have been added? Join our email list so that you will be the first to know about any summer school updates!

If your summer plans take you away from Waltham, you can still earn Brandeis credits and continue your degree progress by taking an online summer course.  Online courses give you the flexibility to balance your summer work, travel, family commitments and social life. Learn more about online classes here.

If you have any questions about the upcoming summer, check out our website for more information or send us an email at summerschool@brandeis.edu. We are always happy to discuss any items of interest with you.

Enjoy the fall semester!

Summer School Late Registration

Summer School Late Registration for Session 1 and Session O!

Although self-service registration in Sage has closed for Session 1 and Session O classes, you can still register for classes by emailing our office.

Mention “SUMSCH2019” in your enrollment email and we will waive the Late Registration fee!

Register by emailing us now!

Use this Summer to:
  • Earn credits toward graduation, and fulfill major, minor, and graduation requirements
  • Focus your attention on one or two challenging classes at a time.
  • Prepare for study abroad or make time for an internship by lightening your course load in future semesters
  • Take a class that you always wanted to take and explore a new passion.
  • Avoid future waitlists for popular courses.
  • Work on a second major or minor.
  • Enjoy class sizes that are smaller than the same courses in the Fall and Spring semesters.
Course Details:

Take a look at our Summer Course Listings and learn more about Online Classes.

Balance Work and Play:

Review course workload by browsing summer course syllabi.

Hurry! This offer ends on May 31!

Email any of your questions to summerschool@brandeis.edu.

Still Undecided on your Major/Minor?

Do you want to explore your major or minor options but haven’t had the time? Brandeis Summer School provides students with a general overview of many different fields of study by offering several introductory courses over the summer.

Perhaps you want to consider philosophical questions such as: What can we know about the world external to our senses? What can we know about the thoughts and feelings of others? What is the relationship between our minds and our brains? What makes an action right or wrong? The PHIL 1A: Introduction to Philosophy course aims to motivate these questions and introduce students to the methods of contemporary analytic philosophy.

Maybe you want to study the basics of neuroscience from a biological perspective: How does the brain talk to the body? How is visual information transformed from the eye to the brain? How does learning and memory work? The NPSY 11B: Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience course considers cells, circuits of neurons, and regions of the brain, but does not require prior specific biological knowledge.

Or maybe you wonder about “Globalization” and how it touches our lives more each and every day. The IGS 10A: Introduction to International and Global Studies class introduces the historical origins of globalization, then addresses the challenges of globalization to national and international governance, economic success, individual and group identities, cultural diversity, and the environment.

Perhaps you want to join the journey through the bio-cultural transformations of humanity, which highlights the emergence of bipedal locomotion, the increased levels of encephalization, changes in subsistence practices, the control of fire, the appearance of language, and the anthropogenic impacts of the global dispersal of modern humans, in ANTH 5A – Human Origins.

Whatever your interest, the Summer School offers courses from a wide variety of academic disciplines including: Anthropology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Contemporary Art, Economics, English, Fine Arts, Health Care Policy, History, International and Global Studies, Literature, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Physics, Psychology, Religious Studies, Screenplay Writing, Sociology, and Theater Arts.

Explore all of our summer course offerings and register today!

If you have questions you can always email us at summerschool@brandeis.edu.

We look forward to learning with you this summer!

Pursue your Passion for the Arts this Summer!

Are you interested in exploring your creative side this summer? It is the perfect time to take a course in the arts with Brandeis Summer School!

Summer class options include:
FA 165A: Contemporary Art – ONLINE CLASS!

This course addresses art at the turn of the 20th century with attention to intersections of art and identity, politics, economy, and history. It will begin with discussions of art in the United States as New York City established itself as the capital of contemporary art and then move to consider art communities around the world that have become prominent as the art world, like politics and the economy, have become increasingly globalized.

ENG 21A: Young Adult Literature

Like myth, Young Adult literature brings us to the most elemental aspects of literary experience, and it does that in the most compelling and interesting way. It takes the experiences of young adults as seriously as they should be taken, and offers joy and consolation to its audience. In this course students will examine what is genuinely great about the work of Young Adult authors like J.K. Rowling, Suzanne Collins, Philip Pullman, and Lois Lowry. You’ll study how literature works, and in particular what makes narrative powerful.

ENG 79A: Screenwriting Workshop: Beginning Screenplay

There’s never been a better time to become a screenwriter. Breakthroughs in technology, production, and distribution have heightened the demand for good scripts. Whether you want to write a micro-budget indie or a Hollywood blockbuster, this course provides all the essential tools you’ll need. Learn the fundamentals – structure, story arc, character development – and develop the first act of your feature screenplay. You’ll also watch and analyze recent movies. You’ll never look at a movie the same way again!

FA 3A: Introduction to Drawing I

Through a solid understanding of its form and principles, students will be encouraged to instigate intuitive and open responses to perceptual and conceptual sources. Students will address the role of drawing as part of their creative process.

FA 178B: Seminar on Chinese Calligraphy: History and Practice

This seminar examines the art and history of Chinese calligraphy. The goal is to introduce students of different Chinese-language levels (not limited to native-speakers) to canonical works of calligraphy as well as the enthusiasm and creativity these works have generated through the ages. From anonymous oracle bones and stone inscriptions to famed masterpieces, such as Wang Xizhi’s “Lanting Pavilion Preface,” and from original renderings to copies of others’ compositions, this course showcases the kaleidoscopic range that makes calligraphy a visual-linguistic art form beyond “words.” The multifaceted functions of stylized writing—such as for political, religious, and expressive purposes—will also be explored.

ENG 180A: The Modern American Short Story

Short stories bring you to the heart of narrative in a way that no other kind of literature does. Novels, plays, and movies have time to do world-building, and therefore they can give you a sense of what’s unique about their world. But short stories have to be far more direct, have to interact with readers in their own world. Over 5 weeks students will explore many of these worlds as they read and discuss several short stories every class!

THA 130A-1 & 2: Suzuki

Developed by the Japanese theater artist Tadashi Suzuki, the Suzuki method of acting training develops physical strength, stamina, and agility while engaging the imagination and will of the actor. Through a series of walks, statues, and marches, students are taught to breathe and move from the core of their bodies. This training allows students to act from physical impulse, resulting in a deep and personal experience of language and the world of play. This class also counts as one activity course toward the physical education requirement.

View all of the Summer Arts Courses and Syllabi Online.

Enroll today! Space is limited!

 

Questions? Email us at: summerschool@brandeis.edu

Get online and get outside this summer!

Get online and get outside this summer!

Our online BISC 11a: Biodiversity Connections class will help you do both!

Photo of a lake, small island, trees, mountain, sky, and buildings representing bio-diversity

If you are looking to complete your Brandeis School of Science graduation requirement then check out BISC 11a: Biodiversity Connections.  (BISC 11a is open to any college student or degree recipient with an interest in the subject matter.  The course is also open to select high school students.)
This online course will help you discover the natural world by doing citizen science (via iNaturalist.org) in tandem with an exploration of ecology and evolution. So, if you are curious about the natural world and want to explore nature (from anywhere in the world), then this course is a great opportunity for you to get outside and discover local biodiversity.

Photo of a young woman working on her course work in a city park

BISC 11a is taught by Prof. Colleen Hitchcock of the Biology Department and Environmental Studies Program and is designed to promote local exploration of biodiversity through citizen science while you learn the fundamentals of ecology and evolution. Throughout the 10-week course you’ll have a chance to delve into the basics of biodiversity science and make contributions to biodiversity research by using a digital camera or cell phone to capture data about the biodiversity you interact with every day.
Biodiversity Connections is an entry-level science course designed to satisfy the School of Science graduation requirement and there are no prerequisites to this course! (The Science graduation requirement needs to be completed by all Brandeis students – not just students majoring in the Sciences!) 
Enrolled students will discover how everyone can make scientific contributions through citizen science and will use citizen science research to complement the scientific topics explored in each week’s online discussions. So get outside and explore the natural world regardless of if your summer is being spent in an urban center, suburb, or remote natural location while completing this online summer course.

Click here to learn more about online courses at Brandeis and how online classes are conducted!

Photo of a an ariel view of a city with busy highways and green spaces teeming with biodiversity.