Post 3: Reflecting on RepresentWomen

I helped write content for RepresentWomen during my time there as an intern. I wrote articles that went on the website and the Medium blog, and I also promoted them on social media. I think that my articles helped get RepresentWomen’s messages across by making arguments for increased women’s representation, providing information about fair voting systems, and helping people understand why these reforms are important and relevant to their own lives. 

I also got an article published in The Fulcrum, a new media outlet that focuses on reporting on democracy reforms. The article will go live on August 6, and is about the Fair Representation Act. The piece will hopefully get more people on board with the legislation by explaining how it will increase women’s representation.

I wrote articles for the Civically Re-engaged Women blog as well, to promote their Seneca Falls Revisited Conference. This event will commemorate the first women’s rights convention in the United States and bring together women leaders from across the country to discuss women’s participation in society and politics. 

Hopefully my writing impacts the organization by getting people’s attention and showing them why what RepresentWomen stands for is important. Words have power, and when used correctly, they can get people to care about and mobilize around an issue. 

I learned that in the world of social justice work, organizations can have a lot of admirable ambition but not always have the capacity to achieve everything they want to. They instead have to make priorities. If I hear about a project that’s lower priority for the organization but is of interest to me, I can try to be proactive by asking how I can help or getting started on it on my own. 

For example, sometimes I would hear about an idea for an article or blog post during a meeting, and then before I could get specific guidelines, the topic would change to another task. Even though less time was spent talking about the writing project, I knew my work would still be appreciated if I took the initiative to get started on it and let other people focus on projects that were priorities to them.

I wish I had known when I started that I would need to make a bigger effort to step out of my comfort zone and try something new. I very quickly fell into the habit of picking up tasks that were focused on writing because I knew that was something I enjoyed and could do. If I had known how easy it would be for me to get stuck in that rut, I would have pushed myself harder to ask for different types of tasks earlier on. 

The advice I would give to someone pursuing an internship at a nonprofit is to always ask for more to do instead of waiting to be given something to do. Delegating tasks takes a lot of time, and in a small organization, like the one I worked at, there is not a lot of that to spare. Don’t worry about “bothering” people by asking them for more to do, because you will be helping them in the long run by allowing them to use your time, skills, and effort in the most efficient way possible. 

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