The Brandeis GPS blog

Insights on online learning, tips for finding balance, and news and updates from Brandeis GPS

Tag: healthcare (page 1 of 2)

Healthcare Delivery in the U.S.

The healthcare system in the U.S. is made up of both public and private programs. Clinicians, hospitals, patients, insurance plans, and regulators intersect to form a complex, interconnected network. To navigate the U.S. healthcare system successfully, health and medical stakeholders must have a fundamental understanding of the events and policies that have shaped the current environment in which they operate.

Brandeis GPS will be offering Healthcare Delivery in the U.S. during our upcoming October session. The fully online, 10-week course will provide an overview of how the U.S. system has developed, and place a substantial focus on how healthcare data has developed over time and informed changes to the delivery system.

The course examines how health informatics supports, influences, and is influenced by the business side of health care. It is an introduction to health care business systems and models with a particular emphasis on the value of health information technology (HIT) to the organization. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Discuss knowledgeably the state of health care in the United States
  • Evaluate options for measuring health status and financing health care and examine options for
    providing health care both acute and chronic
  • Examine public health care and the role of the government in the delivery of health care
  • Explain the role of information systems in providing health care and measuring health care quality

At Brandeis GPS, you can take up to two courses before enrolling in one of our 12 online Master’s degree programs. If you’re interested in exploring the MS in Health and Medical Informatics or would like to learn more about healthcare delivery in the U.S. to fill a skills gap, contact the  GPS office for more information or to request a syllabus: 781-736-8787, gps@brandeis.edu, or submit your information.

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: HIMSS

spotlight-CHANGED-300x200SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where: Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS), Membership Operations in Arlington, VA

About: HIMSS is a global, cause-based, not-for-profit organization focused on better health through information technology (IT). HIMSS leads efforts to optimize health engagements and care outcomes using information technology. HIMSS produces health IT thought leadership, education, events, market research and media services around the world. Founded in 1961, HIMSS encompasses more than 61,000 individuals, of which 79% work in healthcare provider, governmental and not-for-profit organizations across the globe, plus over 640 corporations and 400 not-for-profit partner organizations, that share this cause. HIMSS, headquartered in Chicago, serves the global health IT community with additional offices in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

Position: Manager, Membership Operations

Consider joining the talented staff at HIMSS as Manager, Membership Operations as we transform health through information technology.   In this newly-created position, you will provide management of the day-to-day operations of Continua and Personal Connected Health Alliance (PCHA) programs. This position works in concert with the Executive Director of Continua to ensure that members derive value from their memberships and that the duties of the organization are fulfilled. Responsibilities include direct member contact to resolve day-to-day and complex issues, development of membership retention strategies, planning and execution of events, support for the PCHA Board of Directors, general operations, and assistance with budgets and strategic planning.

  1. Member relationship management. Communicate with individual members and work to resolve issues. Work closely with the PCHA sales team to drive high (>90%) member renewal rates and counsel members on value of different membership options. Answer incoming correspondence from members, non-members, and potential members. Identify opportunities to enhance the members experience and derive value by proposing strategic partnerships and other ideas to solve members’ business problems. Conduct research and connect members with resources and programs to better utilize membership.
  2. Administrative support for the Board of Directors, Continua Council, and elected Officers. This includes planning and scheduling meetings, participating in discussion, answering questions, and keeping meeting minutes. Assists in preparing budget and forecasts.
  3. Payment and invoice processing. Set billing terms. Validate and process vendor invoices according to HIMSS Finance policies. Track expenditures versus budget predictions and manage vendor contract renewals
  4. Event planning and execution. Work with other PCHA team members to plan Continua member events and summits. Includes identifying speakers, scheduling of resources, budget preparation and planning, hotel and venue booking, and preparation of materials for events. Ensures appropriate speakers are on agenda. If necessary, help to represent Continua at tradeshows and other events.
  5. Strategic advice. Provide insights and data regarding membership trends, industry trends, and best practices to inform the strategic planning of the Executive Director and Continua Officers and Board. Effectively communicate ideas via written and oral communications. Develop new member packages and pricing.
  6. Website and communications management. Working together with Continua’s Marketing team, draft, proofread, edit, and distribute various member and non-member communications. This may include updating non-technical web content, working with industry press, and distributing internal communications to members.

Requirements:

  1. Bachelor’s degree in business administration, management, marketing, informatics or in a healthcare-related field; Master’s degree desirable.
  2. A minimum of five (5) years of related work experience preferably in a professional society, trade association, support organization, or in healthcare management
  3. A minimum of two (2) years of experience in healthcare technology including, but not limited to, mobile health (mHealth), clinical informatics, healthcare information management (HIM), consumer electronics or other health IT experience preferred
  4. Technical understanding of a variety of healthcare and Internet technologies including: Bluetooth and other radio technologies; Internet protocols; application architecture (including a very high-level understanding of APIs, RESTful interfaces, etc.); and healthcare interoperability standards (IEEE, HL7, IHE).
  5. Excellent written and verbal communication skills, effective listener, strong teamwork skills, and superior planning skills, both strategic and tactical
  6. Outstanding interpersonal skills with strong personal integrity and the ability to build collaborative relationships thru demonstrated customer relations techniques
  7. Excellent technical skills; skilled in using the Internet, office communication tools (email), word processing, presentations, spreadsheets, databases, and data analysis
  8. Proactive and able to work with minimal supervision as part of a geographically distributed team
  9. Must have a valid passport and be able to travel internationally; up to 10% travel required.

Interested candidates should apply using the HIMSS careers site here.

Make sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

Not subscribed to our blog?

Click here to subscribe!

Footerindesign

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: BERG, LLC

vintage theatre spot light on black curtain with smoke

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where: BERG Health, LLC Framingham, MA

About: Berg focuses our research on understanding how alterations in metabolism relate to disease onset. The company has a deep pipeline of early-stage technologies in CNS diseases and metabolic diseases that complement its late-stage clinical trial activity in cancer and prevention of chemotoxicity.  Armed with use of the Interrogative Biology™ discovery platform that translates biological output into viable therapeutics and a robust biomarker library, Berg is poised to realize its pursuit of a healthier tomorrow

Position: Data Scientist–Healthcare Analytics

The Healthcare Analytics team is seeking a highly motivated, meticulous and detail-oriented individual for a rapidly growing multi-disciplinary team. The candidate will be instrumental in analyzing and making inferences from healthcare big data and must be goal oriented and should have strong background in statistics, epidemiology and possess some programming skills. The candidate should also be a quick learner, extremely flexible and able to adapt to needs of the project.

Responsibilities:

  • Perform meticulous and well thought-out data analysis for hypothesis testing on healthcare big data.
  • Development and execution of data analysis protocols to support company’s discovery pipeline.
  • Detailed documentation of data analysis methods and findings.
  • Presentation of scientific results internally and externally.

Requirements:

  • Requires a Ph.D. or Masters with 5+ years of relevant experience in Statistics, Epidemiology, Public Health, Data Science or related field.
  • Strong skills in statistics and study design.
  • Experience working with healthcare claims, pharmacy and EMR data is a highly desirable.
  • Proficiency in R, MySQL and Perl is preferred.
  • Proven ability to find creative, practical solutions to complex problems.
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills combined with superior and proven track record of technical and organizational skills.
  • Must be able to work in team-oriented environment and demonstrate attention to detail and record keeping.

 

Anyone interested in applying to this position may send their resume, cover letter and three references to hr-68931@berghealth.com.

May sure to reference seeing this position through the Brandeis GPS job spotlight post.

 

Click here to subscribe to our blog!

Footerindesign

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: Meditech

vintage theatre spot light on black curtain with smoke

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where:  Meditech, MA Division (Canton, Foxborough, Framingham, Waltham and Westwood)

About: At Meditech, we believe that healthcare should focus on the patient. That’s why we’re empowering consumers and providers with sophisticated tools like never before. And we’re sharing data, making it useful across hospitals, ambulatory care, home care, hospice, long term care, and behavioral health.

Working ahead of the curve is part of our identity. And we understand that rapid changes in our industry are spurring organizations to transform processes and reexamine how they deliver care. That’s why we’ve redefined what an EHR can do for your patients and your productivity.

Our sophisticated solutions support evidence-based, informed decision making across the continuum. You get the data you need, automatically pushed forward to you on a single, easy-to-use, personalized screen. Access information anywhere, anytime from any web-enabled device. And that’s just the beginning!

Empower your physicians. Seamlessly communicate across all care environments. Put patients at the center of everything you do. Analyze and track the health of your community. Efficiently manage your revenue cycle. Participate in new healthcare delivery models. And partner with a vendor that is always driven to give you the very best.

Meditech will work with you from day one, to ensure that you have all the functionality, resources, and support necessary to meet your organization’s goals—now and for the future. There’s lots to do. Let’s get started.

 

Current Openings

Sales Representative

Marketing Support Representative

Software Developer- SQL

 

If you are interested in any of these positions, please apply directly on the careers website and reference your affiliation with Graduate Professional Studies and the GPS Blog.

 

 

Click here to subscribe to our blog!

Footerindesign

From Registered Nurse to Informatics Analyst

Theresa Harrigan is a graduate from Brandeis Graduate Professional Studies Master of Science in Health and Medical Informatics. She is currently an Informatics Business Analyst for EPIC implementation at Massachusetts General Hospital.

I am atheresa blog photo registered nurse and have worked in health care for more than two decades. If you had asked me 10 years ago if I would be furthering my education, I would likely have said no.  My family and professional life was simply too demanding and I could not imagine myself finding the time to attend classes.  Fast forward a few years and you will find me celebrating the completion of my master’s degree from Brandeis in Health and Medical Informatics.   The online-learning program at Brandeis provided me with the opportunity to expand my knowledge and understanding of health care relative to the application of technology solutions and opened new doors for me. I was able connect with and learn from experienced leaders in the industry in the industry as well as with other students from a wide variety of professional backgrounds and from all over the world. While a student at Brandeis, I discovered new opportunities and pathways for professional growth that I never realized existed.

My professional work continues to evolve and I have become involved in promoting technology solutions as an informatics analyst  aMedizint Massachusetts General Hospital. My mission is to simplify health care for both providers and patients.  Because of my educational experience and the knowledge gained, I believe I will be able to make a direct contribution to improving patient care outcomes and the delivery of health care.

Click here to subscribe to our blog!

Footerindesign

What you missed at the Analytics 360 Symposium

By Ariel Garber

Brandeis Graduate Professional Studies hosted the Analytics 360 Symposium on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at Brandeis University. The symposium took a look at using analytics to guide strategic, operational and tactical decisions specifically in the areas of education, healthcare and business.

The sessions covered a wide range perspectives within the analytics field, from The Open Data Analytics Initiative, to 10 Steps to Tracking Engagement and Influence Online, to A Holistic Approach to Being Data Science Driven.

The keynote speaker was Dr. Robert Carver, award-winning Professor of Business Administration at Stonehill College as well as Adjunct Professor at the International
Business School at Brandeis University.Dr. Rob CarverOther sessions included The Application of Analytics in the Student’s Academic Lifecycle session led by Leanne Bateman, Faculty Chair for Strategic Analytics at Brandeis University and Principal Consultant for Beacon Strategy Group, a Boston-based management firm specializing in project management services.

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 2.25.35 PMOther speakers, including professors, leading executives, and researchers, focused on topics such as publicity, e-learning, and big data. Alan Girelli spoke on The Open Data Analytics Initiative, with a comparative discussion of Learning Analytics (a link to his presentation is available here). Girelli is the Director of the Center for Innovation and Excellence in eLearning (CIEE) and has taught online, on-ground, and blended writing and instructional design courses at the graduate and undergraduate level for UMass Boston, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and ITT Technologies.

Screen Shot 2015-04-30 at 1.37.23 PM

We want to extend a big thank you to our panelists, Rob Carver, Leanne Bateman, David Dietrich, Shlomi Dinoor, Alan Girelli, Haijing Hao, and John McDougall. The event was sponsored by Basho, Soft10, Brandeis International Business School, EMC and E-Learning Innovation.

Thank you end Pic

Click here to subscribe to our blog!

Footerindesign

Analytics: Not Just For Data Experts

By Ariel Garber

Analytics is useful in any profession, with the potential to increase efficiency, profitability and accuracy. From healthcare, to marketing, to even sports, analytics is becoming an essential tool in all fields. Here’s a sneak peak into how data affects more industries that you expect.

Technology is shaping a new health care economy, evident in the advances of Stethoscopemobile devices, cloud computing and analytics. “‘We need to empower consumers with the in-the-moment guidance they need,’” said Dennis Schmuland, MD, Microsoft’s chief health strategy officer, “adding that a key technological component of that on both sides of the patient-provider equation is health analytics, thus the need to ‘make analytics easy for everyone.’”

Social media Picture1and marketing analytics tools are also important as social media becomes essential in all fields. Research has shown that “the conversations your customers have among themselves drive about 13 percent of business decisions and can amplify your advertising by 15 percent.

Sports analytics are valuable to both consumers and professionals, for the way we consume sports industry through sports data is dependent upon analytics. “Sports analytics is not just a catch phrase, but an influential part of the future of sports,” said Bloomberg Sports, the leading global provider in data and analytics, “We believe sports analytics plays an integral role in the future of sport, both at a fan engagement and elite sport performance level.” Bloomberg Sports offers a variety of resources to both consumers and professionals. For professional purposes, they provide analytic tools for scouting, video analysis and “player-centric applications to assess performances and aid the preparation of upcoming games.” They also have created a predictive analytics program and use their own broadcast and TV stations to “translate analytics-rich content into broadcast tools used on-air to inform and educate viewers.” They also host their own website, StatsInsights.com, featuring analytics-rich sports articles.

Big data is becoming incorporated into all aspects of sports, from devices that can track pitches during the game, to wearable technology. Adidas’ miCoach system collects data from a device attached to the player’s jersey that shows the top performers and who is tired, as well as “real-time stats on each player, such as speed, heart rate and acceleration.” The data from these devices assists trainers, coaches, and physicians in planning better training and conditioning.

There is also a demand for data analytics specialists to translate the data from these devices in a coherent manner for the players and coaches. Moneyball, a 2003 book and 2011 movie featured the Oakland Athletics competitive baseball that utilized analytics in their data-driven strategies. This highlights a shift in sports from gut instincts to a reliance upon science. Analytics is “gaining recognition as a tried and true instrument for competitive advantage in countless industries.”

Brandeis Graduate Professional Studies offers a Strategic Analytics program that produces professionals who understand the strategic potential of big-data analytics and who can translate analysis into effective organizational decision-making, poised to lead today’s organizations to new standards of efficiency and competitiveness.

Brandeis GPS is hosting an Analytics 360 Symposium on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 from 9am-4:30pm at Hassenfeld Conference Center of Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts.

360LogoALT2The day-long symposium will focus on promoting a discussion of the growing field of analytics and how organizations can leverage big data to make more strategic decisions. Panelists will engage in a conversation that places analytics in the context of big data, education, health, marketing and business.

Register here for the Analytics 360 Symposium on April 8, 2015 at Brandeis University. The cost for NERCOMP members is $135 and the cost for non-members is $265. Submit this form to learn more about special pricing available to members of the Brandeis community. For more information, email analytics360@brandeis.edu or call 781-736-8786. You can also find us on Twitter using #GPSAnalytics.

Click here to subscribe to our blog!

Footerindesign

Analytics 360 Symposium

360LogoHorizontalStyle

Written by: Ariel Garber

Brandeis Graduate Professional Studies will host the Analytics 360 Symposium: Multi-Industry Insights into Data and Intelligence on April 8, 2015 from 8:30am to 4:00 pm at Hassenfeld Conference Center of Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. The all-day symposium will focus on promoting a discussion of the growing field of analytics and how organizations can leverage big data to make more strategic decisions.

Panelists will engage in a conversation that places analytics in the context of big data, education, health, marketing and business. Sessions cover a wide range perspectives within the analytics field, from  The Open Data Analytics Initiativeto 10 Steps to Tracking Engagement and Influence Online, to A Holistic Approach to Being Data Science Driven.

The keynote speaker, Dr. Robert Carver, is an award-winning Professor of Business Administration at Stonehill College as well as Adjunct Professor at the International Business School at Brandeis University. Dr. Carver specializes in applied quantitative methods, big data, statistics education and business analytics. He will speak on the ethical dilemmas of big data in analytics.

marketing-sales-presentationsOther sessions include The Application of Analytics in the Student’s Academic Lifecycle session led by Leanne Bateman, Faculty Chair for Strategic Analytics at Brandeis University and Principal Consultant for Beacon Strategy Group, a Boston-based management firm specializing in project management services. Other speakers, including professors, leading executives, and researchers, will focus on topics such as publicity, e-learning, and big data.

Register here for the Analytics 360 Symposium on April 8, 2015 at Brandeis University. The cost for NERCOMP members is $135 and the cost for non-members is $265. Submit this form to learn more about special pricing available to members of the Brandeis community. For more information, email analytics360@brandeis.edu or call 781-736-8786. You can also find us on Twitter using #GPSAnalytics.

Click here to subscribe to our blog!

Footerindesign

How Companies Can Use Big Data to Make Better Decisions

By:  – Associate Editor, BostInno

Big Data has swiftly earned a lasting place in our lexicon, because its potential is real and impact undeniable. Companies can collectively scoff and brush big data off as just another trend, but that decision could lead to worse decisions down the road.

how-predictive-analytics-can-make-money-for-social-networks-46ce73d0c0“Every era has a bold new innovation that emerges as a defining advantage for those who get out ahead of the curve,” said Ali Riaz, CEO of enterprise software company Attivio, referencing the industrial revolution and, later, the information age. Giants of industry who took advantage of new machinery or market leaders who learned to leverage relational databases have historically had the upperhand.

“Today’s advantage — the new currency, if you will — is big data,” Riaz added. “Companies that don’t get ahead of this tsunami by using big data to their advantage will be crushed by it.”

Yet, this deluge of data isn’t new, it’s just been given a catchy two-word title.

When asked to define big data, Ely Kahn, co-founder and VP of business development for big data start-up Sqrrl, described it as massive amounts — tera- and petabytes’ worth — of unstructured and semi-structured data “organizations have historically been unable to analyze because it was too expensive or difficult.” With technologies like Hadoop and NoSQL databases surfacing, however, Kahn claimed those same organizations can now make sense of this type of data “cost effectively.”

To Marilyn Matz, CEO of fellow big data startup Paradigm4, the revolution goes beyond just high volumes of information, though.

“It is about integrating and analyzing data collected from new sources,” Matz said. “A central capability this enables is hyper-personalization and micro-targeting — including recommendation engines, location-based services and offers, personalized pricing,
precision medicine
and predictive equipment maintenance schedules.”

No matter the industry, big data has a key role to play in moving the needle for companies,mobile-app whether large or small. And that goes for companies currently unable to determine what their “big data” is. The unrecognizable could be customer sentiment in social media, server logs or clickstream data.

“Once you have identified untapped sources of data,” Kahn said, “you can use tools like Hadoop and NoSQL to analyze it.”

Matz broke down, by industry, what that ability to analyze could mean.

In the Commercial Sphere

In the commercial sphere, if a company knows 10 or 100 things about you and your situational context, then that company can do a far better job offering you something relevant to exactly where you are and what you might be interested in, increasing their opportunity to capture your respect, attention and dollars.

In the Industrial World

In the industrial world, if a manufacturing company knows where equipment is operated (hot and harsh climates versus moderate climates), as well as how that equipment is being used (lots of hard-braking) and collects data across a large fleet, then it can predict maintenance before costly breakdowns, saving millions of dollars — and it can price warranties more accurately, as well as improve designs and manufacturing processes.

In Pharma and Healthcare

In pharma and healthcare, evidence-based outcome studies that integrate genomic data, phenotypic data, clinical data, behavioral data, daily sensor data, et al., can lead to more targeted and effective treatment and outcomes for both wellness and illness.

Attivio has been using big data in one of the most vital ways by focusing on detecting military personnel who are at risk for suicide.

But, of course, big data still comes with challenges. Riaz acknowledged the reality, which is that every large organization is comprised of disconnected silos of information that come in all different formats; let alone the various business units, applications, protocols, information repositories, terminologies and schemas that doesn’t always mesh.

program-hero-strategic-analytics“Just dumping data into these unorganized but separate systems is anarchy and an egregious waste of time and money,” Riaz said. “Yet, this is how many technologies address the problem. It essentially just creates another big silo for the information to live in.”

Moving forward, additional ways to combine structured and unstructured data, as well as merge data from within an enterprise to data from outside of it, will need to emerge. And when it does, the impact will be glaringly obvious.

As Riaz posited:

The time to solve big problems with extreme information is upon us. Businesses, organizations and governments are putting a lot of faith – and money – into technology solutions to help them make sense of it all. As a technology industry, we owe it to these companies to deliver real products that deliver real results to real problems, not just create more work.

So, let’s start by making that first big decision: Understanding big data’s importance, no matter how big of a buzzword it’s become.

Click here to subscribe to our blog!

Footerindesign

The Luxury of Less

by: Katherine S Rowell author of “The Best Boring Book Ever of Select Healthcare Classification Systems and Databases” available now!

Originally posted here

I often find myself torn between wanting to get as much useful information as possible onto a single page of the reports and dashboards we design and build, and my love of white space, or “The Luxury of Less.” In a page lay-out, white space (also called “negative space”) is the portion of a page deliberately left unmarked. When well chosen and placed, it is a key contributor to attractive, effective design. Done poorly, it can make a page appear incomplete or even pretentiously minimal.

Consider the following example of the potential power of white space, illustrated by Edward Tufte’s redesign of a table of cancer survival statistics.

Original Table:

Source: Hermann Brenner, "Long-term survival rates of cancer patient[s] achieved by the end of the 20th century; a period analysis," The Lancet, 360 (October 12, 2002), 1131-1135.

Tufte First Iteration Table Redesign:

Source: Edward Tufte

Second Table-Graph Iteration:

Source: Edward Tufte

The original table, which is similar to the ones we are accustomed to seeing in scientific publications, is ordered by body system and is perfectly adequate for the look-up and comparison of values, including details about the Standard Error (SE) of each value-that is, it serves its purpose. But could it be improved?

Tufte’s first redesign highlights a particular (and newly featured) aspect of the data: five-year survival rates by type of cancer. Notice how each row in this re-done table has a bit more white space: heavy black lines framing the titles and column-headings, and parentheses around the standard errors, have been removed, giving some visual respite and making the figures more legible. The re-categorization of the data also makes a trend it illustrates somewhat easier to spot (take a minute to look at the information in the first column and follow it across; you’ll see it). The entire table looks and feels cleaner, and especially for research publications that require reporting and display of all relevant statistics, this table redesign works very well.

The third table-graphic-a hybrid of the two forms-provides yet another view, and a different data-visualization lesson. It presents the viewer with a clear picture of survival time gradients, illustrating the slope of survival rates for each type of cancer. In this last table-graphic, there is an even greater use of white space, and every visual element contributes directly to understanding-simply, elegantly, clearly. The use of space coupled with a line to show the slope of change leaves no doubt about the story in the data.

Although I see no compelling reason why a view like this couldn’t be used in a research publication (adding back in the standard errors), this is of course wishful thinking on my part: it simply won’t happen any time soon. What isn’t wishful thinking, however, is that we have immediate opportunities to use these techniques to build the tables and other displays we create for our clients, supervisors, and colleagues. We can most certainly use them to simplify and clarify information for patients and the general public, too.

Bottom line? Tufte reminds us yet again of the power of simplicity, and that showing less often reveals so much more.

Untitled-1

 

 

 

 

 

Footerindesign

« Older posts

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)