“Friendraising” in Nantucket

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On the ferry to Nantucket

It’s hard to believe that my internship at Living on Earth is now over. I miss the creative and supportive atmosphere, the interesting stories I helped produce, and of course, I miss working on such important mission.

My experiences during my last week reminded me how important that mission really is. To close the internship, I attended a “friendraising” event that the show hosted in Nantucket with the other interns in the office. I had the opportunity to tour the UMass Field Station on the island (where the event took place) and listen to a few fantastic speakers, like New York Times bestselling author Carl Safina. At the event, I met students and adults from all over who were passionate about protecting the ocean. And the speakers shared emerging science that may be able to help us connect with, and therefore

With the rest of the Living on Earth family in Nantucket
With the rest of the Living on Earth family in Nantucket

preserve, our environment. In fact, there is even emerging science being studied at the field station itself. 

One line of one of the speeches got to me in particular. Safina said,  “We now know, and by that I mean the few scientists that read the paper know that….” He then went on to say that most of what the scientific community knows about is not  known by the general public. That is, a huge portion of scientific knowledge is inaccessible to the very people that scientific issues affect.

This is why journalism is important. Journalism is a medium that can make scientific papers, complicated policies, and other jargon-filled issues accessible to the ordinary person. Journalism has the power to boost scientific literacy and expose important truths. I am so glad that I was able to learn about this field through my internship!

Recording my own piece
Recording my own piece

I’ve been able to meet inspiring individuals who we invited to the show who are trying to make a difference on our planet. I’ve been able to learn about the creative processes that go into making a radio piece. And I’ve been able to work on every step of that process. I feel so grateful for the opportunity to be part of it.

I hope to continue exploring my interests in journalism and the environment. In fact, I’m taking both environmental and journalism courses this upcoming semester. I’m not sure exactly what I want to do after graduation. But I know that my internship prepared me to work well in a team, to think creatively and to be passionate about working hard in whatever field I choose.

My internship’s over, but I know that the connections I made this summer are not. I met mentors and friends that I hope to stay in touch with for a long time. To all of my friends who I have told to listen to the show: don’t quit just yet. There are still 5 or 6 pieces I’ve produced that have not yet aired. Keep your eyes peeled!

 

~Jay Feinstein

Social Justice WOW Recipient

1 thought on ““Friendraising” in Nantucket”

  1. It was really inspiring to read that your organization finds approaches in combatting environmental injustices. I think it’s even more amazing that you have used journalism as a medium of accessibility for ordinary citizens who are affected by various environmental issues but don’t have the language to comprehend them. I get the feeling that the work you were doing aligned with your personal goals and interests. I would love to hear more about your podcast too.

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