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Tag: masters (page 2 of 2)

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: MathWorks

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SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Where:  Mathworks, 3 Apple Hill Drive, Natick, MA 01760

About: Founded in 1984 and privately held, Mathworks is the leading developer of mathematical computing software. Engineers and scientists worldwide rely on its products to accelerate the pace of discovery, innovation, and development.

MATLAB and Simulink, two products developed by Mathworks, are used throughout the automotive, aerospace, communications, electronics, and industrial automation industries as fundamental tools for research and development. They are also used for modeling and simulation in increasingly technical fields, such as financial services and computational biology. MATLAB and Simulink enable the design and development of a wide range of advanced products, including automotive systems, aerospace flight control and avionics, telecommunications and other electronics equipment, industrial machinery, and medical devices. More than 5000 colleges and universities around the world use MATLAB and Simulink for teaching and research in a broad range of technical disciplines.

Mathworks employs over 3000 people, with 30% located outside of the US.

Position: Senior Software Program Manager

As a Sr. Software Program Manager on the MATLAB Team, you will be part of a highly skilled, dedicated team focused on delivering challenging, high value programs. You will join a growing team that nurtures individual growth, appreciates diversity, encourages initiative, values teamwork, shares success, and rewards excellence.
Responsibilities

The Software Program Manager is a member of the software development management team and supports the planning and execution of multiple projects or programs in support of the continuing evolution of our flagship product, MATLAB. Responsibilities include:
•Partnering with extended software development teams to help them plan, track and execute complex, cross organizational programs while maintaining focus on building the right things at the highest levels of quality.
•Performing program analysis, manage risk, identify and influence necessary course corrections, creatively solve problems, and communicate program status and activities across multiple levels of management.
•Continuously assessing and improving the processes that comprise the software development lifecycle and mentor/coach other members of the Program Management and Product Development Teams.

Position Qualifications:
Minimum
•A bachelor’s degree and 3 years of professional work experience (or a master’s degree) is required.

Additional
•Experience in developing commercial software products
•Outgoing, highly organized, persistent, and tenacious; able to deal with uncertainty and change
•Ability to influence others in order to get things done, even when you have no direct line of authority over them.
•Expertise in providing cross-organizational management of software development programs from initiation through delivery
•Hands-on experience with developing and reporting on metrics for engineering development, test development and execution, bugs, issues, risks, and other aspects of project and program management
•Experience with MATLAB Products

If you are interested in this position, please submit your resume and CV to:

Erin Seiden

erin.seiden@mathworks.com

508-647-2280

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SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS: Brandeis GPS

vintage theatre spot light on black curtain with smoke

SPOTLIGHT ON JOBS

Members of the Brandeis GPS Community may submit job postings from within their industries to advertise exclusively to our community. This is a great way to further connect and seek out opportunities as they come up. If you are interested in posting an opportunity, please complete the following form found here.

Title:  Adjunct Instructor

Where:  Graduate Professional Studies, Brandeis University

Graduate Professional Studies (GPS) welcomes applications for its adjunct faculty pool on an ongoing basis.  As a general rule, our adjunct faculty have earned a master’s degree and many hold additional academic degrees and industry-specific credentials.  They have professional expertise which they bring to the online class discussions.

Our 10-week courses are taught fully online, with no set days or times for interaction.  Previous experience teaching online is not required; GPS offers a comprehensive training program for qualified instructors.

If you would like to be considered, please review our part-time applied master’s degree programs and submit an application, which includes an uploaded current resume or CV.

Brandeis University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. It is the policy of Brandeis University not to discriminate against any applicant or employee on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, genetic information, national origin, veteran status, or disability. We encourage women, persons with disabilities, and veterans to apply.

Current Openings

Adjunct Instructor, User-Centered Design

Adjunct Instructor, Digital Marketing and Design

Adjunct Instructor, Strategic Analytics

If you are interested in teaching for GPS, either in one of the course clusters listed above or in another GPS program area, please:

  1. Review our GPS Adjunct Instructor qualifications.
  2. Explore our Programs and Courses and our individual course descriptions.
  3. Complete an application, being sure to specify your particular program or course(s) of interest.
  4. We will contact you should any related positions become available.

Companies Our Faculty Represent

As industry leaders and active professionals within their areas of expertise, our adjunct faculty hold positions or have served as consultants at leading organizations, including the following:

Companies Our Faculty Represent
Amgen Fidelity Investments
AMR Research Harvard Medical School
Babson Capital Management LLC IBM
Biogen Idec Novartis
Comprehensive Power Inc. Pfizer, Inc.
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Raytheon
EMC Schrodinger, Inc.
EMD Serono Shire Human Genetic Therapies
Sun Microsystems

 

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One mistake presenters should never make and 8 strategies to avoid it

by: Lisa Nielsen

Whether workshops, panels, keynotes, or classes there is one mistake presenters should never make. It is a mistake I learned to never ever do from a wise lady early in my career. I’ve heeded this advice and seen the negative ramifications of those who do not. Ramifications such as a frustrated, unsatisfied, and anxious audience as well as less than favorable reviews and feedback. Additionally, when presenters, don’t heed this advice, the chances of their audience incorporating what they’ve learned into their work, decreases.

Fortunately, if you remember this one piece of advice, your future presentations will be brighter and your audience will leave more satisfied.

The advice is…

Always make sure your audience feel “they have everything they need to be successful.”

Presenters fail when they say things like:

  • “We have a lot to get through today.”
  • “I am speaking quickly so we have time to cover everything.”
  • “We’re already behind schedule.”
  • “In the interest of time…”

Or do thinks like:

  • Require participants to take down everything you say, because you haven’t provided it to them. They’re focused on the low level task of copying, instead of the higher level thinking of making meaning.
  • Not provide a detailed, timed agenda that could be turn-keyed.
  • Not tell up front and remind participants in the middle and end what goals are and that they are making strides in accomplishing the goals of the session.
  1. Build in extra time at the beginning
    Start out by putting your audience at ease. Create a collegial atmosphere as folks arrive. Perhaps a simple do/now ice breaker where you ask participants to talk to the people around them and find out what they hoped to get out of the day. This gets minds flowing and allows for a relaxed start with a networked room.
  2. Plan for latecomers  
    Latecomers can throw off and delay a presentation. When you address the audience ask them to be the ones to fill in a latecomer should they sit next to them and let them know what to share.
  3. Provide ALL materials
    Speaking of what to share, keep it simple. Create a link where participants can access EVERYTHING you’ve shared. This way they don’t worry about missing anything and you don’t have to worry if they didn’t get something down.
  4. Ensure Materials Can Be Re-purposed Don’t share materials in PDF. Don’t give access without copy ability. Provide materials to participants so that it is easy for them to make their own, customize, and bring back to their work. This is a wonderful gift for teachers (time!) and students (great new learning materials).
  5. Smart Name Tags
    You know that link I mentioned above? Don’t worry about saying it over and over or having to keep putting it back on the projector. Provide name tags or cards with all the information participants will need i.e. a link to the presentation, Twitter hashtag, how to connect to the internet, etc. This way, the answer to every question is “It’s on your name tag.”
  6. Sum up the learning
    At the end of your time share all the new things participants will be able to do as a result of your time together. This way you’re focusing on what they have learned. The audience is assured that they got what they came for out of your time together.
  7. Take backs
    Ask participants to share (verbally or via Twitter, text, post it) in 140 characters or less one thing they’ll take back to their work. This reinforces their learning.
  8. Use reassuring statements
    Let the audience you know you are right on track with statements like:
    • “After our time together you’ll know exactly how to…”
    • “We are right on time.”
  9. Have two plans
    Have one plan if the class moves slowly. Have an additional plan if they move quickly. If they do, let them know that they were so on point they get bonus learning. If they move slowly, they’ll still know exactly what you told them they would learn.

So what do you think? Have you experienced presenters who try to rush through information? Have any of these strategies worked for you? Are these strategies you would try when you present?

 LisaNielsonPic
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My Student Experience

by: Rebecca Weiss

I cannot believe the term is already over! While it seems like these past ten weeks flew by, program-hero-strategic-analyticsI can remember there still being so much snow on the ground the first week and now we finally have beautiful weather outside.

This was my first course with GPS as well as my first graduate course since I graduated from undergrad at Brandeis almost two years ago, so it certainly was an exciting new experience. I was enrolled in Foundations of Data Science and Analytics, one of the required courses for the newest master’s program, Strategic Analytics. I was definitely intimidated when I first began, as an Enrollment Advisor at Brandeis, I had very little formal experience working with analytics. I found as I worked through the course, I could apply the principles I learned into many facets of my day-to-day job and the operations of the university as a whole. Our instructor, Leanne Bateman, was great at making sure we related each week’s discussion back to our own experiences at work. I particularly enjoyed one of our assignments where we had to write a job description for a data scientist in our own office.

CoffeeShopIt was an adjustment to get back into the mindset of doing schoolwork. My first week I left all of my reading and videos for Saturday afternoon and I sat in Starbucks for almost 8 hours! But after the first few weeks, I got into a rhythm of setting out times on particular days to do readings and postings.  After these ten weeks, I am very glad that I took the course and I think it will greatly benefit me at work. I plan on taking the summer off, but maybe I will enroll in my second GPS course in the fall!

 

About the Author:

Rebecca Weiss graduated from Brandeis University in 2012 with a Bachelor of Arts in Politics and Sociology. Currently, she works with Brandeis Graduate Professional Studies as an Enrollment Advisor.

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