Justice Brandeis Semester Lecture Series on Mobile Apps and Game Design

Rob Lindeman ’87 (Assoc Prof of CS at WPI) gave a great talk to the Justice Brandeis Semester Mobile Apps and Game Design program students a week ago. He talked about his work in Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality. This is part of a series of lectures on Mobile Apps and Game Design. You can see the rest of the series at this link: https://sites.google.com/site/jbs2011mobile/info-pages/classroom-work/speakers including videos of past lectures and info about future lectures. Feel free to stop by if you are in the neighborhood. Lectures are Mondays 1-2 in Lemberg 55. We’ve also had talks by the CTO of the One Laptop Per Child program (Ed McNierny) and CTOs of a few mobile startups in the area. In two weeks, we’ll have Haggai Goldfarb ’85 talking about his Mobile Game company LiquidBits. These lectures are open to everyone and will be followed by demonstrations of the mobile app projects of the Justice Brandeis Semester students which all are invited to attend.

VIDEO: Rob Lindeman ’85 on “Virtual and Augmented Reality”

Sprout Grant Winners 2011

Entrepreneurship is alive and well at Brandeis.

Last week, fourteen teams of Brandeis scientists presented their research to a panel of industry experts to compete for funding from the Brandeis University Virtual Incubator Sprout Grant Program.  The Virtual Incubator seeks to nurture and support entrepreneurial scientists at Brandeis by providing education, mentoring, networking and seed grants to help move their discoveries from the laboratory to the market.

Judges were impressed by the team presentations. The teams ranged from biologists who have projects that could be ready for licensing as early as next year, to computer science / IT entrepreneurship students with a web application that already has 1200 users.

“We were overwhelmed by the phenomenal proposals we received” says Irene Abrams, Associate Provost for Innovation.  “The response was incredible – with only a few weeks notice, 23 teams applied for Sprout Grants and 14 presented their proposals to the panel of judges.  I was impressed by the level of creativity among the applicants, and by the hard work the teams put into the presentations.  We only had $50,000, so we had to turn down many excellent applications, which we would have funded if we had more money.”

The 2011 winning projects are:

  • Generation Of A Rapid And Efficient Protein Knockout System, Lead Scientist:  Erin Jonasson (with Satoshi Yoshida)
  • Identification Of Molecules For Stabilizing DJ-1, A Protein Involved In Parkinson And Alzheimer Diseases. Lead Scientist: Joey Salisbury (with Brian Williams, Ala Nassar, Jeff Agar and Greg Petsko)
  • Targeting Oncogenic Ras For Protein Degradation, A Novel Approach To Therapy. Lead Scientist: Rory Coffey (with Marcus Long, Ruibao Ren, and Liz Hedstrom)
  • Identifying Pharmacological Chaperones that Promote Survival in Mouse Models of ALS, Lead Scientist: Jared Auclair (with Joey Salisbury, Dagmar Ringe, Greg Petsko, and Jeff Agar)
  • A Novel, Low Cost, Highly Sensitive Form Of Suppression PCR, Lead Scientist: Ken Sugino (with Sean O’Toole and Sacha Nelson)
  • Zen.Do, Team: Bill DeRusha, Joshua Silverman, Jason Urton (Computer Science)

see also: Brandeis NOW

The Volen Center for Complex Systems Retreat, 2011

(co-written by Tilman Kispersky)

Introduction and Location

The annual Volen Center Retreat was held this week at the bucolic Warren Conference Center and Retreat in Ashland, Massachusetts.  The purpose of the one-day retreat is to provide a forum for conversation and encourage collaborations between members of the Brandeis and Volen center research communities.   Funded by the M.R. Bauer Foundation, the retreat features a distinguished invited speaker, lectures from Volen faculty that highlight the diversity of Neuroscience research at the Center and a poster session covering ongoing research projects of the members of the community.

The director of the Volen Center, Prof. Arthur Wingfield began the proceedings with a brief history of the retreat which is in its 17th consecutive year.  While historically the most common location for the retreat has been the Marine Biological Labs in Woods Hole, MA the retreat was held at the 220 acre property of the Warren Conference Center outside of Framingham this year.  Prof. Wingfield introduced the theme of the retreat: “Imaging: Recent breakthroughs in visualization – from synapses to circuits”.  Each lecture focused on data collected with advanced imaging techniques and highlighted how advanced optical methods had enabled a deeper understand of nervous system.

Lectures

The first lecture was given by Prof. Aniruddha Das from the Columbia University Department of Neuroscience.  Prof. Das’ research group developed a method to perform dual-wavelength imaging to measure both the volume of blood present in a given region of cortex as well as the oxygenation level of that blood, two quantities that are combined in traditional fMRI imaging.  Using dual-wavelength imaging Prof. Das found a task-related anticipatory haemodynamic signal in the visual cortex of awake monkeys.  This signal was unrelated to either single unit activity or any visual stimulation.  The finding suggests that cortical circuits increase their blood oxygenation level prior to the expected onset of a task in anticipation of the increased computational load.

The second speaker was Brandeis Professor Stephen Van Hooser.   Prof. Van Hooser studies motion detection in the visual system and is specifically interested in how motion selectivity develops and what role sensory inputs play in this process.  The ferret visual system, the animal model used by Prof. Van Hooser, develops orientation selectivity prior to receiving any sensory input.  However, motion selectivity requires visual inputs and thus develops later, after young ferrets open their eyes.  Prof. Van Hooser presented experimental results that employed two-photon imaging to simultaneously measure the activation of hundreds of cells at depths of up to 300 um beneath the cortical surface.  By presenting moving visual stimuli Prof. Van Hooser was able to track the emergence of motion selectivity in cortical neurons and was able to influence the course of development by changing the direction of motion of the stimulus.

Following the mid-day poster session, the afternoon portion of the retreat featured a trio of talks covering some of the cutting-edge imaging work currently being done at Brandeis.  First up was Dr. Avital Rodal (pictured at right), whose lab employs an innovative, high speed confocal microscopy technique to capture high-resolution images of tagged endosomes on the move in developing fly neurons.  By combining different markers in the same experiment, Dr. Rodal has been able to demonstrate transient interactions, undetectable by traditional methods.  Potentially, her work could help us understand a range of health issues in which endosomal trafficking has been implicated, including neurodegenerative disease and mental retardation.  See the moving endosomes for yourself in a recent blog post covering her exciting work!

The next speaker was able to remind us that sometimes it takes more than biologists to do biology — especially when the task is high-throughput image analysis.  Dr. Pengyu Hong, an Assistant Professor of Computer Science here at Brandeis, shared some of his work using High Content Screening, an automated method of analyzing image data and extracting information about cellular phenotypes and neurite length from images of cell cultures.  Using data provided by his collaborators around the world, his method is able to quantify neuronal morphology, allowing for high throughput genetic and drug discovery screening at improved levels of accuracy — a previously intractable task.

The final speaker of the retreat shared with us an intriguing work in progress.  Dr. David DeRosier (pictured at left), Brandeis Emeritus Professor of Biology, currently a member of the Turrigiano lab, has been developing an imaging technique called “Cryo-PALM”. If it sounds cool, it’s much more than that; it involves holding a biological sample frozen at no more than -140C, while imaging it with a room temperature microscope objective less than a millimeter away.  It sounds difficult — and as David told us, it is! — but the potential is huge.  Dr. DeRosier hopes to be able to precisely localize fluorescently labeled proteins in the synapse down to sub-nanometer resolution, and provide the most detailed picture ever of synaptic structure.

This year’s Volen center retreat was another success, with lots of informative talks, informal mingling, and even delicious food!

NEUCS-2011

Brandeis is one of the co-organizers of the third annual New England Undergraduate Computing Symposium which will be held on Saturday April 9th at Tufts University. This symposium is designed to build community among undergraduate Computer Science majors in New England and also to increase the diversity of our undergraduate majors by actively reaching out to under-represented groups and encouraging them to participate. Students register online at https://sites.google.com/site/neucs11/ by completing a simple form describing the project they plan to demo or present as a poster. We expect to have 60-80 students projects and around 150 students and faculty attending the symposium. If you are an undergrad that has written an interesting mobile app, or completed a creative project in one of your classes, or are working in a research lab on an exciting problem involving computation, please visit the site and register to present your project and/or demo your code.

NEUCS2010

Helfgott ’98 wins Adams Prize in mathematics

Harald Helfgott ’98 has been awarded the Adams Prize by the University of Cambridge (UK), one of its oldest and most prestigious prizes. The prize, awarded jointly to Helfgott and to Dr. Tom Sanders (University of Cambridge), honors young UK-based mathematicians  doing “first class international research in mathematical sciences”. Helfgott, currently a Reader at Univ. of Bristol and researcher at the CNRS/ENS (Paris), has been the recipient of additional prestigious prizes. In 2010 he was awarded the Whitehead Prize by the London Mathematical Society for his contributions to number theory and in 2008 he was awarded the Leverhulme Mathematics Prize for his work on number theory, diophantine geometry, and group theory.

Helfgott was a double major in Mathematics and Computer Science while at Brandeis, graduating summa cum laude with highest honors in both disciplines. Professors from both departments recall Harald as a top student, extremely well prepared, outspoken, and as one who truly loves to learn and  exchange ideas. He took full advantage of the opportunities for independent research in both departments, resulting in several conference papers and publications. In Computer Science, working with James Storer completed significant research projects on genetic algorithms for lossless image compression, Lempel-Ziv methods for two dimensional lossless compression, predictive coding, and maximal parsings. He formulated an approach to two dimensional coding that equaled one of the best methods in the literature at the time and had a number of computational advantages. According to Storer “He had an impact on nearly every research group in the Computer Science Department at that time.”

Regarding Helfgott’s work in the Math department, Ira Gessel remembers:

Although I never had him for a course, I did write a paper with him when he was an undergraduate here (the only paper I’ve ever written with an undergraduate).  Harald was involved in an undergraduate  research program with Jim Propp on tilings, and he had made some progress on solving some open problems on counting certain types of tilings. He was having trouble evaluating some determinants, and I helped him with that technical aspect of his work. But the main ideas of the paper were all Harald’s.

On graduation, Helfgott chose to focus on mathematics, doing his Ph.D. at Princeton and post-doctoral stints at Yale and at Concordia University before moving to his current position at Bristol. In addition to his current active research career, Helfgott also has been “strongly committed to the free sharing of information in all areas of intellectual activity“, giving lecture series to students and young researchers in the Third World, including lecture series in India, Cuba, Bolivia, and his native Peru.

According to Gessel:

It’s difficult to give a nontechnical account of most of Harald’s work, but here’s one of his results that’s not too hard to state.  He proved a difficult conjecture of Paul Erdős that if f(x) is a cubic polynomial with integer coefficients (satisfying some additional obvious necessary conditions that I’ll omit) then there are infinitely many primes p such that f(p) is not divisible by a square.

Mobile Applications and Game Development (JBS Summer 2011 Program)

Justice Brandeis Semester Programs for Summer 2011 are accepting applications – deadline is March 15, 2011. Among the programs is Mobile Applications and Game Development, run by Tim Hickey and Pito Salas, which is being offered for the second time this year. Last year’s student projects:

  • Cakewalk, a way to share routes and the information along them.
  • Social Market is a application which let you invest anytime and anywhere.
  • Definitious,  an online dictionary whose definitions are submitted and voted on by the online community.
  • Roommate Helper, an online resource for improving communication between roommates, in order to promote more harmonious living.

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