Tag: Choosing the Right Graduate Program (page 1 of 2)

Quiz: Which one of our programs is right for you?

What color are you? (Purple) If you were a pizza topping, what would it be? (Olives) What gemstone fits your personality? (Emerald) As a kid, I was absolutely obsessed with taking personality quizzes. From Buzzfeed to Seventeen magazine, there wasn’t a quiz that I wouldn’t take. Well, the time has come for me to make my own quiz to help you decide which of Heller’s programs is the best fit for you. Like any responsible quizmaker, let me get a quick disclaimer out of the way: this quiz is just for fun, so don’t take your results too seriously. Okay, now that that’s out of the way, grab a pen and paper to write down your answers. At the end, the letter you chose the most will give you your results. Ready? Here we go!

Which classes sound the most interesting to you?

a) Diversity, Inclusion and Equity in Social Policy; Policy Advocacy, Protest, and Community Organizing;  LGBTQ+ Justice: A History of Pride, Prejudice, and Policy in the United States

b) Social Justice, Management and Policy; Managing the Triple Bottom Line; Leadership and Organizational Behavior

c) Principles of Ecology for Development Practitioners; Environmental Justice and the Human Effects of Climate Change; Gender and Development in the Context of Neoliberalism and Globalization

d) Development, Aid and Coexistence; Kingian Nonviolence and Reconciliation; Women, Peacemaking, and Peacebuilding

e) Intersectionality and Bioethics; Microeconomics in Global Health; Management of Health Care Organizations

f) Foundations of Social Theory: From the Early Twentieth Century to Critical Race Theory; Economic Theory and Social Policy

Which of these words most appeals to you?

a) Strategy

b) Influence

c) Growth

d) Balance

e) Health

f) Research

Which job(s) would you most like to have?

a) Director of Communications for a local politician; Program Manager for a non-profit that benefits LGBTQ+ youth; Town Administrator for your hometown

b) CEO of a sustainable athletic line; Senior Analyst for an impact investing non-profit; Sustainability Consultant for a for-profit company

c) Director of Development and Operations for an NGO; U.S. Foreign Service Officer;  International Trade Advisor for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

d)  Associate Reporting Officer for the United Nations; First Secretary for an Embassy; the Communications and Operations Manager for an international NGO

e) CDC Public Health Advisor; Program Analyst for the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; Immunization Technical Consultant for an International Vaccine Access Center of a hospital

f)  Scientist for a research institute at a college; Director for a Center for Policy Research; Director of research for a thinktank

How would your friends describe you?

a) Analytical, practical, driven

b) Entrepreneurial, innovative, energetic

c) Creative, adaptable, passionate

d) Patient, empathetic, good listener

e) Problem solver, responsible, systematic

f) Thoughtful, dedicated, methodical

What reading would you find most interesting?

a) The New Jim Crow, by Michelle Alexander

b) Changing Business from the Inside Out, by Timothy J Mohin

c) Ten Reasons Not to Measure Impact –and What to do Instead, by Mary Kay Gugerty and Dean Karlan.

d) BIASED, Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do, by Jennifer L. Eberhardt, PhD.

e) When Things Go Wrong: How Health Care Organizations Deal With Major Failures, by Walshe & Shortell,

f)  Qui Bono? – Explaining – or Defending – Winners and Losers in the Competition for Educational Achievement, by llen et al .

 

——————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Mostly As: Master of Public Policy

Mostly Bs: Social Impact MBA

Mostly Cs: MA in Sustainable International Development

Mostly Ds: MA in Conflict Resolution and Coexistence

Mostly Es: MS in Global Health Policy and Management

Mostly Fs: PhD in Social Policy

Love is Blind: Admissions

Like many others across the nation (and even the world: there’s now both a Japanese and Brazilian version), I spent a good portion of last month binge-watching season two of Netflix’s hit show Love is Blind, and tuned in this past week for the reunion episode. For those of you unfamiliar with the premise of the show, it goes a little something like this: over less than two weeks, potential couples participate in a version of speed dating where they can hear, but not see each other. By the end of the pod dates, some couples choose to get engaged, if accepted, the two will meet face to face for the first time. The show then follows them out of the pods to their honeymoon, and then back to real life where they meet each other’s friends and families. At the end of three weeks, they then decide if they want to get married or not.

Okay, Amanda, what’s your point? I’m getting there! The show has been very much on my mind, and we happen to be at the point of the admissions cycle where we’re both still admitting students and trying to yield the students we’ve already admitted this cycle… and when I sat down to write this blog post, I realized that in admissions, we often use words like “perfect match”, a “good fit”, or “knowing in your gut”, the same things people often talk about when they’re dating. It got me wondering if Love is Blind just may have some important lessons for students in the process of applying to grad school. Here are some of my takeaways:

Love, whether it’s for a graduate school or a romantic partner, can (and maybe should!) be blind. In the pods, contestants are challenged to fall in love without knowing what the other person looks like. When exploring schools, or choosing the right school for you, I implore you to try to do the same. Strip away the prestigious name or the high ranking, look past how other people might judge you for your choice and ask yourself, how do I feel here? Does the environment feel right to me? Do this school’s values mesh with mine? Could I see myself fitting into this community? Those questions, more than a flashy name, will help you choose which school is the best fit for you.

These things take time. Couples that seem like the strongest in the pods often fall apart after a week in the outside world. All the bonding that they do through the walls amounts to very little when they’re confronted with each other’s families, friends, apartments, conflict styles, love languages, etc. Unfortunately, there’s no shortcut to love, and I suspect there may not be a shortcut to finding the right graduate school. It takes careful research, meeting with people in the community, a visit to campus (if possible!) to figure out if the school might be the right one for you. Don’t try to rush into things!

There’s no such thing as “The One”. Something I was struck by in Love is Blind is how frequently contestants will say something like, “I never connect with people outside… but in here, I have three guys that I could see as my future husband!” I think that goes to show that the myth of one soulmate or one perfect school may just be that… a myth! There are probably a few dozen schools that you could be happy at, so don’t take rejection too hard. Even if you don’t get into what you think is your dream school, it may just be that there’s another school out there that you would ultimately be more suited for.

While I don’t think Love is Blind is necessarily the best way to find a romantic partner, I think there are some takeaways that are actually better applied to graduate admissions. But worry not– you don’t have to enter into a pod to see if Heller is right for you.

Why Study Public Policy?

Daniella Levine, MPP ’22

As I sit here, almost at the halfway point of my last semester at Heller, I cannot help but reflect on my experience. Instead of a sappy and sentimental post that I can feel bubbling to the top, I want to focus on the structure of the Heller MPP program and why this remains the right choice for me from an academic prospective.

To do so, I decided to go back to my statement of purpose. I wanted to see what I asked of Heller three years ago when I submitted my initial application and hold both Heller and myself accountable. Did we both accomplish what we set out to do?

“I have come to understand how little untrained professionals understand of the complexities of community work, which is the reason I am applying to your MPP program.”

After five years in a direct service role, I was ready to go back to school to enhance my skills. I had reached the limit of what I could do without further instruction and guidance, and knew that the best way for me to attain those skills was through a higher education degree. The work is multilayered and I wanted to garner the expertise to avoid burnout and frustration.

“What I am seeking is not just to mend the wounds caused by imbalance and injustice, but rather to learn how to identify, combat, and work to prevent these systemic injustices from taking root.” 

It took me a few years to confirm that an MPP was the right educational track. I played with the idea of an MSW or an MBA – but in the end, I knew the work I wanted to do was deeply  rooted in the policy realm.  I kept coming back to the old proverb: If you give a man a fish, he eats for a day. If you teach a man to fish, he eats for life. We need to address the systemic issues at play to ensure this man is fed everyday. A public policy degree provides the infrastructure for how to assimilate successfully into a policy-specific role in order to impart change.

“The ability to combine the MPP with a concentration in gender policy allows me to develop the skill-base necessary to impact a niche field. […] I want to explore the intersection of assimilation, gender, and the cultural socialization on gender normativity. I can study gender through a sociological or historical lens, but both paths feel too passive and retroactive.”

Heller’s academic structure encourages students to specialize in a specific area of policy. The program is constructed in such a way that each student receives an interdisciplinary education. I would not understand the intricacies of social policy without the integration of gender and race into the conversation. Heller not only promotes those conversations, but uplifts diversity as one of the school’s core tenants.

“Heller’s field experience opportunities and small class sizes are ideal as I have always been a tactile learner. Your program is the perfect mixture of purposeful work combined with the quantitative training necessary to make a difference locally and beyond.”

The class load, requirements, and design match my learning style and challenge me to be the best student I can be. Although I was initially afraid of the quantitative materials, I have found the work to be digestible and accessible. Each class is carefully thought out to ensure that each student graduate with the essential tools to excel in the public policy field.

“Heller offers me the chance to explore public policy in a community I have called home for the last five years with my desired educational track.”

Whether you are a transplant to Boston or a life-long New Englander, Heller is strategically located in a unique political arena. From local issues to national recognition, the Greater Boston area offers a plethora of avenues to explore the complexities of policy up close. With renowned research institutes and access to practitioners at the top of their field, you cannot beat the exposure Heller offers.

Financing Graduate School as a First Generation Graduate Student

Ronunique Clark headshot

Ronunique Clark, MPP’23

The feeling you get when you receive your offer into the graduate school of your choice is undeniably one of the best feelings ever! You may have been working on your application for months, recommenders may have bailed out on you, the personal statement began to look like a blur after too many rewrites, but you finished it, submitted it, and got in. The next order of business is always “so how will I pay for this?” This can be answered in many ways, but for now, I will just offer my own two cents.

For me, I was lucky enough to leave my undergraduate institution with minimal student debt because I was granted a full scholarship. However, unlike undergrad, I knew that it would be difficult to secure sufficient funding in grad school. When I started my grad school application process, I would search the websites to determine how schools would disburse financial aid. Heller usually offers at least a 30-50% merit scholarship to most students applying to their programs, though some programs may offer more. This was a green flag for me when applying because it showed that Heller did not want students to unnecessarily worry about the financial part, but to come in and be able to learn without the additional stress.

A few things I learned when seeking funding for grad school: First, I learned when searching for funding, you need to be specific in your wording. I would recommend searching for “scholarships for public policy students” or “scholarships for graduate students”, which would narrow the information down to my particular request, avoiding the disappointment that comes with finding a great scholarship only to see in the description, “this is only for undergraduate students only”.

Second, I live by the saying “closed mouths do not get fed” and from this, I took the initiative to reach out to my mentors, former supervisors, or programs that I worked/volunteered for. This can be helpful because many jobs or programs have funding to support individuals’ academic efforts. Sometimes these can be free without any additional requirements, or you may have to fill out an application and work out a system to receive the funds. If you do not advocate for yourself and your work ethic, then who will?

Lastly,  working and going to school can be difficult. I found full-time or part-time work-study jobs to be beneficial. Note that most schools do not offer work-study for graduate students, especially international students. But even if it is not work-study, some on-campus jobs are able to hire students directly to their payroll if the department allows for it.  I advocate for on-campus or work-study employment because they work the best with students’ academic schedules, and they also are able to provide support and resources, and you may be able to score a job that fits your academic interests.

Seeking funding for graduate school can be rough, but it does not have to be. Always reach out to the school of your choice and see what resources they provide to graduate students; if you do not ask, then you will never know. This information is sometimes public but not always, so it is important to really advocate for yourself and your needs when you’re applying, during your time in the program, and even after you graduate.

Applying to Graduate School as a First Generation Graduate Student

Ronunique Clark headshot

Ronunique Clark, MPP’23

Applying to graduate school as a first generation graduate student is not always as easy as it may seem.  When I started my senior year at Boston University, I was on the pathway to become a law student. I spent all summer and most of fall prepping for the LSAT, deciding what schools I wanted to apply to, endless amount of GroupMe messages… it was all super draining.  Yet when it came time to write my personal statement I could not find the words to say why I wanted to be an attorney. Was it because I wanted to help my community? Was it because I will be financially stable? What was it? I spent the last  two years prepping for my journey into law school and now I can’t even say why I want to be there. I think I was turned off by the law school process. I did not understand the purpose of the LSAT when all the 1L and 2L says the LSAT has barely anything to do with your classes. I did not understand why I would choose to sit in a class discussing outdated laws. I did not understand the process for the bar exam. It all just seemed like a rigged system to me and I no longer wanted any part.

Once I officially decided that law school was not for me, I was right back to the drawing board. Well, what am I supposed to do now? I was set to graduate from BU in less than 5 months and I just shut the door on what I thought was my dream career. I remember speaking with a old supervisor of mine about my concerns: I told her I knew I wanted to help people but I wanted to make a everlasting impact, I wanted to be within the community making the changes they want to see, and that I was thinking of applying for a MPP or MPA degree. She told me it sounded like a great idea and if she could had gotten her MPP or MPA instead of law school she would have 1000% done it. She said to me, “I did not want to study law I wanted to learn the legal and government system to make it better.” From that statement alone I began thinking some more about my personal goals and the field I saw myself in. Once that became clear, I began my search for masters programs.  I had few goals for this new journey: find a master’s program that did not require the GRE (hey, what can I say I was burnt out from standardized testing), only apply for 5 schools, and secure a scholarship offer.

One thing I forgot about once I narrowed down my choices and began my application process was that in undergrad I had way more assistance. I had more time to polish my personal statement, I had more time to search for schools, I had more time to submit scholarship applications, and on top of that, I was chosen as a Posse Scholar, and they pretty much do all the work for you– all I did was show up to an interview and a few meetings. I was on a time crunch submitting grad school apps, finding recommenders, and submitting scholarship essays. Not only did I have to deal with being on a time crunch, I had to deal with the most hated question of college students, “What are you doing after you graduate?” I would answer, “Grad school” only to receive responses such as, “Why would you want to go to grad school right after undergrad?”, “What do you plan to do with a second degree?”, questions I honestly did not have the answer to and probably still don’t have the answer to.  However, my mentor, my posse, my friends, and my family where all very supportive of my decision to get my masters. They always wanted me to do what made me happy and I can not thank them enough for the support. Friends offered to read my statement of purposes, people always asked for updates and when acceptances letters came in I was showered with words of wisdom and encouragement. Most of my family never went to college and sometimes its hard for them to understand the challenges I have to face, but they never doubted my ability to finish strong. One piece of advice I want to give a first generation graduate student is that breaking generational curses starts with you and even when the road looks foggy, trust the light is always at the end.

Things to think about when choosing a graduate program (that might not be immediately obvious)

Man in plaid shirt smiling at camera

Doug Nevins BA ’11, MPP ’21

As I near the end of my time at Heller, I’ve reflected a bit on the criteria I had when I was applying to and choosing graduate programs, and on how my impressions of Heller have played out during my time here. I wanted to share a few criteria that I considered and discuss in a bit more detail how these factored into my search.

Faculty background

I was drawn to the fact that many Heller faculty serve as researchers in various centers and institutes here on campus, while many also have experience working in federal or state agencies related to health, labor, education, and other social policy areas. Knowing that core courses would be taught by faculty with backgrounds specific to social policy, and with policy-relevant work and research experience regardless of their formal academic training, was a big priority for me, and made Heller a compelling option. My primary interests are education and workforce development, and I’ve gotten to work with faculty who have served in the Department of Labor and managed national job training non-profit organizations. Heller has enabled me to delve deeply into topics of interest in both required classes and electives.

Geography and professional connections

My sense is that many policy schools excel at connecting students to jobs in Washington, DC, as well as in the area where they are located. This motivated me to consider Heller, since I am from the Boston area and interested in opportunities here, as well as DC, where there are of course more jobs in the federal government and in national-level policy organizations. That said, Heller places students around the country and abroad, which I viewed as an additional advantage to attending graduate school here – I’ve made connections with peers and with faculty who themselves have connections in many different locations.

Peer interests

In addition to faculty at Heller tending to have direct professional and research experience in social policy fields, the fact that my peers are passionate about social justice and social policy has been a big advantage of attending Heller as well. While Heller is not homogenous, there is definitely a sense of shared values and a commitment to social change. This was a powerful motivator in my decision to attend Heller, and the experience that students have in non-profit, government, and social impact settings has really enriched class discussions.

Flexibility and options

While I entered Heller in the MPP program, I was interested in adding a dual MBA, and knew that doing so would only add about 6 months to my time in graduate school due to the accelerated schedule of the MBA program. Knowing that there were options like this available also informed my decision to attend Heller. In general, the culture here is to help students figure out how to accomplish what it is they want to do. I am glad that my impressions of this culture when I decided on Heller have been proven correct by my 2.5 years here!

Matching Heller Classes to Skills

Man in plaid shirt smiling at camera

Doug Nevins BA ’11, MPP ’21

As my own job search begins to get underway in earnest, I have been thinking more about my own skills and those that I have developed at Heller specifically. I’m also thinking about the skills demanded by employers, and the degree to which Heller coursework aligns with these. Overall, I’m pretty pleased with the way in which skills I’ve gained or strengthened at Heller translate to the requirements included in job listings, and I thought I would share a few examples to help make the utility of specific Heller courses seem a bit more concrete.

Skill/experience: experience with statistics and statistical packages such as STATA, SPSS, R, etc.

Countless job listings include some version of the above preferred qualification. In Heller’s statistics courses like “Data, Models and Decisions,” students learn how to construct regression models and run various statistical tests using STATA, one of the more commonly used stats software packages. Additional courses such as “Working with National Datasets” and “Evaluating Survey Data Using Stata” expand upon fundamental skills and introduce students to other software platforms such as SPSS.

Skill/experience: experience conducting qualitative research including surveys, focus groups, interviews

Many research-oriented jobs, as well as jobs in consulting, program management, or international development, will require some amount of qualitative data collection and analysis. Core courses in Heller degree programs, such as “Research Methods and Evaluation” in the MPP program, introduce best practices in qualitative research and enable students to practice designing study proposals. Many classes include experiential components in which students have the option to interview external stakeholders. One example is the Team Consulting Project, the MBA capstone project in which students typically conduct research to inform recommendations to a real world client organization.

Skill/experience: experience managing a budget and performing financial analysis

One of my primary motivations to add a dual MBA to my MPP course of study was wanting to take accounting and corporate finance courses. Even non-MBAs, however, will have the chance to take coursework in economics, cost-benefit analysis, and program management. In addition, students who choose to participate in the Heller Student Association or a Heller working group can gain experience managing an organizational budget. Many students will develop these skills in internships, as well. Not to mention having a crash course in personal finance during grad school!

Skill/experience: teamwork, leadership, project management

While these are skills that can be learned in many types of settings, even as someone who worked for years in very collaborative office environments, I found that my efficacy and communication abilities working in groups improved during graduate school. All degree programs will include at least some group projects, and these are a great way to strengthen teamwork, listening, and interpersonal skills. While these may be difficult to capture on a resume, the Heller degree itself conveys that you have experience working in a close-knit, collaborative environment.

As I prepare to re-enter the working world, I feel grateful for the varied practical skills I have learned at Heller. Visiting the Career Center here is a great way to figure out how to effectively communicate my strengths in resumes and cover letters. While learning for its own sake is important, and highly valued here, it’s great to know that Heller is preparing students to work in settings where we can take on challenging, real world issues.

Is the MA in Sustainable International Development Program Right for Me?

Now that the admissions cycle for Fall 2021 is closed, we’re beginning to gear up for the Fall 2022 entry cycle, which means we’re doing a pivot over here on the blog: while we’ve been focusing on the needs of our admitted students for the last few months, now I’ll be shifting my focus to those of you who are just embarking on your journey to find the right program. For the past few months, I’ve been doing a spotlight on our six programs to help you figure out if one of Heller’s programs is right for you. Today, we wrap up this series with…

MA in Sustainable International Development

What is it? Heller’s Sustainable International Development (SID) program offers a practical, skills-based curriculum that prepares students to promote responsible development in the world’s poorest and most vulnerable regions. The SID program has a unique and flexible program structure, with four different tracks including an Accelerated Track (where students can complete the degree in as little as 9 months), a Two-Year Practicum Track, Two-Year Advanced Study Track, and a Two-Year Concentration Track, so you can customize your program to meet your needs. Whichever track you choose, the program is designed to help students address inequities and injustice, reduce environmental destruction, and promote income generation through entrepreneurship and access to credit. Students will develop their knowledge of the root causes of poverty, gain scientific literacy on climate change, build skills for collecting and analyzing data, and improve their organizational, program, and project management skills.

Who’s it for? Our typical SID student has at least two to three years of work experience – that can be translated into real work, Peace Corps experience, volunteering and internship experience while an undergrad, etc. Our SID students all have different goals: some come into the program with a clear focus and reason who  want to excel in their passion or a field they already have experience in, while others come to explore what path of development they want to work in. There are so many branches of development work and our program really showcases that and allows students to find their niche. Our students are passionate, justice-seekers, hands-on, dedicated, not afraid to get dirty and highly motivated to change the world around them.

What kinds of classes will I take? In your first two semesters, you’ll take core courses like Climate Change, Biodiversity, and Development; Ethics, Rights and Development;  and Political Ecology and Development, while also choosing electives that match your area of interest, like Gender and the Environment. If you opt for the Advanced Study or Concentration Tracks, you’ll then get to choose from electives like Social Movements for Emancipatory DevelopmentEconomics of Education or Religion and Development. In the Practicum Track (which includes a six month practicum) or Concentration Track (which includes a three month practicum), students receive academic credit for their practicum assignment with organizations such as a UN agency, an international NGO, or a research think tank. Past practicum organizations have included Save the Children, Oxfam, World Bank, or UN agencies.

Where will it take me? SID students gain the knowledge, skills and tools at Heller to get great jobs where they bring innovative ideas and creative practice to the development sector. Furthermore, they learn about human rights, gender equity, inclusive societies and environmental sustainability—the values that we believe should guide development work, whether it’s in a large multilateral organization or a small local nonprofit organization. Examples of positions held by recent graduates (those who have graduated within five years) include Co-founder and CEO for WorkAround, Associate Reporting Officer for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and Communications and Engagement Director for Sustainable Business & Innovation at Nike.  Alumni who have graduated more than five years ago hold positions like Venezuela’s Ambassador to Argentina under President Guaidó, a U.S. Foreign Service Officer, and an International Trade Advisor for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

How is Heller’s program different? Mainly, our vast array of faculty members with many different specializations and experience within development. It’s a high-touch program and students have very close proximity and access to our faculty, administrators, and researchers. Much of what they learn is actually outside of the classroom, working on group projects, competitions, research with faculty, field trips, etc. Not to mention the six-month practicum that the SID program requires for the Two-Year Practicum Track program. The Heller SID student community is uniquely diverse both in individual backgrounds as well as in academic interests; in a typical year, about 60% of our students come from outside the U.S., representing between 20 and 30 different countries (mostly from the Middle East, Africa and Southeast Asia). Many of our U.S. students have worked internationally or served in the Peace Corps or military, while others have built careers focused on issues of domestic conflict.

Is the MA in Conflict Resolution and Coexistence Program Right for Me?

Now that the admissions cycle for Fall 2021 is closed, we’re beginning to gear up for the Fall 2022 entry cycle, which means we’re doing a pivot over here on the blog: while we’ve been focusing on the needs of our admitted students for the last few months, now I’ll be shifting my focus to those of you who are just embarking on your journey to find the right program. Over the next few months, I’ll be doing a spotlight on our six programs to help you figure out if one of Heller’s programs is right for you. Next up?

MA in Conflict Resolution and Coexistence

What is it? Heller’s Conflict Resolution and Coexistence (COEX) program offers a practical, skills-based curriculum that prepares students to become responsible peace-building practitioners throughout the world. The COEX program has a unique structure, including a half-year field practicum, numerous dual degree opportunities, and the ability to concentrate in humanitarian aid or development. The 56-credit curriculum includes one academic year in residence (32 credits) followed by six months of combined fieldwork (12 credits) and a final paper, leading either to an internship report, a master’s paper, or master’s thesis (12 credits). If students wish, they can then go on to complete a concentration in Humanitarian Aid and Disaster Management. Whether you add the optional concentration semester or not, the program is designed to help students learn to foster inter-communal and international cooperation in the face of tension and conflict. The approach is interdisciplinary, drawing a range of fields, including social psychology, international politics, sociology, law, anthropology, and cultural studies.

Who’s it for? Our typical COEX student has at least two to three years of work experience who want to gain the tools and skills to solve problems and facilitate discussions. They want to engage in difficult conversations and synthesize different perspectives so they can manage conflict, resolve it and seek productive pathways forward.  Our program attracts people who are driven by peacebuilding and want to do that while incorporating cultural contexts and empowering local communities. Our students come to Heller with an array of skills and experiences, from military veterans and humanitarian aid professionals to Peace Corps members and grassroots organizers.

What kinds of classes will I take? In your first two semesters, you’ll take core courses like Responsible Negotiation, Responsible Mediation, and Strategies for Coexistence Interventions, while also choosing electives that match your area of interest, like Disaster Management and Risk ReductionWomen, Peacemaking, and Peacebuilding, and Kingian Nonviolence and Reconciliation.  The following summer, you’ll have the opportunity to engage in a  3-month, full-time practicum that can be a traditional internship, the implementation of a conflict resolution project in the field, or research leading to a thesis. In the case of a traditional internship, students receive academic credit for their three-month practicum assignment with organizations such as a UN agency, an international NGO, or a research think tank. Past practicum organizations have included Search For Common Ground, the United Nations, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Carter Center, the Massachusetts Department of Corrections and the International Organization on Migration. In their final semester, students write their final reports and have the opportunity to present their findings at a capstone event.

Where will it take me? COEX students learn how to analyze conflict, structure and evaluate interventions, engage people and partners, and develop regional or national specializes that prepare them to find amazing jobs in the conflict resolution field. Our alumni find work in governments, intergovernmental organizations, and international and local non-governmental organizations dealing with coexistence issues. Examples of positions held by recent graduates (those who have graduated within five years) include Co-founder and CEO for WorkAround, Public Health Advisor for the CDC, and Policy Analyst for the New York City Department of Corrections.  Alumni who have graduated more than five years ago hold positions like First Secretary for the Embassy of Afghanistan in London, Developmental Evaluator for Social Impact, and the Regional Program Manager for Africa and the Middle East for KARAMA.

How is Heller’s program different? The COEX program at Heller is unique because it is rare for a conflict resolution program to have courses in both mediation and negotiation, but we offer both to provide a holistic approach to engage in a meaningful and productive dialogue. The teaching model is heavily discussion-based, incorporating structured debates and simulation exercises as well as facilitated discussions that occur organically in class. The Heller COEX student community is uniquely diverse both in individual backgrounds as well as in academic interests; in a typical year, about 60% of our students come from outside the U.S., representing between 20 and 30 different countries (mostly from the Middle East, Africa and Southeast Asia). Many of our U.S. students have worked internationally or served in the Peace Corps or military, while others have built careers focused on issues of domestic conflict.

Is the MS in Global Health Policy and Management Program right for me?

Now that the admissions cycle for Fall 2021 is closed, we’re beginning to gear up for the Fall 2022 entry cycle, which means we’re doing a pivot over here on the blog: while we’ve been focusing on the needs of our admitted students for the last few months, now I’ll be shifting my focus to those of you who are just embarking on your journey to find the right program. Over the next few months, I’ll be doing a spotlight on our six programs to help you figure out if one of Heller’s programs is right for you. Next up?

MS in Global Health Policy and Management Program

What is it? Heller’s MS in Global Health Policy and Management program helps students to gain a holistic understanding of health systems, so our graduates can have an impact that transcends individual patient outcomes. Students gain skills and insights that align closely with the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals and the WHO mandate for Universal Health Coverage — which means they learn how to make structural improvements to health care systems that benefit entire populations.  The core MS curriculum is divided into three main components: first, students learn the financing and payment systems involved in health systems strengthening; second, they develop the analytical skills that form the heart of any health system, and use them to develop policy briefs; third, they learn how to implement those policies in real-life situations. Students can also choose between two concentrations: the Health Systems Concentration and the Health Economics and Analytics Concentration (a STEM designated program), but no matter which track you choose, you’ll be able to complete your program in 9 months.

Who’s it for? Our typical MS-GHPM student has at least two to three years of experience in a health system, whether that means they’ve been working in a health clinic, an emergency room, or a private practice, and are driven to pursue a career where they will have a greater impact. They know which community they want to work with to make the most impact, and they’re drawn to the idea of creating social change on the macro level of the health care system. If you’re motivated to improve patient outcomes on a grander scale, and you want to learn how to implement a social change within a health care system, the MS-GHPM program might be right for you.

What kinds of classes will I take? Regardless of your concentration, you’ll take core courses like International Health Systems and Development, Introduction to Microeconomics in Global Health, and Intersectionality and Bioethics. In your second semester, you’ll be  able to choose to take diverse electives to broaden your knowledge or a cluster of electives within a thematic area to achieve greater depth (e.g. health policy, management, development, etc.). Some examples of elective classes include Healthcare Marketing, Management of Health Care Organizations, or Healthcare Technology. After these two semesters, you’ll be eligible to graduate with your MS in Global Health Policy and Management.

Where will it take me? MS students gain the tools and knowledge at Heller to get great jobs where they make positive, effective social change for improved global health. Furthermore, they learn how to evaluate health systems, how to conduct cost-effectiveness analyses and how to act as ethical, inclusive leaders among a variety of health care stakeholders. After graduation, MS students go on to work in a variety of positions (including government, nonprofit, the private sector, and academia). Examples of positions held by recent graduates (those who have graduated within five years) include Clinical Specialist for Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Technical Specialist for IntraHealth International, and Senior Health Financing Advisor for Palladium. Alumni who have graduated more than five years ago hold positions like Faculty for Global Health Service Partnership, Clinical Services Lead for USAID Bangladesh’s Office of Health, Population, Nutrition and Education, and Immunization Technical Consultant for Johns Hopkins International Vaccine Access Center.

How is Heller’s program different? Heller is a top ten school of social policy as well as top ten for Health Policy and Management. We emphasize giving students the tools they need to make a lasting impact, like defining policy solutions for market failures and conducting a health system assessments. We put health policy at the core of our required courses. We go deep on topics like health systems strengthening and implementation analytics that are often covered only through electives in comparable programs. Our student body is incredibly diverse. With more than half of GHPM students hailing from outside the U.S., you’ll gain a 360-degree view of the world’s health care systems and forge connections with health professionals from every corner of the world — enriching both your graduate experience and your professional network. And, crucially, we give you the skills you need in only nine months, so you can get back to the field as soon as possible.

« Older posts

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)